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  • Emerson Tool Company closing plant in Paris, TN

    In reference to recent questions, concerning the closure of our plant in Paris, TN, let me first say this was a difficult decision. We’ve been one of the last companies to manufacture stationary woodworking tools in the U.S., but with the increasing pressure from international competition, the cost advantages of our competitors no longer allow us to operate the Paris facility. As you know the overall cost of doing business is different in different parts of the world, and we have to consider a wide range of factors.

    At the same time the RIDGID brand stands for quality and we will continue to deliver on that promise, regardless of where the tools are made.

    Thanks
    Jake

  • #2
    One of many reasons I have purchased Ridgid tools is because of wear they were built.I will have to watch the quality and reconsider in the future.I have a Ridgid TP1300 and have been satisfied with this product to this point.I think we all know who made your company and the many other companys what they are today it's to bad they have chosen to relocate from our great country
    JLP

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe that the TP1300 is made in Taiwan. I too own one and believe it is a great tool.

      Delta, Jet, Powermatic, Craftsman, et al, have already paved the quality road overseas. Ridgid also has many tools made there too. I wouldn't expect any drop in quality, though I would enjoy a price cut...

      I personally don't care where a product is manufactured, as long as I get what I pay for. The three Ridgid tools that I own are only in my shop because they perform thier function(s) as good or better than the competition and are competitively priced. I don't believe that any of them are made in the US (TP1300, JP610, Orbital spinder sander).

      As our great country continues to grow our economy, wages and standards of living also grow. The good folks at the Paris plant will transition to other work, probably at a higher level (possibly managing the overseas vendor). The good folks in the overseas country (and us too) will also benefit by being able to buy more American products and services (a very strong status symbol!).

      I lived and worked in Taiwan for 3 years and have travelled the world on business for all of my adult life. Folks overseas want to buy American products. The "menial" jobs we send overseas end up creating many more here in the US. It also helps to ensure that US manufacturers don't charge us too much for comperable products (partial Thanks to Sam Walton).

      I make my living producing complex systems for many companies overseas (about 70% of our business is overseas). If we Americans didn't buy certain products from overseas, my foreign customers wouldn't need my company's products and services.

      Jobs and products overseas is a two way street!

      Rant mode off...

      Comment


      • #4
        Jeff---haven't heard such a crock in a long, long time. So, just what "better paying jobs" will the good people of Paris, TN be transitioning into??? The last I heard, the bubble had burst for telecom, computers, software, dot.coms---the list goes on, and while these jobs have disappeared, we've continued to ship more manufacturing overseas.

        I think the thing that's most disturbing about the current manufactured goods trend is that in the sixties and seventies, Japan captured many markets with low prices and higher quality than American manufacturers. Hey, fair is fair. But, now, the American market is flooded with Chinese goods, forcing better quality American manufacturers to compete by moving operations overseas---something wrong with this picture.

        Sorry if this is a bit strong, but we certainly don't need a load of bull about how wonderful everything is going to be---not even George W. believes that load.
        Dave

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        • #5
          I wouldn't hold my breath for any price reduction this move is all about shareholders and corprate profits and the company getting more for their dollar not the consumer
          JLP

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          • #6
            Dave,

            Monster.com has over 1500 jobs listed between Nashville and Memphis. There's probably more if you look at other sources.

            I was "downsized" last year. Found a better paying job and enjoyed the layoff money...

            It's not a load of bull, just the way the world economy is.

            My lively hood has mostly been paid for by sales of "American" made goods to foreign customers ("American" in quotes because we use some high quality foreign parts in our systems). The Americans from whom I buy from here in the USA also benefit from the foreign dollars coming into the US.

            Sure, it's an emotional and financial bump in the road when one loses their job (whether from a layoff or moving production elsewhere) but most of us recover nicely and end up doing better than before.

            Just be careful - you might end up driving a Canadian-built Chrysler (owned by a foreign company).

            Jeff

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff O'Dell:
              Dave,

              Monster.com has over 1500 jobs listed between Nashville and Memphis. There's probably more if you look at other sources.

              I was "downsized" last year. Found a better paying job and enjoyed the layoff money...

              It's not a load of bull, just the way the world economy is.

              My lively hood has mostly been paid for by sales of "American" made goods to foreign customers ("American" in quotes because we use some high quality foreign parts in our systems). The Americans from whom I buy from here in the USA also benefit from the foreign dollars coming into the US.

              Sure, it's an emotional and financial bump in the road when one loses their job (whether from a layoff or moving production elsewhere) but most of us recover nicely and end up doing better than before.

              Just be careful - you might end up driving a Canadian-built Chrysler (owned by a foreign company).

              Jeff
              I drive an Acura built by Honda in Ohio, USA!

              Please also read this:
              An American manufacturing success story.

