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  • New Member

    Hello,

    I was searching for info on the RIDGID 14" Bandsaw and came across this forum. I just finished assembly late last night and turned it on for the first time. I think I will have to go through the suggestions on the forum here to minimize the vibration. Hopefully I made a smart decision on the BS1400 but will take it back if I cannot get it running smoothly.

    I used an old swim platform to build myself a spear gun for my diving activities.

    Here is a link to my project.

    http://www.spearboard.com/showthread.php?t=55829

  • #2
    Re: New Member

    It's a pretty darn decent bandsaw, with some add-ons and tuning.

    I've figured you need to spend about $70 minimum (urethane tires, good quality blade, link belt) to get it cutting true and smooth. The rest of the add-ons are optional: guide blocks, fence..

    The most important things I found that improved the bandsaw's performance were:
    - Balancing the wheels and getting them coplanar (no cost)
    - Adding the link belt (You need just a bit over 3 feet ~$7 per foot.. )
    - Urethane tires (~$25)
    - Quality blade (~$18)

    Here's a link to a larger discussion of the bandsaw, as well my my overview.
    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...t=13847&page=2
    Last edited by Wood_Junkie; 04-15-2008, 03:53 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New Member

      Thanks,

      I had already read your post. I plan to balance the wheels tonight and get some better vibration groments. The ones that came with it just colapsed with a bit of force to keep the motor in place, maybe I put a little too much force on them...

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New Member

        Hi Prater, welcome to the forums!

        I've had my BS1400 for a couple years now and it's working ok. I've added the link belt which helped immensely. I also got a couple good blades for various tasks. A nice 3TPI 1/2" for resawing and a thin 1/8" higher TPI for curve cuts. Both are Timberwolf brand. I highly recommend them.

        I need to spend time and balance the wheels. At that time, I'll replace the tires with urethane ones. This is a task I've been meaning to do, but haven't gotten around to yet.

        I've been successful in resawing some maple and some walnut with the saw. My pieces have been around 5" tall and I've been able to resaw to 1/8" with good results. I took my time and went through the process to find the proper angle for the fence first, and have been happy with the setup. I think balancing the wheels and the urethane tires will only improve a fairly decent saw.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New Member

          Welcome - I am a diver as well! Havent been doing it that long but have somewhere around 40 dives under my belt. By far its one my favorite things to do, just dont get to do it enough though.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New Member

            I've been reading this thread with interest and have a question.
            Will someone explain to me how you balance the wheels on a band saw?
            Thanks in advance.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New Member

              Just curious how much you had to take out of the wheel.

              I loosened the nut holding the wheel so it could spin freely and marked the low spot



              I then drilled and spun again. I still have more to take out but stopped to see what others had done.



              It did run a lot smoother but still has more vibration than I like. I did a test cut and I am happy with the results.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New Member

                Originally posted by H2oMaintMgr View Post
                I've been reading this thread with interest and have a question.
                Will someone explain to me how you balance the wheels on a band saw?
                Thanks in advance.
                Now there's a darn fine question! What I'm assuming is you "take the nut off" <<< which nut? and spin the wheel. Mark the position that comes to rest at the lowest point and spin again. If that same position keeps coming to rest at the bottom, it's the heaviest point. You then drill a hole, looks like Prater used a 1/4" bit, and keep spinning and drilling until it stops at random points.

                Did I get that even close to right?
                I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New Member

                  Pretty much, but it keeps stopping at the same point, it is really out of balance. I stopped drilling to try and get an opinion from someone who has done it before to see how much they had to remove. It really seems excessive at this point.

                  I just loosened the nut holding the wheel on the shaft so it could spin freely.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New Member

                    I have the BS 14002 and have made the mods that are recommended and its a fine saw if you know its limitations. Its never going to be a resaw monster with a 3/4 horse motor. Its a good saw if you dont push it too hard. It will resaw if you go slowly and have the correct blade. Mine runs smoothly after a link belt and balancing the wheels. I had bad tracking problems that were fixed with Urethane tires. I am happy with this saw. VASandy has the balancing procedure correct, but I want to add that I didnt drill completely through my wheels. I had to take lots of material off the wheel and didnt want to weaken them by drilling so many holes. I used a 1/2" drill bit and drilled maybe half way through.
                    Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                    Mark the position that comes to rest at the lowest point and spin again. If that same position keeps coming to rest at the bottom, it's the heaviest point. You then drill a hole, looks like Prater used a 1/4" bit, and keep spinning and drilling until it stops at random points.
                    You have to remember that the bandsaw is a somewhat finicky machine. For $350, the Ridgid 14002 will get you started. If you want a machine that runs smoothly right out of the box, it helps to spend around $600. If you do the simple mods yourself, you get a good saw for a reasonable price. Some people will argue that it should be perfect from the get-go, but this is a good example of "you get what you pay for" That being said, I am happy with my Ridgid and feel I got a good deal. HTH

                    Heres a picture of my upper wheel. You can see what I had to do to get it balanced. My bottom wheel wasnt as bad.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New Member

                      Originally posted by Prater View Post
                      I just loosened the nut holding the wheel on the shaft so it could spin freely.
                      It shouldnt matter if the nut is tight or not. The nut doesnt touch any part of the wheel or the outside of the bearing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: New Member

                        Originally posted by weblance View Post
                        It shouldnt matter if the nut is tight or not. The nut doesnt touch any part of the wheel or the outside of the bearing.

                        The nut was tight enough to put a lot of friction on the bearing. The wheel would not spin freely without loosening that nut. Thanks for the pic, I actually stopped drilling all the way through. There are three other holes that are just partial. I dont feel mine is as excessive after seeing yours.
                        Last edited by Prater; 04-16-2008, 08:16 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: New Member

                          Thanks for the hints, Weblance. I have to agree that for the $$$ the BS1400 is a decent piece of equipment.

                          I haven't had the trouble with the nut holding the wheel so tight in my saw. I'll double-check that today though. Definitely something to be aware of.
                          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: New Member

                            Couldn't small weights simply be added to the light portion(s) of the wheel?

                            Double sided tape would hold them/it on initially, and then epoxied in place.

                            ---Mike

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: New Member

                              Good point! Actually, how about some of those super-strong magnets? I worry about rotational forces actually making them fly off, but with the really strong magnets, they might not. And once you have them in the right places, you could epoxy them on. It'd be a waste of money, I suppose, if you have lead weights you could use. Kind of like balancing a wheel on your car, I suppose. Hmmmm....I wonder if car wheel weights would work???
                              I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                              Comment

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