Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Can you recommend the Ridgid Drill Press? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can you recommend the Ridgid Drill Press?

    I am in the market for a drill press and have had my eye on the Ridgid model and would like to get some feedback from everyone on their drill press and the Ridgid Model. I am open to suggestions here; I just want to get a good drill press.

    Thanks,

    Eric

  • #2
    The most overrated tool IMO can be the drill press. If all you need one for is to drill everyday type holes in wood than almost any DP with very little runout will do the job. In my shop I do very little drilling in metal, no pen making, and so far, no M&T with my drill press. My DP is a 1HP, 16 speed, floor style, made in China no-name that cost me $150. It serves me well and if or when I decide to work with metals, or do M&T joints with it, not sure about pen making [img]smile.gif[/img] , I'm sure it would be up to the task.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      BD has a very good point. HFT has good prices on DP's. They work for most drilling....


      BUT....... (ain't there always a but) if you plan on doing drill out for mortise, long bores for lamps or pens, then I would consider a real good DP. I build furniture, and my DPis a bench top. The Rigid is one I would consider if I wanted a floor model though. One of the things I like about it is the larger base that it comes with. Makes the DP loads more stable.
      Support Our Troops!
      www.mnpatriotguard.org
      www.patriotguard.org

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the feedback so far. [img]smile.gif[/img] I am defintely going to be drilling mortise's, a lot. I like the floor design over the bench top and I have a lot of space so that is not an issue. Working with metal is a possiblity since I drag race quite a bit.

        Keep them coming.

        Eric

        Comment


        • #5
          if your drilling "lots" of mortices do yoour self a favor and get a dedicated moritser they do work better I use my delta for "occasional " mortising and its fine but "lots" would lead me to a mortiser

          Comment


          • #6
            I have the DP1550. It's great for drilling all kinds of holes, metel and wood, and everything in between. I also have the mortise attachment by Ridgid. I used it twice, then bought the shop fox bench top mortiser. (Only because I could not afford the General HD mortiser at the time I needed reliable accurate mortises) The attachment for the DP is not a high quality unit. Time consuming, and not that accurate.

            The DP1550 is dual voltage, and mine will be converted this off construction season (winter) to 220.

            If your looking for a machine to mortise with, invest your big dollars in a mortiser. If you looking for a spindle sander, Shop Fox and Grizzly make really nice ones. Harbor Freight also makes a dandy, but I have not seen it in action to testify about for alot less $$.

            If you looking for a "Drill Press". You can't go wrong with the Ridgid DP1550. As stated, it's mounting tabs on it's base makes it a very stable machine.

            Known problems is spindle bearing alignment on assembly, idler pully alignment, and motor mount alignment. All "tweeking" to the individual users as we call it.

            IMHO, no machine comes RTU out of the box. You buy it off the lot, take it home, and detail it out to your specifications. The DP1550 IS WELL WORTH THE MONEY, as a "Drill Press".
            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

            Comment


            • #7
              If you go the Ridgid route, make sure to get the 1550 not the 1500. The upgrades are significant (mainly a TEFC motor).

              I could not get the 1550 (spent 3 weeks wih Home Depot and Ridgid trying to get the 1550 and not the 1500 in a city with 30+ Home Depots). So after wasting so much time I said screw Ridgid and got the Jet. It had all the features I wanted with the slightly bigger motor and depth stop I prefer. The Jet is a good machine, solid, and performs as advertised but isn't much to write home about. Tolerences and fit and finish (feel) on Ridgid products seem better and have exceded my expectations for the price. Luckily I got the Jet (usually $100 more than the Ridgid) for less than the Ridgid so I don't feel bad about my purchase.

              When researching DP's I heard of some problems with runout on the grizzley and with the pulleys. Just thought I would mention it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am having the same problem with home despot looking for a 3612 ts....but anyway...consider a used shopsmith as both a lathe and dedicated horizontal boring machine..(I mean if you are doing a lot of "boring" work lol) the shopsmith is great for accurate horizontal boring. just a thought.
                \"Aarrgh, sliver me timbers\"<br /><a href=\"http://www.picturetrail.com/daviddunlap\" target=\"_blank\">www.picturetrail.com/daviddunlap</a>

