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Tell Me Why I Shouldn't Buy This Saw

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  • Tell Me Why I Shouldn't Buy This Saw

    Hi,

    I have fallen in love with Dewalt's table saw with sliding miter sled and extended ripping capabilities.

    Is this a popular saw? It is quite expensive! Total cost about $1500.

    This is one of the few saws that can be lowered for a wheelchair user (motor not in base). The miter sled would allow me to crosscut without getting too close to the blade.

    What do you guys think of this unit?

    Mike

  • #2
    If its what you want than I say go for it. Delta makes top notch stuff and from what I hear their Customer Service is quite well respected also.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Michael, I assume you are refering to the DeWalt 746. But, I am left confused for two reasons, both revolving around this sentence:

      This is one of the few saws that can be lowered for a wheelchair user (motor not in base).

      First, the motor in the 746 is in the same place as most every cabinet saw. That is, roughly below the blade. Other contractor's saws have the motor mounted even higher, roughly directly behind the blade.

      Second is of more concern, and that is having to lower it. Of all the contractor's style tablesaws built, the DeWalt 746 and the Jet SuperSaw would be the -hardest- to lower.



      Referring to the picture above, note that the 746 legs are continuous from floor to just under the table. The only way to lower this saw is to cut the legs off. Other contractor's saws could be much more easily lowered by simply placing them on a shorter leg set, they all are sitting on a leg set that is pretty similar.

      The sliding table (not a miter sled, which is not permanently attached to the saw like a sliding table is) is a great idea. Several companies sell universal mount models. Off the top of my head, Rockler, Grizzly, Excalibur, Exaktor are companies to investigate. More information if you're interested.

      The DW746 is a fine saw, but I think it is not the best choice based on your stated need.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Dave, What I meant by being easy to lower was that the saw base/motor was not enclosed in a cabinet that went to the floor like some of the other saws in the showroom.

        "Other contractor's saws could be much more easily lowered by simply placing them on a shorter leg set, they all are sitting on a leg set that is pretty similar"

        True, but what about tables or outfeed tables? They would still need to be lowered. On the Dewalt the extension and outfeed tables would all be cut to the same length.

        The demo I saw was fitted with all available accessories.

        I was not aware of after market sliding tables. Do you use one of them?

        Comment


        • #5
          the saw base/motor was not enclosed in a cabinet that went to the floor like some of the other saws in the showroom

          Then you were looking exclusively at cabinet saws. I do agree that a 746 is easier to lower than a cabinet saw.

          but what about tables or outfeed tables?

          I don't entirely understand the question or objection. The table of a saw is attached to the saw, it rises and falls accordingly. If there were ancillary legs, one would do exactly the same as on the DeWalt, make them shorter.

          I do not use an aftermarket sliding table. I use a miter gauge on my own saw. When I really need a sliding table, a friend has a European panel tablesaw with a Format slider.

          In the following picture of a Ridgid tablesaw, you can see the demarcation between the main saw cabinet and the leg set, it the horizontal line right above the name RIDGID. These are entirely separate pieces, so a lower stand could easily be provided. This is the ordinary way a contractor's tablesaw is built, other the the DW746 and Jet SuperSaw (and a couple others that are out of production).



          Dave

          Comment


          • #6
            Michael,

            It seams like 1500 bucks is alot to spend if your not sure it will work for you.

            Like the RAS, you can mount the TS3612, or any other Ridgid table saw on the Universal stand to work for you. You might even be able to use the lift system on the universal stand as well.

            You can also get miter gauges with locking mechanisms that hold the stock for you. And I'm sure coming up with a inexpensive home made sliding table is not out of the question.

            I would hate to see you spend that much money and be disappointed. I remember reading a post a while back where the owner of a DeWalt saw said it was very hard, or impossable to install a dado set on his DeWalt saw. This should also be a consideration. My TS2424 is very easy to change blades, or install a dado set on.
            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't say this is accurate first hand info, however, I was talking to a guy who works for an outfit specializing in hardwood stairs. He told me that a couple of guys had been bringing back dewalt table saws because of the plastic mechanisims in the fence breaking.

              I still like the bosch.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well...I did ask you guys to tell me why I shouldn't buy this saw

                Dave & Woody, thanks for your thoughts and info. I'll look at the Rigids again.

                Mike

                Comment


                • #9
                  Having a friend that is in a wheelchair, I spent awhile looking at both those pictures, trying to see what would be important to him. The vertical legs on the Dewalt are better than the Ridgids angled ones, but after shortening up, a minor difference. The Ridgids nooks and crannies seem more accessable, for cleaning and blade changes. Those controversial webbed extensions may actually be more helpful for grip and support.
                  My gut feeling is that the 3612 can do the job for you while saving a lot of dough! HTH.
                  \"Is it Friday yet?\"

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