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3612 bevel angle guage alignment

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  • 3612 bevel angle guage alignment

    Just bought a 3612 and put it together without a hitch. Everything was right on out of the box except for the bevel guage alignment indicator. The manual says to bend the needle and adjust the guage up or down. The problem is I can't get the thing to point to 45 degrees when it is set dead on 90 and vice versa. No matter how much bending and tweaking I do, I can't get the 45 and 90 to point to there respective marks when either is set correctly, if you know what I mean.
    Anyone else have this problem and have a solution for it?

    Thanx

    Dave

  • #2
    I had this same problem, I loosened the screws on the side that hold the guage, then slid it down till it matched up at both ends. I "tweaked" the needle alittle too.

    Rick

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    • #3
      It's such a coarse measure of angle, that although I got it close at both ends, I wouldn't trust it to give an accurate reading. You'll have to use an external known angle device against the blade, if you want to do really tight tolerance angled cuts.

      David

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Cutbuff:
        It's such a coarse measure of angle, that although I got it close at both ends, I wouldn't trust it to give an accurate reading. You'll have to use an external known angle device against the blade, if you want to do really tight tolerance angled cuts.

        David
        Yeah I kinda firgured as much, but it's just IRRITATING!

        [ 03-12-2003, 12:17 PM: Message edited by: dsfraser ]

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        • #5
          Adjusting screws are the key, as they are the way to change the radius of travel, which was the problem you were having----but as David said, it's just an indication for when you're bent over cranking the handle.
          Dave

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          • #6
            You should see the bevel gauge on a really high end tablesaw. For example:



            Here is the blade height, tilt, and blade speed adjuster from a Format-4 saw, built by Felder. Beauty, huh?

            Of course, there is a downside. The base model Format-4 costs approximately the same as 24 Ridgid TS3612s.

            Dave

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            • #7
              Here is what I use to check my bevel angle... It is magnetic and works very well... I think i paid $1.99 at a Harbor Freight retail store in Omaha, Ne... I check the table first for a "0" degree reassurance then raise the blade up and attach this gauge, crank the handle to the desired bevel an SHAMOO... Done and ready to go...

              http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=34214

              Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

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              • #8
                2 things on a saw that is there, that shouldn't be. The stick on tape for the fence, and the angle indicator. I never make a precission cuts without checking the angle with a reliable source, and set the fence with my cabinet makers rule by the blade. And always add 1/64 for a little blade wobble. Even the wobble free Freuds DO wobble a smidgin, but far less than others.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                • #9
                  First make sure you are getting a full 45º of travel. Without that you will pull your hair trying to get the angle correct.

                  First, do as the manual says, get the pointer lined up with the 0º mark. Try to get the pointer as close to the surface as you can. Bevel the saw to 45º. I will guess the pointer will be at the 43-44º mark. Loosen the upper screw and move the scale down to meet the pointer. If that doesn't catch it, loosen the lower screw and move that end of the indicator up. You should be able to reach the 45º marking at that point. Think of it this way, you are matching the arc of the scale to the arc the carriage travels.

                  Jake

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                  • #10
                    Despite the quality of the 3612, any measurement set by a bobbing piece of bent metal (the tilt angle gauge) won't be good enough for tight fitting joints, etc.

                    On the other hand, I disagree with Woody on the tape for the rip fence. I don't know how Ridgid got it so good, but I get better cuts using the tape than I do measuring to the tooth of the blade. I calibrate the tape by measuring an actual cut with my digital caliper, and adjust the magnifying line to match actual. The results are normally dead on. If I find a cut is off by a hundredth of an inch (1/4 of a mark on the tape), I usually find it was because I was sloppy setting the fence - operator error.

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                    • #11
                      Woody: I know this is a little off-topic, but 1/64" (15 mils) would be a lot of wobble, or runout. Runout is typically less than 3 mils.

                      That being said, if it works for you, carry on. It's these little techniques that people adopt with experience that makes this hobby so interesting.

                      [ 03-14-2003, 12:16 PM: Message edited by: Green Wood ]

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