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Newbe, green and slightly warped

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  • Newbe, green and slightly warped

    Greetings all. Thought it was time to introduce myself. I joined this forum some time ago and have been lurking in the background checking out the forum and picking lot’s of neat tips and trick. I’ve just gotten into woodworking, not having done much since high school some 27 years ago. So far, all I’ve managed is a small end table that I made out of Red Oak. For not having done any woodworking for so long, I was very pleased with the way it turned out. I am what you might call a Ridgidholic. I started 6 months ago with a TS3650. It has performed exceptionally well right out of the box and was easy to assemble. Heck, I managed the assembly by myself. Only downside encountered was the size of the fasteners. Instructions stated the bolts were SAE when in fact they were metric or vice versa. Took one cracked knuckle to figure that one out. My next step was a Ridgid TP1300. Not much to setting that up other than I still haven’t been able to adjust out the snipe. From what I’ve read in the forums, it would appear that there will always be a small amount of snipe. That’s okay though, it’s easy to work around. I just make sure that the boards I’m planning are about 4 inches longer than what I actually need. I did install a Wixey thickness gauge, that sure helped in repeatability when planning boards. Next stop was an EB44241. And finally a JP0610. I actually had a little difficulty in assembling this. Not a very big opening in the motor support. This makes it somewhat difficult for those of us with larger forearms to reach in there to install the bolt that holds the table assy. to the base assy. I think Ridgid could do a little better in that aspect but hey, I got it and it’s working great. I’ve seen a few posts that indicate some have had difficulties or dissatisfaction with Ridgid products or support. Personally, I’ve been pleased with the Ridgid products I’ve obtained to date. Haven’t had to deal with their service department yet so I’ll have to reserve judgment in that regard. I don’t have a shop, I’m like quite a few others and work in my garage (thank God for the Herc-U-Lift). Perhaps someday I’ll have that coveted 40 x 60 shop with 200 amp service I’ve always wanted. That would be sweet. I have one question and I hope someone out there understands what it is I’m asking and is willing to share the knowledge. I seem to vaguely recall some discussion about a link belt that replaces the factory drive belt on the TS3650. I don’t seem to be able to find the posts where this was discussed. I was wondering if anyone could enlighten me and explain what the benefits are in using one vs. the factory belt? Also, where one find such a thing?
    Thanks all,

  • #2
    Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

    The link belt is a great replacement for the standard drive belts. Your machine uses a multi-groove pulley and a serpentine belt, the original belt is every bit as good as a link belt. To use a link belt on a 3650 you would need to change the pulleys

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    • #3
      Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

      That’s good to know. If there isn’t any appreciable advantages then why incur the expense of the new belt and pulleys. Appreciate the feedback, saves me a few buck. Have a couple more questions for anyone willing to answer. Is the TS-3650 capable of handling a full kerf 10 inch blade? And what is the general consensus as to which blades are better for both ripping and crosscutting? Right now, the majority of what I have planned will be in Red Oak. Like I said, I haven’t done much woodworking for some time and am thus learning all over. If I’m getting into something that has already been discussed in another thread, I apologize. Just point me in the right direction. Thanks.

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      • #4
        Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

        I've had the 3650 for a couple years now, and haven't had to modify it at all. The link belt discussion is relegated to the Ridgid Band Saw. The BS1400 does run better with a link belt.

        I have the jointer, too and love it. It's a great tool. I have a DeWalt planer, and I get snipe on the ends of boards with it too. I think it's just a function of planers. I've adjusted the tables so the ends are level with the main part, but it still wants to snipe the ends of the boards if they're over 3'.

        Welcome to the forums, Krich. Congratulations on your purchases. Post some pics of your end table if you get the chance.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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        • #5
          Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

          I am sure you will get as many opinions on blades as there are brands, but here is mine:

          I have had very good luck using the Freud LU84R011 full kerf 50 tooth combo blade for both ripping and crosscutting red and white oak. I also have used the 60 tooth Freud Avanti thin kerf and it does give a slightly smoother finish for edge glue-ups. The feed rate is about the same for both in 2"+ (8/4) thick lumber. The advantage of the full kerf is that it does not tend to warp out resawing very thick stock, has very healthy teeth to allow for resharpening, and is not a pain to get the splitter aligned. The thin kerf is less expensive, but gives a slightly smoother cut.

          I currently have a 60 tooth full kerf Delta on the saw that I bought on sale ($20) when Lowe's was clearing out their stock. (My others are in need of resharpening and my prized LU84R011 has 3 chipped teeth due to a staple I did not find). It provides a smooth cut, is very well balanced, and heavy teeth for resharpening, but is dulling more quickly than the Freuds.

          IMHO, the Freuds are good blades, but the less expensive ones won't stand much sharpening. If you have a good sharpening service available, than I would go with the industrial quality ones if you are doing a lot of oak, etc. (You probably won't find the industrial quality ones at the borg).

