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  • #16
    Re: New Member

    And you can get the car wheel weights that peel and stick.

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    • #17
      Re: New Member

      . . . or drill through and use a bolt to hold a few washers on.

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      • #18
        Re: New Member

        Most bandsaw wheels are non-ferrous (aluminum/pot-metal), so magnets wouldn't work. Also it's been my experience very little weight is required, either in removing or adding, to achieve balance.

        ---Mike

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        • #19
          Re: New Member

          Originally posted by Nature_Photog View Post
          Couldn't small weights simply be added to the light portion(s) of the wheel?

          Double sided tape would hold them/it on initially, and then epoxied in place.

          ---Mike
          Yes... this will work also, but I dont like the fact you have something glued on your wheel. If you ever look at a bandsaw wheel that has been balanced from the factory, they drill them. This way, you dont have any risk of failure of the bond between the weight and the wheel.

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          • #20
            Re: New Member

            I also feel uncomfortable with stick on or glue on weight. Just like balancing high speed crankshafts. You drill and add melted lead to the holes. If its stuck or glued on it will loose its bond at some point in time thanks to Murphy and his Laws...

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            • #21
              Re: New Member

              Just a thought, but have you considered grinding away some of the inner triangle? Seems you will get more material with it spread out a little.

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              • #22
                Re: New Member

                One method for adding weight without drilling is to wrap the spoke(s) closest to the top with copper wire. Start with the wire out to the rim. If close but too heavy, slide it in toward the hub. Hold in place with duct tape until you get balanced, and then secure it with some 5 min epoxy. Its a reversible method for when you find the drive pulley is really the culprit (on the drive wheel), or the tire out of round was really the problem all along. If the heavy spot is between spokes, wrap the top two, with most the weight on the one closest to the top.
                Lead foil tape also works if you can find some.

                Removing the wheel completely and setting it on a round steel rod slightly smaller than the diameter (rod held in vise, etc horizontal) will eliminate any drag induced by tight bearings.

                Go
                Last edited by Gofor; 04-17-2008, 07:01 PM.
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #23
                  Re: New Member

                  I dont have a band saw yet but I dont see why not someone could just make some metal snap weights that could be inserted in the inner of the wheel like the ones in the car rims. Once you find the actual balance spot you could just epoxy them in place. Someone really picky could actually take the well assemby to a wheel aligment shop or a machine shop and put it on a balancing machine so the technician could point to you where exactly you should place the weight. A balancing machine will even tell you how much weight you have to add to balance it right. Also if you want to drill theres a better idea that we use when balancing propellers.Take the wheel and do around 6 to 10 holes around the outter rim and make sure that the holes are at the same distance from each other.Now take a small bolt ,a corresponding nut and a lot of shims of uniform weight.Put some shims in the area that you suspect will balance the wheel(in both sides of the wheel ,with the inner shims touching the metal being plastic so they wont scratch the wheel), held by the nut and bolt and tighten them and make the wheel turn untill it is balanced. Its a trial and error way but you can keep adding shims to any of the holes you made untill you find the necessary balance.If you divide visually the wheel in 4 cuadrants you can add or remove the shims more methodically.Usually its just a part of the wheel that will be more heavy than the other and it shouldnt be by much if its a cast/machined wheel so you should be able to find the spot and correct it by this method.This way you dont have to keep drilling a lot of holes in just one side to balance it but just add weight with the shims in the opposite side and just make a fixed number of holes around the rim. Good luck.
                  Last edited by Raziel; 04-17-2008, 10:57 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Re: New Member

                    Guys... just drill the wheels. Its how every bandsaw manufacturer that balances the wheels does it. Every bandsaw book I have says drill the wheels. Dont add weights. Drilling is a simple process and it works quickly. You dont have the possibility of a weight coming off at speed.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: New Member

                      The method I described is used in aviation for balancing propellers on turboprop aircraft. If you choose your hardware wisely and use fiber lock nuts or just tight your nut enough ,THEY WONT COME OFF. They dont come off in propellers having a mass weight superior to what your whole bandsaw weights. If you choose to keep drilling your wheel untill you find the balance ,you could end up with 6 or 7 holes in just one place on the wheel and then if it doesnt fix it, you cant just fill them back(or you could but it would be more difficult and will create a new unbalance point).I gave this method as a trial and error method in which you just put a fixed amount of holes in the wheel. If you dont own electronic balancing equipment, this is the best method for not torturing your wheel more than you want.

