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Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

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  • Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

    Was walking through my local HD today and took note that the Ridgid 13" planer sold for $399.00 and the Ryobi 13" planer sold for $199.00. The general specs looked similar so why the big price difference? Is the Ridgid that much better?
    Last edited by osgoor; 04-10-2008, 03:47 PM. Reason: sorry... wrong forum. Will post in correct forum

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

    I have the new Ridgid R4330 and would not step backwards if it were given to me. I love my Ridgid.
    ________
    Toyota origin history
    Last edited by newtowood; 02-10-2011, 11:04 PM.
    It is amazing how long it takes to complete a project you are not working on!

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

      Originally posted by newtowood View Post
      I have the new Ridgid R4330 and would not step backwards if it were given to me. I love my Ridgid.
      I have the Ridgid R4330 as well, and as I have not had the opportunity to pop that baby out of the box yet...I learned my lesson when I purchased the Ryobi Router Table Set (that came with a FREE router)...which was substantially cheaper than the the Ridgid Combo Set...which I later had to go back and purchase....

      ...lesson learned Bro'......lesson learned!
      (Lookin' through a family photo album with a friend)

      "....yeah...so...there's my mom, and next to her is my baby brother Jason...and the guy right there holding Jason...yeah...him...the one with only one hand is my uncle Tony "Tablesaw" Thomas.....guess why we call him "Tablesaw"....

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

        From what I can tell, both planers are good values for what they are.

        The Ryobi AP1301 is a very basic planer which does not have a cutterhead lock. This results in much more potential for snipe than planers that do not have them. If you are just looking to run a bunch of 6-8' boards through to final surfacing and dimension and you don't care if you might wind up having to toss the first or last couple inches, then there is nothing wrong with the Ryobi. If you are running a glued up panel that is cut to near final dimension through it, then any extra potential for snipe is unacceptable and you'll not like the Ryobi. Similar machines are the Grizzly 'lean and mean' 13" planer for $249, the Craftsman one in the $200-250 range, and Delta Shopmaster (the cheap one, forgot the item #)

        The Ridgid is a fairly high-end 3-blade cutter that seems to be designed to compete with the Dewalt 733/735 planers. It has a cutterhead supporting system that is a little different from the Dewalt and the $450 Delta. The extra $150 over the Ryobi gives you less potential for snipe, a heavier-duty machine that will probably last longer, and probably slightly better overall item quality in use.

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

          Also, if you can still find the 1300 planer you get a leg stand included which I think is a huge benefit. Its the one of the reasons I got it over the 4330.

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          • #6
            Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

            Originally posted by newtowood View Post
            I have the new Ridgid R4330 and would not step backwards if it were given to me. I love my Ridgid.
            Oh, so that's the difference!

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            • #7
              Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

              Thanks for the feedback guys. I think I'll save my pennies and go better than Ryobi.

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              • #8
                Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

                Osgoor,

                The Ryobi 1301 is considerably "cut-down" from thier previous model. The Ryobi AP1300 had some degree of popularity and was, to a degree, comparable to the previous Ridgid model. At the time, the price difference between the two was about $100. Although they used the same blades, and much of the same mechanical design, you could easily see why the Ridgid TP1300 was a better model. Components like the cutter head screws were heavier duty, there were some better features, and certainly the warranty and LLSA were better. Still, the Ryobi AP1300 offered a definite cost advantage, especially for the light-duty home woodworker who saw too many similarities in the design.

                In 2006, Ryobi stripped down the design, removing the infeed and outfeed tables, the top compartment tray, and a couple of other features. This trimmed the unit down considerably and made a big difference between the two units. I have yet to hear a positive comment about the Ryobi 1301... so I guess Ryobi and Home Depot did a good job of establishing something less competitive to the Ridgid TP1300.

                This past year, Ridgid introduced the new R4330. While hearing of its introduction, neither my store or this web site had not yet displayed any information, photos, etc. I bought the last Ridgid TP1300 my store had, with the thought that Ridgid's new R4330 might well be "stripped-down" like the Ryobi 1301.

                While I was wrong in that presumption (partly anyway... the R4330 doesn't have a cutter head lock), I still think I made the rigth choice with going with the proven and well-reputed TP1300.

                I hope this helps,

                CWS

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                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

                  I just bought the R4330 today so I will weigh in on it in a week or so. All I know is I was really wanting the DeWalt DW735 but i just couldnt swing the $170.00 differance while HD had the cash off eneded up with the R4330 for $309.00

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                  • #10
                    Re: Ridgid vs Ryobi planer

                    I own the Ryobi AP1300 and am happy enough with it, although I still wish I had bit the bullet and purchased the TP1300. For one thing, you can still get cutter blades for the Ridgid at HD, whereas the company seems to have divested itself from dealing with certain Ryobi accessories, including the AP1300 (stock number 290202-000) blades. In terms of solidity of construction the Ryobi seems to be pretty much on par with the Ridgid model. So far, I have not seen the newer Ridgid unit, however.

                    After reading some of the nightmare comments about removing blades from the AP1300 in some chat groups (comments often end up with the poster talking about grinding down screw heads and using easy outs or grinding screwdriver slots), I decided to remove and reinstall mine as a preliminary operation before they got so worn that I would be in serious straights in the middle of a project down the line.

                    Rather than use the supplied Ryobi wrench, or even a standard L-shaped allen wrench, I installed a premium 4 mm allen tip in my impact wrench and proceded to VERY easily remove each screw that way. An impact wrench basically jars the screws loose and does so before the head or tip can deform. I also pulled each blade and cleaned it and also cleaned the mounting bosses and clamps (acetone did the trick) and then reinstalled everything. The allen screws were absolutely pristine after this operation, and the blades were still sharp after considerable use.

                    My only beef against the planer, which has worked very well so far, is the cost of replacement blades. The price is considerably more than replacement blades for the more expensive Ridgid TP1300, which I find peculiar. Ryobi stuff is supposed to be reasonably priced. The Ridgid blades are also heftier and obviously cost more to make. However, the Ryobi blades still cost more.

                    Ryobi should be ashamed, although I am still decently satisfied with the AP1300.

                    Some have commented upon the newer Ryobi AP1301. While it has limitations, compared to the AP1300 (no cut-depth gauge, no in/out feed tables, no cutter lock), one thing it does have in its favor is that it apparently uses the same blades as the Ridgid TP1300. At least you can get those (so far) at Home Depot.

                    Howard Ferstler

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