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  • Project #1

    I just wanted to share a picture of the second "woodworking" project.
    I've done a lot of work on flooring, decks, porches, and drywall in the last few years, but these are my first two furniture type projects.
    The first one is an aquarium stand for a hexagon aquarium.
    I was concerned about the thing being strong enough to safely hold 800 pounds of salt water and rocks and fish, so it's framed underneath with 2x4's and then sheeted with 3/4" poplar plywood and trimmed in oak. I had no plans, and figuring out the corners, especially for the top was a challenge. Tonight I have to finish fixing up the top cover where i had to make cutouts for the filter lines to exit the tank. Maybe I'll be able to get better pictures.




    The second project, this little table, I built completely out of wood I already had in my workshop. The table is only about 8" high, and the top is 16x30. It serves a very specific need; It holds up a new 32" flat screen television in that window seat area. There's just enough room underneath for the DVD player / surround sound set up.



    Don't look too closely, because you'll see all of the mistakes I made. It looks great from at least 6 feet away, so I'm pleased.

  • #2
    Re: Project #1

    Nice work, Kneescar! They both look real nice. I don't know how you figured the angles for the aquarium stand. Maybe you could share your technique? I always have a rough time with angles.

    I like your TV stand. One thing I learned when I started my hobby was "don't sweat it." In other words, when it's done, it's done. You may know there's flaws here and there, but others won't see them. The project looks great, and I'm sure it'll be something you're proud of for years to come.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      angles

      Thanks, VASandy. I appreciate the input.
      To figure out the angles, I spent some time with pencil, paper and a protractor and tried to remember 10th grade geometry:
      I knew that I had 6 sides that needed to complete a circle, so I divided 360 degrees by 6 and came up with 60 degrees. To test it I drew a circle and 6 chords, each at 60 degree angles to the adjacent chords.
      This worked, and it made sense, but when it came time to translate that to actually working with the tools, I soon found out the answer wasn't that easy. 60 degrees was not the angle of the cut, but the angle I wanted the pieces to form once they were cut and joined. I'm not sure if I remembered some rule about complimentary angles, or if I just used the protractor, but I arrived at 30 degrees. For every angled cut on the aquarium I set my miter saw (or circular saw for the panels) at 30 degrees.


      Hope this helps.

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      • #4
        Re: Project #1

        Believe it or not TV stands is what got me into this hobby. I am big into home theater and go through stereo equipment like crazy (I like to try different stuff) and can never find a suitable tv/audio stand to suit my needs. Then it hit me, going the DIY route means I can make it any size I want.

        Nice job on the aquarium!

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        • #5
          Re: Project #1

          I agree, nice work. The wood itself isn't cheap and theres work involved but those things will last you a long time and you have the satisfaction and pride in knowing you made them. Just not the same as when you buy it made or put it together from a kit. I wish wood was more reasonable, I'm retired and on a budget so I can't tinker too much. I made a six foot long desk with a matching hutch a couple years ago, used furniture grade plywood from Home Depot $40 something a sheet. Total cost was a couple hundred dollars but man it turned out nice.I've made a couple smaller simple desks for my daughters and they are so much nicer and sturdy than that stuff in a box. Keep up the good work, you have what it takes.
          P.S., Please let us know how that blade turned out, the one that was not cutting?

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          • #6
            Re: Project #1

            You do have mistakes and they are very visible...

            First, I think that the background that you selected for the picture is not good.......

            Otherwise, really beautiful work on both the aquarium and the table.

            Oh, salt water aquarium was my dream but at that time (30 years ago) it was too expensive so I had to go with sweet water...the salt water fishes are much more beautiful and colorful.

            niki

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            • #7
              Re: Project #1

              They both look nice... I just don't know if I'd ever have the cahones to build something intended to hold 800lbs!!! It's a good thing to see it worked!!!

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              • #8
                Re: Project #1

                If I remember my geometry sum of the inside angles is equal to the number of sides less 2 times 180 degrees (n-2)*180. On a six sided project the inside angles would be (6-2)*180=720. Divide by 6 and each inside angle is 120 degrees. Half of that is 60 degrees which should be the cut on the end of each piece. I think this will work for any project as long as the opposite sides are the same length.

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                • #9
                  Re: Project #1

                  Originally posted by tchads View Post
                  If I remember my geometry sum of the inside angles is equal to the number of sides less 2 times 180 degrees (n-2)*180. On a six sided project the inside angles would be (6-2)*180=720. Divide by 6 and each inside angle is 120 degrees. Half of that is 60 degrees which should be the cut on the end of each piece. I think this will work for any project as long as the opposite sides are the same length.

                  Where people get into trouble is that they forget that the saw blade starts out at 90 degrees to the board surface on both a TS and a miter saw, but is marked on the saw as 0 degrees. So if you want a 60 degree angle on the wood, and your saw blade at vertical is 90 degrees from the side, you subtract 60 from 90 and set your TS (or MS) bevel at 30 degrees.

                  Go
                  Practicing at practical wood working

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