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  • TS3650 Power Supply

    I was wondering if there is any benefit to changing my TS3650 from the standard 110/120 to 220? I'm getting ready to wire a dedicated circuit for it, but I'm not sure if its worth the trouble of changing the saw wiring. My father-in-law says its better for the saw, my father says its not worth the hassle and the guy at home depot said "You can change the voltage?" Help!

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 Power Supply

    I'm not sure there is any benefit to having it on a 220 volt, except giving it dedicated power from a circuit. I'm no electrician, so there maybe someone with more knowledge that chimes in. I can tell you that I setup (meaning had someone with electrical knowledge) a quad outlet on a dedicated 30 amp breaker running the 110/120 volt. I can have my tv going, air compressor, and table going at the same time and there is no drop in power. I use to have my CMS on a 15 amp breaker and when you turned it on, the lights would dim for a sec on start-up. When I got the table saw, it was suggested I move up to a dedicated 30 amp breaker. I also now have my CMS running on that quad outlet too.

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    • #3
      Re: TS3650 Power Supply

      This is a debate that'll rage on unresolved for the most part, but there's very little downside to making the switch if you're going to run a new line anyway. Theoretically, 110v or 220v will give identical performance if the circuits are up to snuff. The Ridgid has a 13 amp motor, which is typically pretty friendly to 110v circuits. But with that said, if I was going to bother to run a line, I'd go with 220v. 220v will allow you to use smaller gauge wire, a 220v line tends to have lower voltage drop, plus you never know when you'll actually need a 220v line for another motor later on. There are also some minor advantages in startup speed with 220v due to the huge amp draw during startup....that same advantage in startup speed should also help the saw recover faster when you bog it down in thick material.
      Last edited by hewood; 03-27-2008, 10:26 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: TS3650 Power Supply

        If you could get 110 or 220 to the saw equally you wouldn't see a difference (in theory at least). When you switch the motor from 110 to 220 you switch the coils on the motor from parallel to series, and the voltage and current in each of those windings would be exactly the same regardless (assuming perfect 110/220 V)

        The reason 220V CAN be better, is that electricity can be delivered more efficiently at 220V. I.e., if you run a 220V line to your saw, when operating it will see closer to the nominal voltage than it would if you had run 110V in the same size wire. Translation. Run heavy gauge 110V wire or smaller gauge 220V, and if your workshop is right next to the fuse panel, it's probably not worth the effort. It's really a site dependent thing. If you're running a dedicated line anyway, it's really up to you, but now would be the time to do it.

        Incidentally, "load balancing" to reduce your apparent electricity usage was recently brought up in this thread as another reason to go to 220V:
        http://www.canadianwoodworking.com/f...=162701&page=2
        I'm somewhat skeptical whether it's true or not, but can't be bothered to investigate further. I'm just doing this for fun and I'm plugged into a 110 socket right next to the fuse panel using a heavy gauge cord anyway and happy with the results.
        Last edited by tpwade; 03-28-2008, 03:24 PM.

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