          Hope this helps

          Go
          Last edited by Gofor; 05-09-2008, 07:00 PM.
          Practicing at practical wood working

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          • #6
            Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

            I've seen several references to the "borg" What exactly is that? I get the impression that it's some kind of a woodworkers heaven. If they have a web link, sure would appreciate it is someone would send it to me. When ever I Google "borg" I get pages upon pages of Star Trek hits. As soon as I'm able to get the camera working again (doesn't work so good after being dunked in a stream), I'll see about posting some pic's of the end table. Just keep in mind that it's my first attempt and that it not anything spectacular. The thing I'm most proud of is that I managed to build the entire thing without any fasteners. It's put together with dados, biscuit joints and glue and has thus far been very sturdy. Also appreciate the info concerning blades. Has anyone used a Forest Woodworker II? I've seen some positive reviews about them as well as the Freud. One last thing (remember I'm just getting back into this and am full of questions) does the Ridgid Herc-U-Lift work on a JP0610 jointer? If not, does anyone know of a mobile base that will work? Working in my garage, it's kind of difficult moving that thing around. Thanks again.

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            • #7
              Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

              Krich, I have and use the WWII blade. It's a GREAT blade and will work very well in the 3650. I am not 100% certain the price is worth it, but you're certainly getting a very good blade for the money. I think the Freud blades come very close to WWII performance as far as cut quality, but I still think the WWII is slightly better (having used both). Although, for the extra money, you could buy a couple Bench Dog feather boards which might be a better use of the $$$.

              The "borg" is a generic term for Lowe's and Home Depot and the like. They're just referring to the big box stores. Took me a while to figure that one out, too.

              I understand that with some slight modifications the hercu-lift will work on the jointer. I think you'd need to modify the base of the jointer a bit. In order to make the lift bolt into the jointer, you'll need some mount points which would probably mean making some supports to mount in the base of the jointer.
              Last edited by VASandy; 05-10-2008, 05:06 AM. Reason: Finally figured out how to spell Krich!
              I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

                Borg = Big Orange Retail Giant (Home Depot)

                This was the original, but it transmorgrified into :

                Big Obnoxious Retail Giant (Lowe's, etc)

                Basically, any of the large chain home repair stores.

                Go
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #9
                  Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

                  BORG quote: "Assistance is futile."
                  Jack

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                  • #10
                    Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

                    Okay, now that I've spent hours searching Google for the "borg" and learning more than I ever wanted to know about star trek, I feel like an idiot. Guess I should have read the replies a little sooner. I appreciate everyone’s responses, picking a lot of good info. Went and bought a Freud LM72R010X saw blade today. Made a few test cross cuts, works great. I think I’ll get a little better performance if I use zero clearance inserts. Anybody know of a place with good quality ZCI's that will fit a TS3650 that are on sale? Oh, by the way, I got quite the chuckle in res057’s reply, “Assistance if futile”. First, fit right in with all the star trek pages I looked at trying to find a store named "borg" that deals in woodworking tools and equipment. Second, you must have visited Tooele UT's Home Depot where the term "assistance" is almost a four letter word.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Newbe, green and slightly warped

                      Leecraft makes some pre-made ZCI's you can purchase. Woodworkers supply also has some for sale.

                      Leecraft at Eagle America is here. Part # 400-1112, $24.95each.
                      Woodworkers supply ZCI's are here. Part #95-611, $23.99each.

                      There's other places to get them. I did a google search of Zero clearance insert Ridgid table saw. I have been making my own using the TS, the band saw and a router. You could use a jig saw in place of the band saw. If you don't have a router, you could CAREFULLY rasp the insert to the final shape without too much trouble. I use plywood and get pretty good results. I don't worry any more about the screw and the rear pin. I find that getting the height just right takes a bit of tape (I use blue painter's tape, but whatever's handy will work), and a bit of tape around the edges makes for a snug enough custom fit.

                      Keep in mind that a 10" blade won't go down far enough to let your new ZCI clear so you can put the blade kerf in it. If you have an 8" blade around, you can put that on and raise it up, with the saw running, just enough to make a shallow kerf in the bottom (without going all the way through). I use one of the blades from my dado set for this. Then swap out to your blade and put the new ZCI in and raise the blade up through. I find that putting a board over the ZCI will hold it in place enough for raising the blade through. I hold the board over the non-blade side and clamp it down. I've also used the fence with a scrap board clamped to it over the ZCI. As long as the blade doesn't touch the fence it's ok. Make sure you put a finger hole in your new ZCI...they're tricky to remove if you don't!

                      Whichever route you go, a ZCI is a good thing to have. I have a few now. Different sized dodo blades each require their own slot. I find I can flip the ZCI over and use it for both 1/4" and 1/2" dados. Basically, you can get two dado ZCI's out of one piece. The 3/4" dado is in a ZCI of it's own, though. It's a big slot and I didn't want to chance another cut in that piece.
                      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                      Comment

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