Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
workbench top Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • workbench top

    ok using theses measure ments from this plan

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/home...61.html?page=1

    would like to use pine to build the following


    http://www.amazon.com/the-editors-WO.../ref=de_a_smtd

    I could have an option for drawers or cubbers underneath.

    can I make th top out of two x fours glued up, I could glue upa few then plane them, (4330) then glue them all together.

    any ideas would be appreciated ..... still in the planning stage.

    §m€llŸ™

  • #2
    Re: workbench top

    Smelly

    Go to a good serious lumber yard and ask them about solid core inside doors. They make a nice bench top. You may need to have it cut, and be sure to seal it all up with clear poly varnish to keep moisture out of it. Please note you want one with full birch veneer on it. Then seal it after getting it to size. Be sure there are no hollow zones for locks and the such. You need it totally solid.

    The other choice that works well is to get a commercial made bench top ready made. Trying to make a good one at home is a real chore and PITA.

    If I just wanted a lower cost ruff & tuff top, I would use 2 layers of 3/4 (so called as it's not really 3/4 anymore) and 1/4 hardboard on top. Glue the two sheets (pre cut to size) together well with a good wood glue. Then use small brads to hold the hardboard in place. After it gets bashed up, pry it up and replace. Do be sure to countersink the brads.

    As for trying to make a bench top out of commercial 2 x 4s, you can, but for all the work, you'll be frustrated when they warp and split. It's just not worth the big PITA.

    Some lumber yards have or can order in butcher block tops in yellow pine, birch, white oak and the all too famous rock maple. These are factory made using machinery there's just no way a home woodworker can afford. Be sure to demand that it be factory sealed too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: workbench top

      well then Woussko, I will have to go see the bro in law ,and have him cut me down some surgar maples, and resaw them , dry em out , and get me wood for the bench,

      will find out when is best time to cut , by surfing the net

      §m€llŸ™

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: workbench top

        Me bad old howling hound.

        I didn't click the links and had in mind you wanted a simple flat slab top like for a regular steel leg industrial bench. After seeing the pictures and more, I now have in mind you want all the features of the one in PM Magazine. In that case the idea of cutting down trees, drying them, sawing, drying more and such is part of the fun. Be sure to use a 2 man saw and ax to cut down the trees and NO using any manor of power tools. Do everything the old timer Grunt & Groan way. My bet is soon you'll give up and go for something simple and easy.

        Good luck with this project. What you go for really depends on just what you want to end up with and how much grunt & groan you're willing to put into the bench project.
        Last edited by Woussko; 04-15-2008, 05:13 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: workbench top

          well grunting and groaning is all part of the fun.....
          I do that in bed too


          §m€llŸ™

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: workbench top

            Pine will work okay but will be easy to ding. The upside is that its inexpensive and also easy to resurface with a hand plane or belt sander. You can also cover it with a piece of tempered hardboard for a disposible top. Some things to consider:

            If using pine, SYP (Southern Yellow Pine) is better than the Borg SPF (Spruce Pine Fir) grade (less splinters and stronger). To get SYP at a builders supply you will probably have to go to a 2 x 8 or 2 x 10 instead of 2 x 4. If you get the flatsawn ones, rip them to 3" or so, and set them on edge, you will have a quartersawn top less prone to warping and thick enough for using grammercy clamps, bench dogs etc. If you can get the top surface grains all running the same direction (whether flat or quarter sawn) it will be much easier to handplane them without tearout. (DAMHIKT)
            If you are planning to use hand planes, etc, you will want it solid, so weighing down the bottom with drawers and/or heavy tools will be a plus.
            I would use harder wood for the vise faces, tho (Rock maple, white oak, etc).

            Best time to cut trees is from late fall through winter. That way they can start the initial drying without losing too much moisture too fast (resulting in splits, checks, cracks, etc). In warmer weather they are more full of moisture and raw sap, and the temp is higher, so you have a lot of rapid moisture loss. After the moisture gets down to 25% or less, the rate of moisture loss can be increased somewhat with less fear of damage. Depends on wood species as to amount of loss per day without damage. Seal the ends as soon as they are felled and cut to length. You can cut them in warmer weather, but leave the bark on and slab them in the cooler weather. After you get them slabbed to 8/4, plan on a year or two (air drying) to get them down to 12%, which is about when you can start using them for outside or garage type projects with least warpage, etc.
            Might as well build the pine bench, as it will come in handy building the sugar maple one several years from now (cut trees next winter, slab out and wait a couple years for air drying and the hernias to heal, etc). Biggest problem I had building mine was that I found I sure could have used a good bench to make one!!

            Seriously, one advantage to making it first of pine is that you can use it to make a top of better material, and by using it, you will see all the things you would change if you did it again. I would also add to get your vise hardware first, because the difference in what you are able to get vs the stock plans can make for some interesting design modifications.

            Go
            Last edited by Gofor; 04-15-2008, 09:39 PM.
            Practicing at practical wood working

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: workbench top

              I made mine out of a solid core door. I trimmed it to length and covered the open end with a 1 x 2 (glued and nailed). I then bought apair of folding legs to mount it on, and fitted a pair of casters on one end so I can stand it on end, fold the legs and stow it away. It works good for light projects.
              I used the remaining piece (20" X 30") to make a coffee table. Skirted it with some left over crown moulding and mounted some store bought legs. After finishing with poly-urthane the wife put a piece of glass on it. Looks
              very nice.
              Good Luck, BobW

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: workbench top

                Go,
                You could send Smelly a pine cone. Then he could raise the bence from a seedling making sure the tree is pruned properly(reduce knots), gets even sun for straight growth before he cuts it with the 2-man saw. Because there are no power tools involved, he'll have to skid out the wood with horses, too.

                I like the solid core door idea.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: workbench top

                  how about sun growlamps with the pine cones.... then I could smoke home grown tobacco while I wait for the tree to grow


                  §m€llŸ™

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: workbench top

                    Originally posted by smelly View Post
                    how about sun growlamps with the pine cones.... then I could smoke home grown tobacco while I wait for the tree to grow


                    That would work, but you want to grow the sapling in a tube so that it only gets light from straight up.(like in a tall forest setting). That way it will grow straight and tall without branching out to get all those nasty knots. Need a long extension cord and a tall ladder to change the lights when it gets up to about 60'. Then you can start letting it expand the trunk diameter so you can get some usable wood. OR you can come get the 7' logs I have in the back yard from a 75 footer that blew down 3 weeks ago. Its straight and solid, and big enough to get a bench out of it. Just an old loblolley, but should work okay
                    If you come in July, you can pick up plenty of tobacco leaves along side the roads that blow off the wagons during the harvest. You'll need to cure it some, but its free!!

                    Go
                    Last edited by Gofor; 04-16-2008, 07:46 PM.
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: workbench top

                      ya well that sounds fine start cutting it up
                      §m€llŸ™

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X