Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

    I'm planning on making a large size round wall clock. It will be about 28 to 30 inch OD. The face will probably be made from hardboard, painted to look old. The movement will be a battery operated quartz movement. There will not be a pendulum or a case. I anticipate needing to back up or reinforce the hardboard face.

    I would like to finish the circumference with a circular wood molding. I figure I can make this circular wood molding by mitering about 12 pieces of wood and then trimming the inside and outside edges with my router fastened to a trammel. The ring would be 1 to 1-1/2 inches from inside to outside. The edges (inside & outside) of this wood molding will probably be softened with a round over bit. The wood would most likely be 3/4 thick.

    My problem is figuring out a way to bevel the face of this ring. The beveled or tapered surface could taper either to the inside or the outside of the ring. I've got a table saw, miter saw, jig saw, sanders, router & router table, plus an assortment of hand saws, chisels, and some hand planes.

    Any ideas on how to bevel the face of this ring?
    Last edited by Dick L; 04-26-2008, 07:52 PM.
    Dick

  • #2
    Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

    I may not understand the question. If you are rounding the edges, why the need for the bevel/taper? Are you wanting the face of the ring slanting in or out? Will the ring be 12 sided when finished or will it be round? If 12-sided, I would bevel it opposite on each edge, with the low side of the bevel next to the face on the inside and on the perimeter on the outside. You could bevel opposite to give a shadow-box effect, but it would also be a dust trap on the face side.
    As to "How", I would bevel on the TS on the strips before cutting them for the 12-sided glue-up. After glue-up, use the router/trammel on the back side to cut the rabbet for the face.

    Go
    Last edited by Gofor; 04-26-2008, 08:33 PM.
    Practicing at practical wood working

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

      Gofor, I guess I wasn't clear in my original description. The ring will be circular on both the ID and OD. It is the face of this round ring that I want to have beveled.

      Makes the problem a bit more difficult.
      Dick

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

        Can you use a chamfer bit on your router?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

          Will the bevel be across the entire 1-1/2" face width, or just a portion of it?

          Will the bevel be to the inside or outside? Beveled inward sounds more pleasing to me.

          How much bevel? If the material is 3/4" thick, will the bevel be 1/4 or 1/2" or some other value?

          If you were to taper from the full 3/4 thickness to say 1/4", you could take off the majority of the waste from each segment before you assemble the ring. This would be easier than working the completed circle as you could hack off the waste on the TS or BS.

          How will this be finished? Is plywood out of the question? Sounds easier than making up the 12 segment circle.
          Last edited by Bob D.; 04-27-2008, 09:27 PM.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

            Hewood - I have thought about using a bevel bit in the router table. One of these might work for making it thin on the OD and thick on the ID. However, I don't see how to keep the workpiece aligned to the router bit while moving the workpiece. I think it would be all too easy to slide the workpiece horizontally rather that rotating it about its center. The only approach I can see to keeping it positioned is to install some pins into the fence, either side of the router bit, to try to keep the workpiece centered and keep from moving it horizontally. I'm just not comfortable that this would work, and I'm also concerned my fingers might creep in too close to the bit.

            I also considered a horizontal panel raising bit, but my router doesn't have enough hp and is only a single speed, so those bits aren't a workable route. And I would still have the problem of keeping the ring on a true radial alignment.

            Bob D. - I would prefer for the bevel to be across the full face, but having a short non-beveled section on the thick edge would be okay. I agree the bevel inward would be more pleasing, but I could live with either.

            I was thinking of having the bevel only 1/4 to 3/8's deep. If the bevel was to the outside, it could be deeper.

            I've also thought of taking off some of the waste before assembling the ring.

            I do plan on painting the ring, so maybe I should consider using plywood rather than assembling a 12 segment ring. Still the problem of beveling it remains.
            Dick

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

              You can make a flat scrap (ie plywood) base that is the same diameter as the outside of the ring. use double sided tape to attach ring to it (or short brads into the back side.)
              Also make a right angled stand to clamp to the saw table. Put screw through center of plywood back into vertical leg of stand for pivot point. Rotate piece through the cutter.
              What I am trying to describe is a jig to rotate the glued up ring past the beveled ts blade. If you make the vertical "stand" so that it will slide along the fence or along the miter slot, it would be easier to introduce the work to the blade. If you have a disc sander, you could use it with that also if the bevel is low outside/high inside. With the saw blade you can bevel either way, depending on which side of the blade you put it.

              I would round the inside and outside of the ring before making the bevel, and ease the edges of the bevel into the roundover with a sander. Otherwise, you may not have enough surface on the edge to register the roundover guide bearing after the taper (the roundover would also come before the rabbet for the face for the same reason.

              If you have clamps that ride in the miter t-slot, it would be a fairly easy jig to make but I would run a test piece first (which means cutting an extra round scrap piece the ring thickness while you have the router trammel set up for the outside rounding).

              As for which direction to run the bevel, either would look good in the right setting. Beveling high on the outside will give a more substantial looking ring. Beveling high in the inside would allow it to blend closer to the surroundings, and give the appearance of a thinner clock.

              JMO. Hope it made sense.

              Go
              Practicing at practical wood working

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

                Gofor, that description does make sense. I clearly understand what you're describing. I'm not too sure that beveling high on the outside would work with the table saw. The blade may be too wide to make a clean and flat cut that way.

                I'm starting to think this idea might work good on the router table. Rather than making the stand with a vertical leg, incline the leg to the desired slope of the bevel (say 15 deg.) and use a straight bit, perhaps a straight pattern bit.

                A practice ring is definitely a good idea.

                Thanks.
                Dick

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

                  Use the router table. Get a beveling bit that has a guide bearing to limit the horizontal movement. I have several with different angles.
                  Joe Spear

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

                    Dick, good catch!! I stand corrected. Beveling high on the outside would give a convex surface and probably a lousy finish. My apologies.

                    Go
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How Would You Bevel the Surface of a Ring

                      Originally posted by Joe Spear View Post
                      Use the router table. Get a beveling bit that has a guide bearing to limit the horizontal movement. I have several with different angles.
                      This is the answer. If you want to make a ring get a bit with a bearing, make a round circle that the bearing is to follow and Bobs your uncle. If you want a wider bevel think of using MDF. Go with several thinner layers (ie 1/4") building the bevel to whatever width you want.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X