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                      • #26
                        Re: New Member

                        Originally posted by Raziel View Post
                        The method I described is used in aviation for balancing propellers on turboprop aircraft. If you choose your hardware wisely and use fiber lock nuts or just tight your nut enough ,THEY WONT COME OFF. They dont come off in propellers having a mass weight superior to what your whole bandsaw weights. If you choose to keep drilling your wheel untill you find the balance ,you could end up with 6 or 7 holes in just one place on the wheel and then if it doesnt fix it, you cant just fill them back(or you could but it would be more difficult and will create a new unbalance point).I gave this method as a trial and error method in which you just put a fixed amount of holes in the wheel. If you dont own electronic balancing equipment, this is the best method for not torturing your wheel more than you want.
                        I agree with Razil on this. Drilling is an action that there is not turning back from. You can't reverse it easily if you get it wrong. Search for other threads on the RIDGID Bandsaw, some good ideas on balancing were presented here and there are others in some other threads. Before you drill know all your options. Adding weights (yes plural) is a viable option that should not be overlooked. Trying to balance the wheel using one weight is tough. It is much easier to obtain balance using two weights.
                        • Find the heavy spot based on repeated spins (a dozen or more).
                        • Go 180 degrees from there and mark a pencil mark.
                        • Take your two weights (use some U-Style Clip-On Nuts, search www.mcmaster.com) and space them out a couple inches from your mark (the light spot).
                        • Spin the wheel again, the same number of times as when you started. Where is the heavy spot? Did it move...to where?
                        • Evaluate and reposition your weights.
                        • If the heavy spot is still in the same relative area then move your two weights closer together or use slightly heavier weights, try to keep them 20 degrees apart for best effect and not go out beyond 45 degrees between the two weights.
                        • Also you must position the weights as close to the center line of the wheel as possible, any offset will induce wobble.
                        Did any of you ever do a static bubble balance of a wheel and tire assembly for a car? I literally did thousands when I was in HS. I worked in a tire shop (Goodyear) for a few years after school and during the summer. Computerized spin balance was as far off as cell phones, motorized spin balance was just starting to make itself known. Because of the width of the wheel we used four weights to get a good balance. On the Bandsaw wheel you can place the weights on axis so this should not be a problem. I did this on my old Craftsman BS years ago and it has worked well. Its also how the wheel was originally balanced by the manufacturer, who by the way was Emerson, RIDGID's parent company.
                        Adding weights is totally reversible, drilling is not and could void your warranty.

                        Don't just blindly drill where others have drilled before.
                        Last edited by Bob D.; 08-27-2008, 06:25 PM.
                        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: New Member

                          HI
                          I belong to another group where a member bought the ridgid 14002 bandsaw and had a vibration problem I am posting his message to that group in its entirety and his solution to the problem. I do not own any Ridgid product.

                          Hi folks, I just wanted to pass on some information that I learned
                          while trying to get the vibration out of my Ridgid BS14002 band saw.
                          When I bought the saw, I didn't know it was notorious for vibration.
                          Well, I read every article I could about what others had to say about
                          the problem. I also called Ridgid. They were nice, but didn't seem to
                          have an answer either. All they said was a new model would be coming
                          out soon that addresses the vibration problem. Well, that's no good;
                          what about my investment now?

                          I started with aligning the top and bottom wheels. The blade would
                          track in the middle of the top wheel, but it was almost on the front
                          edge of the bottom wheel. Ridgid advised me that I could take the
                          bottom wheel off and add a washer, or two if necessary, behind the
                          wheel to push it farther out. I finally found a washer that fit at a
                          local auto parts store. That did the trick. Now I was tracking in the
                          middle of both wheels.

                          Next I replaced the rubber tires with urethane ones. At the same
                          time, I checked the top and bottom wheels for balance. The top wheel
                          was as good as a human can get one, but the bottom one was a little
                          out of balance. I didn't address this issue yet. The vibration didn't
                          seem to be getting any better.

                          I then replaced the belt with a link type belt. I have heard good
                          things about link belts. Using a little imagination, the vibration
                          got a little better, but not a whole lot. I also added a bag of sand
                          to a shelf I built on the lower frame of the saw. I thought that
                          would stabilize it some. I have heard of turners doing this to their
                          lathes, so what the heck, give it a try. The vibration was still
                          there.

                          At this point, please keep in mind that the vibration was not very
                          much, but it was there. For example, there was too much vibration to
                          attempt cutting a band saw box. If I were rough cutting shapes, the
                          vibration would probably be acceptable. But, now it has become a
                          challenge to find out what the problem is.

                          Then I noticed that the motor seemed to shake somewhat on the thick
                          rubber bushings between the motor and the frame. For some unexplained
                          reason, I decided to take out those thick rubber bushings and see
                          what happened. Normally, one would not do this because the rubber
                          bushings are supposed to muffle the vibration. Well, guess what?
                          After bolting the motor directly to the steel frame, I turned the saw
                          on. There was not enough vibration to even notice. I guess sometimes
                          going against common wisdom pays off.

                          The last thing I did was to loosen the allen screw that holds the
                          larger of the two belt pulleys so the pulley could slide back and
                          forth on the shaft and turned the saw on. This causes the belt to
                          align the front pulley exactly where it needs to be for perfect
                          alignment.

