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Gloss black "piano" finish

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  • #16
    Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

    Originally posted by oldslowchevy View Post
    bondo is fair but i perfer the stuff in the gold can from napa
    Would the red glazing putting work as well in this case, OSChevy? I was thinking that it is easier to spread and is a finer paste and would work. I don't know how it would hold to wood since it *is* supposed to be a skim coat over the 'bondo'. I think that my tube is by 3-M.
    Later,
    Chiz
    https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

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    • #17
      Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

      I wouldn't use the red putty filler if it was me. That putty is an air dry filler with no catalyst which doesn't work well. Back when I did autobody work for a living we used two types of filler. The first is for large areas and is a typical bondo type filler, I would use the Evercoat brand of products, they make some nice stuff. The second filler is for fine work and must be laid on very thin and is called a glazing putty. Again, Evercoat makes some quality stuff here, just make sure that both fillers are two part fillers.

      As for finish, if you use "bondo" on the whole thing and sand with 400-500 grit then you can take the whole thing to a body shop and have them prime it and paint it with automotive paint. Use a base coat and clear coat system, that way you can water sand with 2000 grit and polish it.

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      • #18
        Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

        It's good to have someone like you, AMWeaver. It's that way with a diverse group such as ours. People with prior knowledge keep us from making mistakes in ignorance.
        Later,
        Chiz
        https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

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        • #19
          Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

          Like Ironhat said, Thank you AMWeaver! That is exactly the kind of sharing of knowledge that makes this board so special.
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #20
            Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

            i for one would love to know how it is coming along?
            9/11/01, never forget.

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            • #21
              Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

              As for finish, if you use "bondo" on the whole thing and sand with 400-500 grit then you can take the whole thing to a body shop and have them prime it and paint it with automotive paint. Use a base coat and clear coat system, that way you can water sand with 2000 grit and polish it.
              There is no point in sanding that fine. 320 is more than fine enough, 220 would be ok for pre-prime sanding. Hi building primer would fill that just fine, plus it gets a better grip on the substrate.
              If you have the capability to spray, there is no reason to pay a bodyshop....even if you could afford it, or find one that would do it. This is really all about the hand work, not the spray anyway. There is no reason not to use Lacquer, it will look fine. It was done that way long before modern 2-part automotive paint. You can still "sand & polish" the Lacquer clear, though 2000 grit is too fine for that too. Paper that fine just "follows the bumps", you have to "cut the top off" of the final coat with something more like 1000-1200 grit. You can then step-up to finer paper if you want to. It will shorten the polishing time.

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              • #22
                Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                Sorry to chime in late here, but one thing I find missing in the advise. The trick to body work or wood work when prepping for a high gloss finish is to make sure the contour is smooth. A common ROS will not do this, especially on long flat narrow surfaces. (you will get divots or low/high spots) You want to sand with a flat backing such as a sanding block (going with the grain on wood) or a relatively long semi-flexible backing for curves. A piece of pine cut to about 1/8" thickness works well for this. Bondo or spot filler (and yes the 2 part is superior) will work, but you only need to go to 220 grit or maybe 320 before priming. (320 is overkill but if you are more comfortable, it will still give a good profile for the primer to bite into. 400 is the absolute max. With 1000 or 2000, you run the risk of the primer not having a surface profile to hold onto on the hard bondo). If you are polishing out the lacquer finish to get a "French Polish" type shine, then you want to go with the finer grits after you have built up several coats of lacquer. At this point, you can also finish using micromesh polishing compound (automotive product used on clear coats and lacquers). For narrow areas like a divider frame, I would recommend hand polishing rather than a ROS, as the ROS will polish down through the edges.

                Go
                Last edited by Gofor; 06-22-2008, 08:41 PM.
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #23
                  Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                  Sandy

                  The more I read here and think about this, the more I really think you would do well to find a good well run privately owned body shop that does restoration of antique cars. They can get a nice glass smooth polished "Hot Lacquer" type finish. They would have access to quality products and you won't have nasty fumes to deal with. Remember that some fumes will leave you a changed (not for the better either) person. I know this can run into good $$$ but the end results may well be worth it. Be sure to check over their work. I know a good place (darn good body shop) in my area, but it's kind of far from you.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                    I have to do this myself, not sub it out. The customer hasn't purchased the material yet, so I haven't started yet. I intend to get some poplar this week and start some experimenting. I have a sprayer for my compressor, so I'll probably put up a tent with some fans and get a respirator and give it a go. I'll get some good quality body putty. Thanks for all the help!!
                    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                      Your polester fillers and bondo will all require a great deal of time to sand out imperfections. time = $$
                      so Buy enough 2k primer for the job, or if you want to cut costs use lacqure primer, the primer will fill the pours.
                      The 2k primer will be about 4x the price of a lacqure primer, but is more durable, will not shrink or crack.
                      next depending on the amount of work you want either use a base coat/clear coat finish, or buy a high quality single stage paint (use hardner) then cut and buff.(Diamont single stage would be my choice, made by RM)
                      Stay away from Sherwood Williams products, they are bottom of the line in automotive refinishing

                      There is a reason body shops do not use a lacqure base paint anymore is because it does not do well with temperture changes, it will shrink,crack and show all your prep work regardless of how many times you buff

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                      • #26
                        Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                        I know this thread is old but since it's resurfaced I found this which may be of help to someone in the future.


                        http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_bas...and_Piano.html
                        From the original questioner:
                        Here is what I ended up doing to ebonize the wood. I bought poplar for the top and legs of the cabinet and then bought India Ink and continued coating with that until it was completely black. A high gloss varnish did the trick on top and worked great, and it matches the original finish on the piano very well.
                        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                        • #27
                          Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                          I'm able to get 'piano' type gloss and finish with almost any kind of finish material. I lay it on heavy and sand flat then do it again and again until I have a completely level surface. Then it gets sanded, first with 400 grit on the ros, then 1000 and 2000 wet or dry used wet, by hand, and then, four aught steel wool with paste wax, and rub and rub and rub. Rub until there's no waxy feel.

                          You just want to put your face down on it.!!!!!!

                          d

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                          • #28
                            Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                            I can't thank you enough for all of the hints and tips!! The customer decided to go with a commercial outfit, and got the finish he was looking for. It's fine, although I was looking forward to doing this project. The odd thing is, he still hasn't picked up the project from the commercial place. I don't know why, since I know it's completed. I guess I'll have to do my OWN project for this finish!!
                            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                              Thank you, this is good news for other visitors
                              How to incorportate a small llc company? | Articles of incorporation services | Why incorporate business online yourself

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                              • #30
                                Re: Gloss black "piano" finish

                                Wow, the timeing... I was actually thinking about doing a piano finish on a humidor I was thinking of building..

                                Thanks again.

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