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Those of you who have converted the TS3612 to 240v

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  • Those of you who have converted the TS3612 to 240v

    Did you buy/make yourself an extension cord or make a longer cord to run from the TS3612 switch to your outlet? Anyone care to share exactly the plug and outlet you used? The folks at HD sold me Pass & Seymour 20A 250VAC 2-Pole 3-Wire Heavy Duty Single Outlet and same brand 20A 250VAC 2-Pole 3-Wire Straight Blade Plug. Both have one vertical slot/blade, one horizontal slot/blade and one ground.
    Alan
    My Shop

  • #2
    Sounds like HD sold you the right stuff to me.

    Personally, with any 220v plugs, I prefer twist lock plugs. #1 reason is electricution. 220 can be deadly, especially to young ones. Even if you are confident there will NEVER be young ones in the shop, I still consider them a safety neccessity.
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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    • #3
      Alan J.

      I did the same thing that you are talking about. I already had a 30 amp, four wire receptacle in my shop that is used for my air compressor. Since the cord on the compressor is short and it sits atop the receiver tank, I installed the receptacle about six feet off of the floor. This also gives a good safety factor for kids, pets and water ingress. Since the receptacle is so high on the wall, I had to make an extension cord so that I did not have to put the saw right up against the wall. Since the service and the receptacle was four wire, 30 amp, that is what I used to build the extension cord (along with 4 conductor #10 AWG SO cable). You never know what other neat piece of gear you may want to plug into the 208/240 service in the future.

      Good luck with the conversion. It's very simple and makes all the difference when starting the saw.

      Txrex

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      • #4
        Since the saw only draws 6.5 amps in 220v, you can get away with a 12 ga, or even 14 ga. extension cable that you make yourself.

        As far as an extension cord, 110 is just as dangerous as 220, so if you would want a twist lock for 220, then you should also want one for 110 as well, IMO.(been hit by 277v in the past. makes 120 feel good. Glad I'm still around today.)Since I move my saw around the garage, I plan on making a 20' extension cord so I'll be able to plug it into any of the 220/240 outlets. -When I change the saw over. I already have a compressor that runs on 240 and also plan on a dust collector in the near future. I just went and bought a new panel yesterday, so I can't wait to get things set up the way I want.

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        • #5
          I had my electrician install a small three prong 220 on the wall, then he brought me a cord for it. I had him get me a 10' (there were only 6' cords available to me at the hardware stores) so I could get the saw farther from the wall.
          Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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          • #6
            As me being a Master Electrician, I can give some input on the 3612TS as I have one myself purchased it a month ago. Switching it over to 220 V is a lot easier on the motor,it will run cooler and start better and if your shop is limited on service it wont make your lights go dim Also it actually use less Power, not much but it does. That is why a lot of company’s use it. The best way to make a cord of any reasonable length is to go and buy some SO or SJ cord it is a rubber cord and you can put your own twist lock devices on it. You will have to install a twist lock receptacle in the wall and it comes as a single device. One thing you will have to make sure of that you are careful with the cord as it is not like a regular cord if you trip on it will pull out, a twist lock will not!That may Hurt.............
            Thanks
            GB Enterprises
            Doing it right the first time!!

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            • #7
              Correction to my bad typing
              RE:
              "and if your shop is limited on service it wont make your lights go dim"

              Should read
              "and if your shop is limited on service 110 V will make your lights dim"
              Thanks
              GB Enterprises
              Doing it right the first time!!

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