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  • blade slows down

    i am using ts3650 and i am happy with it. the problem i am having

    is when i am trying to put a slot in 3/4" material to accept a

    drawer bottom (only 1 drawer, not enough to install dado set)

    the blade slows down, i am using a freund blade 80 tooth

    the slot size is 1/4 by 3/8 deep, what's happening?

  • #2
    Re: blade slows down

    I had a similar problem when I first installed mine and it turned out to be improper adjustment of the belt tension. I was told by someone on the forum to raise the blade all the way and add tension(by moving the motor) until ,when you pinch the the belt together there is still some movement of the spring. This fixed my problem

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    • #3
      Re: blade slows down

      Could also be an operator related feed speed problem. I'm not saying that it is but have you tried adjusting how fast you're passing the stock through the blade?
      ================================================== ====
      All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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      • #4
        Re: blade slows down

        i tried going slow even tried fast and medium, no avail

        this happens using select pine and 3/4 cabinet plywood

        moving fence blade width approx. three times to acheive width and

        depth

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        • #5
          Re: blade slows down

          Try a few rather fast cross cuts of a scrap 2 x 4 or better yet if you have one a scrap 2 x 8 and please report. Do you hear belt screeching, motor growling?

          What is the number on your saw blade? I'm wondering if it's not intended as a fine trim blade. Tooth shape and grind...

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          • #6
            Re: blade slows down

            Not an expert woodworker here, strictly amateur, but here is my theory. When you are slot cutting a lot more surface area of the blade is in contact with the wood. Your effective blade contact area extends all the way to the top (12 O'clock position on the blade. When you combine that fact with using an 80 tooth blade, you have a lot more teeth trying to cut at once then you have in a normal cut. Therefore, even though you arent cutting deep, you are putting a higher than normal horsepower demand on the motor. You probably have so many teeth in the wood that if you look at an individual tooth, they probably are trying to drag on the wood instead of taking a bite - think brake rotor. Especially if the blade is pushing flexing to the side a little bit and the sides of the teeth are dragging. Just a theory...

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            • #7
              Re: blade slows down

              thanks for your suggestions, will try when i have a few minutes to spare

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              • #8
                Re: blade slows down

                Had a TS3650 and ran it wired to 240V and it was OK but it is a bit underpowered, being a 13A motor it is a stretch in it's 1.5hp rating, most 15A motors are 1.5hp unless they have a very high effency rating. Belt tension, feed rate, depth width, type of wood...all effect the cut but in the final end real HP can make up for a lot as my 3hp Unisaw is way different in that aspect to a contractor saw and I always felt the motor on the Ridgid could be better. The belt system is very good but is not as good as the shorter belted hybrids or cab saws in transfer of power. You power line also may be an issue. Have you checed the line voltage, under load as well as amp draw? Are you using extention cords, 12ga should be used and at a minimum length unless you wire the motor for 240V, which will draw 1/2 the amps on each leg, 6.5A+6.5A.
                As said less teeth would reduce the stress on the motor, the HiATB 40th Freud Fusion may help but it is a $100 blade. You could score the cut line to reduce tearout and use a 24th rip blade which in the Freud's case gives a suprisingly good cut for a minimum price. You could also use a smaller diameter blade as many do with underpowered motors.

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                • #9
                  Re: blade slows down

                  i want to thank all you people who responded to my question on blade slow down.

                  I adjusted the blade tension as someone suggested and it seams
                  to have solved the problem.

                  I will keep an eye on the next time i have to make a few drawers.

                  thanks for all the help and suggestions you people gave me,

                  its nice to know there is help out there.

                  (I still used the 80 tooth blade and ran tests on the select

                  pine and 3/4" baltic birch)

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                  • #10
                    Re: blade slows down

                    Andrew

                    A good true cabinet type table saw will make minced meat out of a hybrid or contractor saw, but then they cost more $$$ and are heavy machines. What I find fun is that the old timer Unisaw had a huge (over 100 pounds) motor rated at 1 HP and it runs contractor saws with up to 2 HP light duty high speed motors into the ground. The 50 year old Unisaw keeps cutting away when the motor on the contractor saw goes up in smoke. Motor ratings are NOT all the same and especially with imported motors.

                    Anyone that either has or has used a good true cabinet type table saw gets spoiled real fast. Then anything less just won't do.

                    To all others reading this, the Ridgid contractor table saw is no toy. If you use it correctly you can get good work from it. It's just not the same as a real serious workhorse that costs many times the $$$.
                    Last edited by Woussko; 03-17-2008, 05:17 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: blade slows down

                      Iwould have to agree with this theory. At home I have the 3650 which is awesome for the stuff I do at home.. At work we have a powermatic model 66 which has a five horse motor.. More power than you will ever need but is a real pleasure to use.. then there is the Holzer 10 foot rolling bed saw.. That sucker is the real heart of the shop and whistles a toon like you've never heard before. Happy and safe cutting

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                      • #12
                        Re: blade slows down

                        jparson1

                        I bet you love that Powermatic 66 and especially if it's one from back when they were still made here in the USA. They were the top of the line cabinet table saw and ran really smooth. The tables were nice and flat with a ground surface. I can only dream about owning one, but I did get to use one for some time back years ago. The one I had access to had a real good tuff 2 HP 3 phase motor that I can assure anyone would rip apart a 3 HP motor of today.

                        Getting back to the subject of this thread, I suggest checking for a slipping belt, motor bogging down under load, and please try to borrow a good AC Voltmeter and check Voltage right at the receptacle where it's plugged in and with the saw cutting. If below 110 Volts, or if the Voltage is XXX with the saw off and XXX - more than 5% drop with saw in use, then it's time to install a heavier circuit for the saw.
                        Last edited by Woussko; 03-17-2008, 10:16 PM.

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