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Jointing with hand router

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  • Jointing with hand router

    Good day

    I don't have planer (jointer) and when I have to make the "glue line" for panel glue-up, I'm using the router with straight edge like many others.

    But, I don't like all the measuring so I made some small locating blocks that helps me to position and clamp the straight edge in seconds and I like to share it with you.

    The bad news is, that you have to make separate pair for every bit diameter (I'm using usually 10 mm bit).

    Regards
    niki












































  • #2
    Re: Jointing with hand router













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    • #3
      Re: Jointing with hand router

      Niki, you are the best!

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      • #4
        Re: Jointing with hand router

        Niki,
        Jigs are vey useful, and much easier than measuring.
        I like the extended router base.
        What is the piurpose of havng the Up and Down orientation when routing the adjacent edges?

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        • #5
          Re: Jointing with hand router

          Thank you so much for your kind words

          Handidad

          The purpose of the "UP" and "Down" routing is just to ensure that the boards fit 100% in the vertical plan - just in case that the router bit is not EXACTLY at 90° to the base.

          To visualize it better, I'll give an example from the table saw......
          Lets exaggerate and set the saw blade at 45°....if you will rip two boards on the same side of the blade, you'll get two 45° cuts but when you'll put the boards one touching the other, you'll get a gap (of 90°) on one side...

          But, if you'll rip one board on the right side of the blade and the other board, on the left side of the blade, you'll get a perfect vertical fit even if the blade is at any angle....of course, you can do the same just by ripping one board facing up and the adjacent board facing down and rip on the same side of the blade.

          That's the reason that, when I'm cutting mitered picture frame, I cut one board on the left side of the blade and the adjacent one, on the right side of the blade...it will give me always perfect vertical fit of the frame members even if the blade is not at 90° to the table...

          If you are sure that your router bit is exactly at 90° to the base, you can omit the "UP" and "Down" jointing and joint all the boards from the same side.

          As for the extended base, it's a piece of "Floor Panel" (5/16" thick) and I made the same "long base also for my hand held circular saws...it gives much better control at the beginning and end of the cut and in the case of the circular saw, it gives me the ability to adjust the saw blade parallel to the base (sometimes, the blade is not parallel to the blade and the saw "pulls" to one direction or another.

          Regards
          niki

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          • #6
            Re: Jointing with hand router

            Thanks Niki,
            Some of these posts are quite old, so I wasn't certain if you were still answering.
            I noticed the CS base with the attached vertical handle in a different posting.
            How do you get sides of the extended base of the CS to be parallel to the blade?

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            • #7
              Re: Jointing with hand router

              Hi Hedidad

              Generally, I clamp the "Floor panel" to the CS base - keeping it aligned with the base edge (the edge that will guide the saw on the straight edge or sawboard) and drill 4 holes...

              Remove the "Floor panel" and enlarge the holes in the base by 1mm (1/32")....

              Put the "Floor panel" back and tight the screws (actually, countersink head bolts) just finger tight (but strong finger tight)...

              Mark some point on the blade (it doesn't have to be a tooth - it can be on the blade body)...take the caliper and with the depth bar measure the distance on one side - turn the marked point to the other side and check distance...adjust the "Floor panel" till you'll get the same distances on both sides.

              The "floor Panel" thickness is 5/16" and of course it will reduce the max depth of cut but usually, I cut sheet goods and I don't really need the additional 5/16"....more important for me is that the saw doesn't "pull", "push" or leave burn marks...

              It's already 09:00 PM here but, if you like some pictures, just let me know and I'll do it tomorrow morning.

              Regards
              niki

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              • #8
                Re: Jointing with hand router

                Hi niki,

                I am one of the lurkers who reads and saves your ideas to my own computer. A lot of great solutions.

                As for the use of a router as a jointer I use a simpler method which requires much less effort and time, while it always yields perfect results. I got this method when I was a kid from one flooring guy back in the country where you now live . He would overlap pieces of linoleum and cut through two layer at the same time. The joints were invisible.

                I never took pictures of the process I use for wood so I am including a drawing I just made. The drawing should be self explanatory (give or take). Proposed sizes and dimensions are not absolutes and can be changed to fit individual circumstances and available router bits.
                Attached Files
                In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Jointing with hand router

                  Thank you so much Darius

                  I've seen somewhere this method and you can even do it with an hand held circular saw...you just attach the two pieces, set the straight edge and cut on the line between them....it will automatically compensate for any deviation of the saw from 90° (same like with your method)

                  It looks (I've never tried) that your idea will work very good.....as for the speed, I have to try what takes more time. As you can see, I'm using the "Locator blocks" that makes the fence setting a breeze...

                  I noticed that you are using bearing guided bit and that means that the bit should be long enough to cover the straight edge and the workpiece.....If you'll go back to the first pictures you'll see that I don't have such a long bearing guided bit....but if you have it, yeap, your method should work like a charm...

                  Best regards
                  niki

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                  • #10
                    Re: Jointing with hand router

                    Actually the technique that Darius has shown has the added requirement of holding the 2 boards at a fixed separation.
                    The fence could be moved away from the edge so that the router base rides against the fence as shown by Niki.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Jointing with hand router

                      Indeed, the boards need to be clamped. I kinda forgot to mention that, but I also though it was a given. The good news is that the distance between the boards does not need to be perfectly parallel throughout the entire length of both boards, as long as it is slightly smaller than the diameter of the router bit.
                      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Jointing with hand router

                        Here is a little tute I put together a couple years ago. I do use a regular straight edge, but this is for beginers. http://www.hoistman.com/HoistMan/EdgeJointing.html
                        info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                        • #13
                          Re: Jointing with hand router

                          Hi Papadan

                          Very nice tutorial

                          I don't have such a flush trim bit so I used the other method.

                          Now...small secret about Straight Edge...I have one that is 2.5m = 98.5" and it cost me here $20....don't forget that "Euro-Prices" are normally double or more that in USA and if you add to it the fact that we are paying 22% VAT.....

                          Go to the "Builders supply" (also the "wall-to-wall carpet" guys are using it here)...you can buy one with level or without (the levels makes it more expensive)...they have a few lengths up to 4m (well, 4 Yards)

                          I found it surprisingly straight and I use it with circular saw or joint a glue line with the router.

                          Regards
                          niki

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