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  • Painting wood

    I have to say before I start that I have very little experience with woodworking.

    I’m installing new vanity doors (which were made to order) and they need to be painted. I applied a coat of paint (starting with the back of the door – not done the front yet). After the first coat dried it seems like it was not thick enough as the color is not even. Also I can see brush marks.

    Any suggestions/tips on panting wood and getting a more uniform appearance. I thought I would ask for some advice before applying the second coat and doing the front which is of course the more important face.

  • #2
    Re: Painting wood

    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
    I have to say before I start that I have very little experience with woodworking.

    I’m installing new vanity doors (which were made to order) and they need to be painted. I applied a coat of paint (starting with the back of the door – not done the front yet). After the first coat dried it seems like it was not thick enough as the color is not even. Also I can see brush marks.

    Any suggestions/tips on panting wood and getting a more uniform appearance. I thought I would ask for some advice before applying the second coat and doing the front which is of course the more important face.
    I prime first; then do two or three coats of paint. To avoid brush marks I use the disposablefoam brushes (also great because you don't need to clean them) or the small rollers.

    I'm relatively new to this, so am curious to what other suggestions you get.

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    • #3
      Re: Painting wood

      Lightly sand between coats for a smoother finish and wipe off any residues left behind from the sanding....
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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      • #4
        Re: Painting wood

        I can't think of anything I hate to do more than painting! Because of that I try and get it right the first time. What works best for me is to first use a good quality primer followed by a couple of light coats of top quality paint. Don't buy cheap paint, it will bite you in the backside every time.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: Painting wood

          With the primer, I'm careful to sand the last time with the grain, then I prime with my strokes also following the grain. Sand between each of 2 coats of a good quality primer. If I'm going with a color, I'll try and get my primer tinted to close to the finish color (just makes it easier to cover with the final coat). The primer just needs to be close in color without actually being the same color. You want to know how well you're covering the primer with your first top coat.
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #6
            Re: Painting wood

            For doors I always use two applicators: a small brush and a mini roller.
            Cut in all the mouldings and inside corners with the brush, then finish off the face frames and raised panels with the mini roller. This achieves nearly a sprayed-on appearance.

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            • #7
              Re: Painting wood

              Wow that was fast - thanks for the replies. I assume sanding is done by hand and fine grit (150 - 220)?

              I guess I will pck up some foam brushes and a small roller.

              I also need to paint the existing vanity which has already been painted a different color. Is it okay to simply wash the surface down and paint over or should the old paint be sanded off.

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              • #8
                Re: Painting wood

                Min. 220 grit, I'll go to 400 on last in between coats.

                If your paint isn't peeling, wash down and get er clean, light sanding for a good bonding situation 220 grit should do.

                For cleaning I use TSP Tri Sodium Phosphate, you can get that just about anywhere, even at a True Value store...
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Painting wood

                  You didn't mention what kind of wood you were painting and sometimes that can make a big difference.

                  I work with a lot of pine, figuring that if it's going to be painted there's not much sense in covering better grades like oak or maple. I also prefer to use a latex paint as the oil-based stuff gives me terrific headaches. (A mask helps, but not all the time.)

                  With pine, there's most always knots. So, I usually sand first, wipe the wood with a damp sponge to raise the grain and once dry, I sand a final with about 220 grit.

                  Knots will most always bleed through to some extent, and I've found that primer doesn't always seal these very well. I read once that shellac is great for sealing knots and I've liked the results. I then prime one coat and follow with two coats of my finish paint, sanding lightly before the final coat.

                  If I'm dealing with flat pieces, I prefer to use a roller, of a size that best fits the area painted. On pieces with trim, I'll use a brush of course, but I hate brush marks and the "extra" amounts of paint that you end up with in corners, crevices, etc. (especially with latex). If I'm set up, I really prefer to use my "spotting gun" and spray it on. Of course if you're talking about multiple colors, you sort of have to stick to a brush.

                  CWS

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                  • #10
                    Re: Painting wood

                    I believe it is pine as I recall - that's what the cabinet maker who made the two doors and the false drawer told me.

