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  • TS 2424 horsepower

    Would someone please check my math? I'm a little rusty on these conversions. The TS 2424 motor is rated at 13 amps at 120V which would be 1560 watts. That would convert to about 2.1 horsepower. Did I do that right or not?

    TIA
    Wood Dog

  • #2
    Your math is good, but you aren't accounting for inefficiencies (bearing drag, heat, whatever) in the motor.

    I think Emerson lists that as a 1 1/2 horsepower motor, which seems reasonable to me.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Dave,

      Thanks for the response. I couldn't find that rating in any of the supplied manuals, etc. unless I overlooked which is entirely possible.

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      • #4
        Look on the motor's data plate. There is a space for the horsepower rating, it is almost always supplied. It has been so long since I've looked at mine, I simply don't remember.

        Dave

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        • #5
          The math is right: the definition of 1 BHP is 748 watts. However, there are a couple of other things to take into account.

          First, as the man says, is the efficiency of the motor, including its internal load (such as bearings) and generated load (the impedience of the windings increases as the motor heats up).

          Second, you are assuming a constant 120 volts. As a practical matter, with line losses for the wiring in the house, the cord on the saw, and maybe also an extension cord, as the saw loads up the voltage could drop.

          Third, BHP is only part of the story; is assumes that the motor keeps turning at its rated RPM. The ability of a motor to maintain or increase RPM under load is "torque."

          All of which is why it is better, if feasible, to run the 2424 on 220 than on 110.

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          • #6
            746... (how's that for being a nitpicking son um a gun?)

            If your voltage drops, the amperage will rise. Wattage is more or less a constant, probably more less than more in the real world but the tendency is there anyway. The problem with pulling more amperage is that heat builds up in otherwise properly sized wire, and then it all goes to heck in a handbasket (learned that last part from Dad, he's a EE).

            I'm not certain it is proper to categorize the 746 watts = 1 horsepower equation as BHP. The "B" stands for brake, which is a measuring method. However, most of my horsepower knowledge comes from automobiles, where things are a bit different.

            Dave

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            • #7
              Re BHP: you may be right. I just looked it up, and found one reference that said "HP" and one that said "BHP."

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              • #8
                Dave,

                You are right about the 1 1/2 hp. I found it listed in the manual last night. I had just overlooked it. Funny thing though, the motor plate has an HP stamp but no rating listed. The reason I was looking was because I have been blade shopping and I noticed recommendations using horsepower as a criteria. The particular one I was looking at distinquished between saws less than or greater than 3 hp. That would seen to be a "general" distiction also between most cabinet and contractor saws although I'm sure there are exceptions. This blade selection "tool" tended to direct you toward thin kerf blades if you were under 3 hp. I understand the reasoning but I'm not sure I would use that as the sole criteria. It's interesting to see how the different blade manufacturers market their blades. It's obviously very competitive and I'm sure many advancements have been made over the years. ON the other hand, all dogs bark but they all don't hunt. That's why forums like this are so good.

                BTW, thanks for the interesting discusion on hp.

                Wood Dog

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                • #9
                  Wood Dog -

                  I have been blade shopping as well (Dado & Ripping blades). The Freud website ( www.freudinc.com ) has a great selection tool to help you select the "best" blade for your application. As you mentioned, HP is one of the selection criteria based on <3HP or >3HP. Amazon.com has good prices on a wide variety of blades. Good luck in the hunt.

                  - Jamie

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                  • #10
                    Just a note a blade thickness. The loss of rigidity of a thin kerf blade over a standard thickness blade will most likely far out weigh any power benefit you may gain.

                    Jake

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the advice guys. I'll keep all of that in mind. I have not had much experiance with the thin kerf blades and wondered if there would be a trade off. So far I haven't run into a bog down problem but I try to keep everything aligned and use common sense about the stock I am cutting and the type of cut. A buddy of mine calls it "listening to the saw." I'm afraid if my saw talked to me it would tell me to take up another hobby.

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                      • #12
                        Is there a book that you can use to figure this out?
                        Andy B.

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                        • #13
                          Andy B,

                          I've seen a lot of information on saw blade anatomy and all the variables. Jamie mentioned the Freud website which does a good job of helping someone figure out the best choice for the application among the Freud blades. As far as which "brand" to buy, it's really hard to get an apples to apples objective comparison between all of them that will also fit your own setup. It would be nice to see a saw blade "shotout" on the same setups and same conditions. Even better if you could bring your own stock samples and try them out yourself. Maybe this has been done somewhere already but I haven't heard about it. As far as picking the right "type" blade for a particular application and making the case for dedicated blades, I think that has been pretty well documented and discussed here as well as many other forums.

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