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  • Ripping / Fence / Clearances

    I'll gladly take the 'this-is-the-dumbest question-ever-asked' Award, but for the life of me I'm trying to make sense of this:

    One can have the fence on either the left or right side of the blade. What's the advantage of one or the other?

    --------
    Few other quick questions:

    To which side of the blade should the cut piece (cut stock intended for use, if you will) be on when the cut is made? Near the fence between the desired cut and the blade, or near the open area on the table while it will be unbound and 'free'?

    Also, I've been reading and re-reading that essentially one does not want the teeth to extend more than 1/4" above the surface when cutting, and usually with no more than four to five teeth protruding above the stock.

    Yet curiously enough the instructions that ship with the WW-II say, in effect, to crank the blade - and to CRANK IT HIGH. This appears to be with respect to cross-cutting.

    Lastly, I have to rip some 1" pine down to 7/16". Any advice greatly appreciated while I still have 10 digits?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    There are no simple one line explanations to the questions you pose. May I suggest you check out Jim Tolpin's, Table Saw Magic(ISBN 1-55870-512-0) and/or Kelly Mehler's, The Table Saw Book(ISBN 1-56158-426-6). Both offer excellent info on table saw use, maintenance, jigs and just about anything else you've ever wanted to know about table saws.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've got Jim Tolpin's book that Badger Dave recommend. I'll second that recommendation....it's pretty good. It was one of four books I got through the Woodworker's Book club for ~ $20.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll gladly take the 'this-is-the-dumbest question-ever-asked' Award, but for the life of me I'm trying to make sense of this:
        ************************************************** ***************
        I gladly take this as a test in what I have assumed I have learned from these forums and magazines I read. I encourage anyone who knows better than I to correct any of my answers and grade me accordingly!


        ************************************************** ***************
        One can have the fence on either the left or right side of the blade. What's the advantage of one or the other?
        ************************************************** ***************
        For straight ripping I would say "what ever is most comfortable to you" though I think the accepted norm (that's not "Norm") would be to have the fence to the right of the blade. For beveled cuts it depends on if you have a right tilt or left tilt blade. You want the fence on the side away from the bevel so that the material between the blade and fence cannot get pinched between the two.


        ************************************************** ***************
        To which side of the blade should the cut piece (cut stock intended for use, if you will) be on when the cut is made? Near the fence between the desired cut and the blade, or near the open area on the table while it will be unbound and 'free'?
        ************************************************** ***************
        Between the blade and fence if safe and practical. That gives you the best chance of a consistent repeatable cut.


        ************************************************** ***************
        Also, I've been reading and re-reading that essentially one does not want the teeth to extend more than 1/4" above the surface when cutting, and usually with no more than four to five teeth protruding above the stock.
        ************************************************** ***************
        And the debate continues... I believe the safest as far as exposure is to just clear the material. But that alone can be misleading... If the blade is as low as possible to just clear the material then a majority of the actual cutting is taking place in the horizontal plane, straight back at you and I think a contributor to kickback. So I think a little higher is better when possible. That of course takes in to account how much room you have between the fence and blade for a pushblock (notice I didn't say fingers Andrew, Ty, Evan, Cameron and all you other contractors on Trading Spaces and While You Were Out). But I think at least have the carbide cutting edge clear the material if possible.

        Some say to give the blade the best chance of clearing the sawdust out you want the blade high enough that the bottom of the gullet is above the material, but if you notice that the cutting teeth are on the front of the blade headed down, the gullet should clear after leaving the material at the bottom. So, ?? I say Hmmmm, maybe not that big of an issue.


        ************************************************** ***************
        Yet curiously enough the instructions that ship with the WW-II say, in effect, to crank the blade - and to CRANK IT HIGH. This appears to be with respect to cross-cutting.
        ************************************************** ***************
        See above regarding cutting force.


        ************************************************** ***************
        Lastly, I have to rip some 1" pine down to 7/16". Any advice greatly appreciated while I still have 10 digits?
        ************************************************** ***************
        Feather boards to push against the fence before the blade and a pushblock that can be sacrificed. I use a 24" 2X4 with a lip at the back for a pusher and let the saw blade cut into the bottom of the pushblock and through the lip as it clears the blade. Here is where a minimal clearance above the material with the teeth is appropriate because the will be buried into the pushblock anyway.


