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3650 question

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  • 3650 question

    ok I am about to take the plunge , got the go ahead from the wife to pick up the 3560 from hd with my taxes, and I am going to run a new outlet for the saw, is it better to set it up for 220 or leave it at 110 ?

  • #2
    Re: 3650 question

    Originally posted by razzman View Post
    ok I am about to take the plunge , got the go ahead from the wife to pick up the 3560 from hd with my taxes, and I am going to run a new outlet for the saw, is it better to set it up for 220 or leave it at 110 ?
    You won't get any more power out of 220, you'll just use 1/2 as many amps. If you are going to have a dedicated circuit; I would just run a 20 amp 110V circuit; which you can use for most of the tools that you are going to buy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 3650 question

      You can use lighter gauge wire for 220v (less expensive), and you'll likely get less voltage loss on a 220v line, but since the 3650 only draws 13 amps, it's less on an issue for that motor. If I had to run a line, I'd run 220v...you just never know if and when you'll end up needing it for a 3hp cabinet saw in the future, BS, DC, 2hp jointer, etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 3650 question

        I run my 3650 on a 20-amp 110V circuit. Never had a problem. Note, if you're running the wire yourself, you *must* use 12g solid core copper wire. 14g is not rated for 20 amps. Also, you will need a 20-amp outlet. They're about $10 each, versus $0.79 for normal outlets.

        But, the advantage is, I can use the same plugs for my router, bandsaw, vacuum, cordless chargers, etc etc.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 3650 question

          Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
          I run my 3650 on a 20-amp 110V circuit. Never had a problem. Note, if you're running the wire yourself, you *must* use 12g solid core copper wire. 14g is not rated for 20 amps. Also, you will need a 20-amp outlet. They're about $10 each, versus $0.79 for normal outlets.

          But, the advantage is, I can use the same plugs for my router, bandsaw, vacuum, cordless chargers, etc etc.
          Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winner!!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 3650 question

            Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
            I run my 3650 on a 20-amp 110V circuit. Never had a problem. Note, if you're running the wire yourself, you *must* use 12g solid core copper wire. 14g is not rated for 20 amps. Also, you will need a 20-amp outlet. They're about $10 each, versus $0.79 for normal outlets.
            Do you actually need a 20A receptacle ? I thought that you only needed a 20A receptacle if there was only a single receptacle on the circuit and that if you had more than one receptacle it was OK to use the 15A outlets as long as you do the screws, if you do the quickwire then it isn't rated for 20A passthrough.

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            • #7
              Re: 3650 question

              Originally posted by cpw View Post
              Do you actually need a 20A receptacle ? I thought that you only needed a 20A receptacle if there was only a single receptacle on the circuit and that if you had more than one receptacle it was OK to use the 15A outlets as long as you do the screws, if you do the quickwire then it isn't rated for 20A passthrough.
              I thought the deciding factor was the breaker in the panel? If I have a 20A breaker on my 12/2 wired circuit and I had a 15A receptacle on that circuit, couldn't I theoretically pull 20A through that 15A receptacle before the breaker flipped?

              I am frequently wrong.

              -jim

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 3650 question

                15 amp outlets are more than up to the task of handling 12 ga wire on a 20 amp circuit. i am finishing a basement and had to exchange 20 amp outlets on 20 amp circuits for 15 amp outlets. i used to know the reason its ok to use the lower amperage outlets, but i'm having a senior moment.
                there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: 3650 question

                  So I read up on this a bit more... and while I would agree my approach was overkill as far as code, since I wired it myself I didn't want to take any risks that might void my insurance coverage.

                  So, here's what I found:
                  - apparently it's OK to have 15a outlets on a 20a circuit, as long as there are multiple receptacles. In this situation the total draw across the receptacles can potentially get to 20a. Imagine a computer, heater, lamps, stereo, etc etc all on the same circuit. None draws 15a individually (so the outlet isn't at risk), but collectively they might approach 20a.

                  - However, many people on the forums I perused expressed an opinion that "the breaker should pop before the fire starts", essentially meaning, if you have a high draw device and it pulls 15a or more on a single receptacle, that might overstress the outlet's capabilities without tripping the breaker. Ergo, potential fire hazard.

                  I wired my shop to avoid the pitfalls of my last garage workshop, which was always blowing breakers and causing brown-outs when I turned on a machine (it was a 15a *total* garage subpanel).
                  And I did it with total overkill since we had upgraded this house to 200a service. So my shop has two dedicated 20a circuits feeding a total of 9 outlets that go around the room at hip-level height. Every other outlet is on a given circuit and is an alternating color. That way, when I have a helper and they're using the tablesaw and dust collection on the "white" outlets, I know that I should plug my bandsaw and the shop-vac into the "grey" outlets.

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                  • #10
                    Re: 3650 question

                    Very smart, Wood_Junkie! Also just to remind everyone the NEC is there as the minimum work required, higher capability outlets and labelling branch outlets is a very good idea depending on your situation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 3650 question

                      Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
                      And I did it with total overkill since we had upgraded this house to 200a service. So my shop has two dedicated 20a circuits feeding a total of 9 outlets that go around the room at hip-level height. Every other outlet is on a given circuit and is an alternating color. That way, when I have a helper and they're using the tablesaw and dust collection on the "white" outlets, I know that I should plug my bandsaw and the shop-vac into the "grey" outlets.
                      Doing the alternating runs with white and gray outlets is a great idea.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: 3650 question

                        Originally posted by dfstab View Post
                        I thought the deciding factor was the breaker in the panel? If I have a 20A breaker on my 12/2 wired circuit and I had a 15A receptacle on that circuit, couldn't I theoretically pull 20A through that 15A receptacle before the breaker flipped?

                        I am frequently wrong.

                        -jim
                        One point that I see was not mentioned is that a tool that draws more than 15 amps will have on the end of it's cord a plug rated at 20 amps, which will not plug into a 15 amp outlet due to the different configurations of the legs on the plug. So as long as the tool can connect to a 15 amp outlet without modification you are safe.

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