                          I hope I didn't bore anyone, but I had such a time with this saw, I
                          wanted to offer my adventures with it in hopes of helping someone
                          else.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: New Member

                            I'm glad to see it isn't just me.

                            About a year ago I replaced my ancient Delta "portable" 10" saw with the Ridgid table saw, and I have been VERY happy with it ever since. I had been wanting to get a 14" bandsaw, and from what I had read here from its generally positive reviews, I bought the BS14002 about 2 weeks ago.l

                            Due to work, I had to wait until this weekend to put it together - and as many have said, there was a LOT of vibration - and the cut was very ragged.

                            So far I have realigned the saw and the motor so that the belt path is absolutely straight and not sheared off at an angle, and have realligned the blade per instructions. When cutting, the tracking seems very close to spot on. (In a "former life", I used to have to design, assemble and sometimes build my own laboratory apparatii so I'm usually pretty good with tools and electricity.)

                            (I also wanted to thank whoever first suggested using the quickclamps to help with retensioning the motor belt - a great idea :-)

                            Anyway I was left with a three of questions. One I'll take up with customer service but the other two seem appropriate here.

                            First a personal observation. The blade that came with it is ... well pretty bad. At the weld there was a lump of metal sticking out on the inside of the blade just under 0.5 mm thick, and the backs of the sections of blade above and below the weld were 0.735 mm out of alignment (tooth to back of blade offset). This did not make for a smooth cut by any means - and it made a LOT of noise. Being very careful and using graduated files I removed most of the metal on the inside of the blade at the "lump" and then smoothed it down, finally finishing with 600 grit sandpaper (wet with oil - and yes I removed the oil before I put back on the saw). The back alignment I cannot do anything about, but at least the "lumpectomy" made it usable temporarily until I can get a decent blade.

                            I was going to try the static balance test on the machine, but when I remove the blade, even before loosening the nut which holds the wheel on its hub, without the blade to pull against it, the wheel starts scraping against the upper housing - making checking wheel balance impossible ON the machine. This leads me to the question, WHAT THE ???? - IS THIS NORMAL? There's no rubbing when the blade is in place and the machine is running, but I'm wondering if something here could be contributing to the vibration.

                            Although I know that 3/4 HP is not enough for serious resawing, I would still like to get a riser block (kit) for a couple of projects I am planning. People have mentioned the Grizzly (http://www.grizzly.com/products/H3051) and AT $69.95 plus S+H it isn't terribly expensive, but I have also found the Ridgid kit on their website (http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/AC5005.phtml). I can download the manual for it, but trying to find its cost leads to a screen telling me that AC5005 is an invalid product number ... So does anyone know if it is even still available? And if it is, how much it costs?

                            On its page (http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/AC5001.phtml) the Ridgid fence doesn't look all that great, and I get the same lack-of-information on its price or availability. So I suspect that may be no longer available. I can get the Kreg bandsaw fence with the micro adjuster for around $120 at Amazon. Does anyone know a cheaper source? Also does the Kreg (or the table) need any modifications to use on the BS14002?

                            So I'm left with 2 questions. First coolblocks... I have read a couple of books by "experts" (and several articles) who disagree on whether the metal blocks are better than the coolblocks. Suggestions appreciated. I'm leaning against trying them until I have done the other changes. Suggestions?

                            My other question is about blades. I'm going to get a decent 3/8" and 1/2" blades, but I'm wondering whether this saw can actually use the 1/16" blade (which would pretty much eliminate the need to get a scrollsaw)? Same question for the 3/4" blade ...

                            Also from looking 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" blades up on line (and I won't be ordering them until I put in the riser block and see how good or bad the blade that comes with it is ...) I notice several different tpi's for each width and am wondering what is best for "general use"? Suggestions please?

                            (And yes I have read the name confusion about Timberwolf vs. Viking ...)

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: New Member

                              This is a follow-up to my post from last night.

                              I just spoke with Ridgid (the order line at 800-474-3443) and asked about:

                              (a) the Ridgid Riser block kit ...

                              It is currently on factory back-order; it costs $159.95 plush S&H; and they have no idea when it will come in (The anticipated date is JANUARY 2009 - a date 4 months in the past?????);

                              (b) the Ridgid fence ...

                              It is also currently on factory back-order; it costs $85.95 plus S&H; again, they have no idea when it will come in; and this time the anticipated date when they may know when it might come in is June 2009 (are there enough weasel words in that sentence?).

                              I now see why both were described elsewhere here as being overpriced (or possibly discontinued) :-(

                              Are there any other fences out there to consider besides the Kreg?

                              Thanks

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: New Member

                                Originally posted by airedad View Post
                                Are there any other fences out there to consider besides the Kreg?

                                Thanks

                                I think Lowes carries a delta fence for around $100.

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