                    This is another related general question on painting - I don't do much painting unless I really have to (don't really like the task ). However, I have never really been able to get brushes and rollers really clean - they always seem to end up stiff and with tiny bits of paint stuck in the bristles of the brushes. For this reason if I'm painting a large area - say some walls - I buy and use a rollers/brushes and then throw them away rather than the messy task of cleaning it up.

                    I also have an HVLP gun somewhere in my tool collection which I used once - what a pain to clean up all the parts.

                    What do you guys to to clean up tools/brushes/rollers after use.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Painting wood

                      I never bother cleaning rollers. I store it in a tight ziploc bag between coats, so I can used one roller for a given color/job... but then I toss it after the painting is done. Too much of a pain IMO to clean them thoroughly for another job. It's not 'hard', per se... but usually involves spinning them, which makes a mess from splatter.

                      Brushes, however, are a different story. Buy a *good* quality brush for the paint type your using. As soon as you're done with a coat and going to be waiting, soak it for a few minutes in *warm*, very slightly soapy water. Then just rinse the brush out and vigorously work the bristles against your palm and fingers to release the paint "in" the brush. Also rinse it down-the-middle by putting the bristles upward and letting water run down into the heart of the brush. Shake it out, wipe it down vigorously with a clean rag or shop towel, and then put it back in its original packaging to dry. The package keeps the bristles straight while it dries.

                      Now, with regards to painting your cabinet doors... have you considered using ultra-fine foam rollers? They put on a very nice, even, slightly stippled textures that is similar to factory made "colored" cabinet finishes. It's not smooth, but it's not rough or stippled like wall paint usually is.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Painting wood

                        Well, I really don't like to buy "expensive" brushes. Probably most of my brush purchases are in the low to mid- price range. I don't mind cleaning, but it does take more time than I wish. Eventually you end up with too much paint in the root of the brush and after a while you just have to toss them. Still, I manage to get a several projects out of my brushes, even if stored a few months between projects.

                        Latex brushes get rinced with warm water until water is clear and the bristles are clear of any paint particles. The root of the brush is always a problem and I just do the best I can there. When the build-up is really obvious, I let the brushes soak in brush cleaner.

                        For the few times I have used oil-based paint, they always get left hanging in a jar of mineral spirits, then get wiped clean and then dipped into a fresh bottle of mineral spirits before final wiping.

                        Whether latex or oil-based, I've found the brush will last a lot longer and be ready for the next project if I use compressed air to blow out the bristles on the final rinse. I then wrap the brush in order to keep the bristles straight and in good condition.

                        Rollers are another problem. I've only used a roller with latex paint, so a very good rinse, squeezing out the paint as I rinse, works pretty good for me. If I've spent a lot of time painting a big room, I cover the roller and pan with a wet cloth when I take a break. Final cleaning usually take several minutes as the roller is usually saturated by the end of a full day. In such cases, I usually remove the roller from holder and clean the holder separately while the roller itself, is rinsing. (Stand the roller on end and let water fill up the tupe and then cascade down the sides.)

                        Unless it's a cheap roller, I clean it by rinsing it in warm water, squeezing it out as I rotate it. When the water appears to run clear, I'll slip it partially back on the holder and then stick it into a bucket of water (roller completely submerged). A few hours later, you'll find that gravity has pulled any remaining paint to the bottom and/or out of the roller. I then squeeze out the excess water and then blow the rest out with compressed air.

                        CWS

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                        • #13
                          Re: Painting wood

                          Great - thanks for all that useful info.

                          As for the rollers - I picked up some foam ones as well as the regular rollers. The regular rollers are giving a slightly textured look which I think looks quite nice. I was also able to get the roller into the edges so they all look textured.

                          Not tried the foam roller yet.
                          Last edited by blue_can; 07-23-2008, 03:55 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Painting wood

                            Tried the foam rollers today - great finish. That's the thing to use for this application. A big difference from using a brush.

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