              Click here: http://www.mosquitomagnet.com/

              then on the left click: Mosquit Magnet News

              then at the top/middle of the page click:
              "Mosquitos - A Business Opportunity"
              story dated March 17, 2002

              The bean counters should count beans - not run the company.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey, Chrysler IS built in Canada AND IS owned by a foreign company... Daimler as in Daimler-Chrysler...

                he he he smile

                Cheers Ivor Calgary CANADA

                Comment


                • #9
                  "Just be careful - you might end up driving a Canadian-built Chrysler (owned by a foreign company)."

                  Ford and SHIVVY both also have manufacturing plants in Canada just over the border in ontario as well .

                  I think it is a shame what this country has come to. Next thing you know there will be no manufacturing left here. What will we all do. I understand that we are a global economy where trade is great and gives lots of hard working americans a job and pride in their work. But there are other skilled and unskilled workers that will be left without a job. Also what about the the guy that works at Ridgid and takes pride in his work, walks into Home Depot and says "I made that". I would be glad to pay 100 or 200 dollars more if it was made here. That is something for all the head execs that make that 100,000 thousand to 500,000 thousand a year to think about!!!!!

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                  • #10
                    I whole heartledly agree with vacman. If a manufactuer advertised that their product was made and assembled in the USA with American parts, I will gladly pay more to own it and support our economy.

                    I know it is naive to think we can compete with the manufaturing costs of many foreign countries. Can we even buy a stereo made in the USA anymore? (I know I like Sony)...but when I have a choice, I do back up my feelings.... I like the Tundra, and believe it's a great truck, but I own a Ford F-150...(I also own a Craftsman Table Saw, made by Emerson in TN)

                    What is happening is we are losing the choice to buy truly American...

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                    • #11
                      You know what folks if nobody is working here in America nobody is going to by the stuff that all you manufacturers are farming out to other countries. I know the low paid workers in these other countries are not going to be able to afford the products. Then what are the greedy executives going to do? I'm sorry but I'm sick and tired of hearing about competeing on the world market when in most case's we the american public are the world market their talking about

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                      • #12
                        When the flare up comes between China & Taiwan & it will. According to several people I have met that have lived inside China. China is still mad because they lost Taiwan & they have been getting ready for several years for war. Where will you be then? HUH.....
                        Use safety devices or you may not need gloves.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Where the heck were you guys when I was standing alone against the "World Market Pollyanna"?--Jeff--oh all those laid-off workers are going to find better paying jobs---let's hope so or they won't want to buy the tons of Chinese junk flooding the market.

                          If it were only a matter of "having" a choice as to whether to buy American. Try to find Christmas lights or any leather product not made in China.

                          BTW---AirforceGuy---just bought a Tundra---it's made in Indiana.
                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Where a product is made is very important but even more important is where the profits are going. Buying a Tundra is good for the workers who made the vehicle. However the profits go to Toyota in Japan. Which increases that countries gross profits, provides money to buy more companies, provides money to invest and later control stocks. People if you can't see what is happening we are literally selling this country to the world. We have allowed most if not all important manufacturing (steel industry and machine tooling) to leave this country and now we are parting out the US to the highest bidder and they are using our money to buy it.
                            My two cents
                            Rev Ed

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                            • #15
                              A smarter dude than I am would stay out of this discussion, but . . . .

                              The sad fact of life is that most people -- perhaps not entirely everyone, but an overwhelming majority of us -- buy on price; you can see that just by reviewing some of the posts on this site. And as the difference in price between A, made in the United States, and B, made in Whonosewhere, grows larger, the number of people who will buy B over A on account of price increases. The trend doesn't have to extend very far before the manufacturer of A cannot sell enough of his product to cover his fixed costs, and he either retires or moves to Whonosewhere.

                              Now a major component of anything you buy is the labor hours that go into making it, so when you buy a table saw or plate joiner or pickup truck, what you are really buying is X number of labor hours. If the people who make table saws in the United States want $25/hr. (plus health and welfare plus medical plus a whole bunch of other benefits), but some folks in Whonosewhere are prepared to sell their labor for $1.98, guess what?

                              You can't have it both ways.

                              The cost of local labor has all but killed the sailboat business in the United States. Even the premium boats, like the Hood Little Harbors, have their hulls laid in Taiwan -- where, interestingly enough, the crews do a pretty good job for an awful lot less than their counterparts in the United States wanted. Indeed, I had lunch the other day with a guy who is having a new boat built in South Africa. The construction of the boat involves some 18,000 man-hours of labor. The embedded cost of that labor in South Africa is about $2/hr.

                              The solution to the problem of the United States exporting its industrial and manufacturing capabilities, which may indeed come to hurt us the next time we go to war (if not otherwise), is to have a large fraction of the population willing to pay a premium to buy United States made goods. Will everyone in the room willing to pay half-again as much for a U.S.-made tablesaw please raise their hands?

                              OK, you two guys are excused. As for the other hundred, the next time you complain about U.S. outfits fleeing to other shores and start looking around for the culprit, take a gander in the mirror.

                              Further your affiant sayeth naught.

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