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  • TS3612...Power cord question

    Just wondering if a longer cord can be put on this machine. If so, what would be max safe length? Would a heavy guage, short extension cord work?

    I have all my garage outlets about 3' above the floor on every wall. However, I can only use the table saw if one end (usually right side) is close to the wall due to the length of the cord coming from the switch. I would prefer to use the saw in the middle of the workshop/garage, but the cord won't allow that.

    Thanks,
    Kevin

  • #2
    I rewired my 3612 for 220V and replaced the stock power cord with a 20ft 14G one. If you run at 110V then you'll need to go up to 12G. Mine works out fine without any heating or other issues.

    David

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    • #3
      I am running my saw at 110v and use a 50ft 12g cord. Sofar so good. I will go to 220v this summer and will stick with the 12g just in case.

      Rob

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      • #4
        I'm running the same type of a setup as Rob except my cord is only 25' long. I really don't need all that cord and will eventually re-cord down to a more managable lenght.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          I believe wire is rated by wattage as well as amps. Since the wattage of your saw is the same regardless of whether you are running 110V or 220V, the needed gage should be the same. A book I have recommends 14g up to 50 ft and 12g up to 100 ft. However, my new Bosch router's owners manual recommends 12g up to 50 ft (for 16 not 15 amps though). I would go with 50' of 12g.

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          • #6
            Normally motors are not rated in wattage, but in ampherage. As your voltage increases your amp. decreases OHMS LAW volts X amps = watts. Resistance in the wire causes a drop in voltage and an increase in amps which can produce heat. Yes the wattage rating for the motor would be the same no matter what voltage it is run on, but the lower the voltage the higher the amperage. 14 gage is OK for up to 25' on 220v 12gage for 110v
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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            • #7
              OK, I'll go with 12ga @ 25' (or less). Don't need too much length, just about 10' would be great actually.

              Thanks everyone for the help.

              Kevin

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              • #8
                Agree, I was just pointing out that wire is rated by amps and watts (I'm not going into the technical aspects). Basically, just because your motor draws less amps at 220V, do not use a smaller gage wire since the wattage is the same as it would be on 110V.

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                • #9
                  Rmacmec, I believe you are mistaken, at least in regard to power wire.

                  As an example, I am looking at the specification document for Romex brand THHN. The allowable ampacity varies by temperature only, as in:

                  Gauge 8: 40 amps@60 degrees C, 50@75C, 55@90C
                  (footnote, for general use IAW NEC 1999, 310-15)

                  Power wire does carry a maximum voltage rating, which has to do with the insulation. In the case of this THHN, the maximum voltage is 600V (which is pretty common).

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Rmacmec, you can use a smaller gauge wire when running the same machine at 220V versus running it at 110V. Amps are halved, and its these higher amps that we draw, that causes us in the USA to use this bloody thick cable, compared to the tiddly thin stuff that's used in Europe and even the UK(240V).

                    However, if anyone is concerned, then the cost difference is minimal, and I would go for the belt and braces approach and use 12G.

                    David

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                    • #11
                      Sorry about this, I was wrong. I have a book that said to check amps and wattage (I checked and it does say this for some reason). Now that I think about it, it makes very very little sense!

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                      • #12
                        They may say that for the case of appliances that don't list amperage, instead listing wattage. They should explain how to convert back to amps, though.

                        Dave

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                        • #13
                          They don't convert back. They list Romex gages by amps and watts. This is why I thought wire was listed by both... Doesn't make sense when you think about it though (Power dissipated into heat=R*I^2). Again, sorry for the misinformation

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                          • #14
                            Kevin,

                            I wired my 2424 for 220, and all I did was change the plug. I did put a receptacle in the floor next to the saw. Regaurdless, I would jump one wire size up (heavier/thicker) that came with the saw for any extension cord up to 25'. 2 sizes for up to 50'. Over that, and it is recommended to run 600v wire and install a recepticale, or direct wire from the panel for a temporary power supply outlet.

                            Leaving the cord out from day to day, and running over it with the car to park it in the garage at night will effect it's performance. Continuous coiling/uncoiling it with twists can break the strands also effecting performance.

                            The best thing to do is jump up one wire size, get the proper length to use in the middle of your garage and replace the stock power cord. When coiling the cord for storage, unplug it first, and coil it from the saw to the plug end, removing twist, and in large coils to preserve the strands of the cord. Lay it flat on top of the saw rather than hangin it on the fence rail. The weight of the cord itself hanging, can kink the strands and over time work harden the copper, making it brittle and causing the strands to break.
                            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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