        ************************************************** ***************
        Thanks!
        ************************************************** ***************
        Save the thanks till after all the experts chime in and grade me.

        And get the books!!!!!
        <a href=\"http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx\" target=\"_blank\">http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx</a>

        Comment


        • #5
          Everyone - many thanks for the input - even the ISBN Numbers!. The one book I have* I've read through and through but it doesn't seem to cover much of what I've asked. So to that end...I'll order the aforementioned material.

          Thanks again!


          * "Table Saw Techniques - Revised Edition", Roger W. Cliffe

          Comment


          • #6
            Our public library has alot of wwing books.....that's an option too.

            Comment


            • #7
              What is an ISBN #

              Comment


              • #8
                Inernational Standard Book Number, or something to that affect. Using this numebr you can find a book on Amazon, B&N, library catalogs, in the Library of Congress, etc. It's like (and preceeds in time) a barcode for books.

                Here's the straight dope on it;

                http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/index.asp

                (there's a web site for everything it seems

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Bob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lgldsr:
                    I'll gladly take the 'this-is-the-dumbest question-ever-asked' Award, but for the life of me I'm trying to make sense of this:

                    One can have the fence on either the left or right side of the blade. What's the advantage of one or the other?

                    --------
                    Few other quick questions:

                    To which side of the blade should the cut piece (cut stock intended for use, if you will) be on when the cut is made? Near the fence between the desired cut and the blade, or near the open area on the table while it will be unbound and 'free'?

                    Also, I've been reading and re-reading that essentially one does not want the teeth to extend more than 1/4" above the surface when cutting, and usually with no more than four to five teeth protruding above the stock.

                    Yet curiously enough the instructions that ship with the WW-II say, in effect, to crank the blade - and to CRANK IT HIGH. This appears to be with respect to cross-cutting.

                    Lastly, I have to rip some 1" pine down to 7/16". Any advice greatly appreciated while I still have 10 digits?

                    Thanks!
                    Having the fence on one side or the other prevents wood from binding between the blade and fence. Usually you want the littlest piece on the free side of the blade. Since it is the hardest to control.

                    Think about the cut and see which side is likely to trap a piece of wood between the fence and blade. Also if you putting an Bevel angle on the wood the corner if sharp enough can ride under the fence, so make sure the bevel is facing down when against the fence.

                    As for which side do you take the cut piece from. If you using board stock you want the jointed side against the fence and since it is jointed it will be the piece you use. However if you cutting sheet stock I always keep the factory edge against the fence and use the cut piece from the free side of the blade. Remember to add the kerf thickness in you calculations.

                    I always try to maintain blade height that allows the gullet, valley between teeth, to clear the board thus allowing waste to be freed. Blades run cooler I think.

                    Ripping pine to 7/16 I hope you mean ripping and not resawing. If your ripping make sure you use push sticks and finger boards to hold and guide the wood.

                    If your resawing I suggest a band saw. If not possible be very careful and keep you hand out of the orange area. Assuming you have a ridgid saw with an orange throat plate. In other words even though the woood may be wide enough to keep you hand high above the blade as it passes through make sure you hand isn't there. I have seen wood literally explode and if the hand had been directly above the blade it would have fallen into the blade. Again use a push stick and finger boards to keep the wood tight against the fence and down on the blade.

                    Biggest thing THINK before you turn the machine on.
                    Rev Ed

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      First, and foremost, align trunion (blade) and fence. No cut is accurate, or safe until this is done. Using feather boards and push sticks, it makes little difference in methods. Safety first is the key to keeping one's extremidies. Using hold downs to keep the stock from climbing out of the cut is escential, regardless of blade tilt or fence position, for accuracy.

                      When doing precission cuts with angles, one is always used scrap for a trial cut to make sure everything is set up correctly. Then, the end product stock can be cut, eliminating costly trials on expensive wood. Not to mention timely set backs.

                      All has given great advice. The woodworkersbookclub.com is #1 with me. Not every page yields knowledge, but the tid bits withing are priceless.
                      John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Very sorry for the late reply of 'Thanks!'...been extremely busy with this thing called "Work" that keeps interferring with my lifestyle

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