                Comment


                • #9
                  I picked up the DP1550 over the weekend. Just set it up last night. I was going to go with the Grizzly DP because I got their new Bandsaw, the G0555, and I was impressed with it.
                  I think it was the good write ups that swayed me toward the Ridgid. That, and I also have the TS2424. So Ridgid has made an impression on me too. So far the only thing that I was a little concerned about with the DP1550 was the Idler pulley. It was off around 1/32 of an inch. But when I cranked it up it was smooth and quiet. I also ran it with a 2" Forstner bit simliar to the test they did in Woodworker's Journal. Considering it only has a 1/2 HP. This machine is plenty strong. I think you'll like it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Ridgid DP has received many good reviews. The fit-n-finish are great and I really leaned heavily toward getting it as I have a Ridgid TS2424 and the 12" compound miter saw. Not to mention a Ridgid shop vac/leaf blower!

                    But I eventually decided against the Ridgid DP. I had read one comparison where it was considered a little under powered (though it really probably would have been sufficient for me). The depth stop, though being better than others of its kind from what I've read still didn't appeal to me as much as the post type on the Delta and Jet drill presses I had looked at. I wrestled over the DP decision for some time. I had almost convinced myself to go with the Jet JDP-17MF 16 speed floor standing model when I had a chance to examine the new and improved 16 speed Delta 17-965 floor model. I really liked the quick-adjust depth stop, the longer stroke and a little more horsepower (3/4). I got a great deal on a special sale (running at the same time as a nearby woodworking show) and Delta was throwing in the mortising kit for free. I like it so far but I have not yet had a chance to REALLY put it through its paces. In the process of building a new garage/workshop. My new little "backyard retreat". [img]smile.gif[/img]

                    [ 07-28-2003, 09:07 AM: Message edited by: George ]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not sure if this is accurate information. I was Emailed that Emerson rates it's HP by 50% load, not load free. That would put Emerson's 1/2 HP DP motor at near 3/4 HP load free.

                      I know I did the 2" Forstner bit test as well, in Oak. I didn't stall the motor, but nearly tipped the darn thing over trying. Like I said, it's well worth the investment as a Drill Press! The bit I used was brand new, in the set from Hickory, from the people who make Viper Router Bits.
                      John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For what its worth the current issue of WOOD magazine has a mini review of the 1550 on page 96. It gets generally good press.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by UO_Woody:
                          Not sure if this is accurate information.
                          Don't get me wrong, I'm not bashing the Ridgid DP. I think it's great. I don't have the magazine handy at the moment that did the comparison but I believe that it was "Woodworker's Journal". The article said they felt it was a little under powered in their load tests. The article was kind of an odd comparison actually. Instead of selecting machines with similar capabilities and features they picked a variety of machines from different classes. I have nothing against the Ridgid DP. And like GARYC said, it gets good press. I was just explaining how I arrived at my choice of the Delta. And I still like the depth stop and length of stroke on the Delta better. The depth stop is a matter of preference. The length of stroke is a matter of need. As I recall, the new Ridgid 1550 can bore through a 4x4 in one stroke now where (as I had read in another article) the 1500 couldn't. The 1550 should fill the typical woodworker's needs.

                          [ 07-29-2003, 09:07 AM: Message edited by: George ]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The spindle travel on the 1550 is 3-3/4", so it should be able to go through the typical 4x4 in one stroke. The comparison in that one article with the different presses didn't really seem fair to me, either. Fine Woodworking had a more objective test, IMO, and it rated the Ridgid very well. I bought mine after reading both FWW and the other article. Keep in mind that the Ridgid also uses those poly-v drive belts, which should transmit power better than the typical belts. They also slip less and transmit less vibration, in my experience. That should also help balance any difference between the 1/2 and 3/4 HP units.

                            The fit-and-finish on the Ridgid is nicer than any of the similarly priced DP's ($300-$400) I was able to check out locally. At $300, the Ridgid is a good buy. If you can spend $100 more, you can get a few more features and perhaps be happier. For example, the $400 Delta 17-965 has a spindle travel of 4-7/8 in., which could be important for some people. Jet also has one that goes over 4 inches.

                            [ 07-29-2003, 09:58 AM: Message edited by: Stuart H ]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I thought the comparisons in the Woodworker's Journal was a little uneven too. But I believe the fact the Ridgid DP was included with that group was saying something. I think I got a good DP for $300. Although, To be honest. If I had found the Delta 17-965 on sale with the mortising kit, I would have gone with that too.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X