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  • Working with Rough Stock

    I want to make a high chair for my daughter, and when I saw the price for nice S4S hardwoods; I started to think about making it out of rough stock so that I could save some $$$ on the wood. Generally, I kind of like collecting tools as much as doing the projects; but my tool budget is a bit tapped out and I would really like to do this particular project. And if I spend money on tools, I definitely have no money for wood; not a very fun combination.

    Anyway, I have no jointer or thickness planer, but I do have a TS (3650) and a 1hp fixed base router. My thought is to build a sled like this one for the edge jointing:
    http://www.newwoodworker.com/tsjointjig.html

    Since I don't have a router table, I did also think of just using a flush trim bit against something straight; but I think the TS sled would be easier and not go through cutting tools as fast.

    And for face jointing, my thought was to build a jig for the router. Maybe something like this:
    http://www.leestyron.com/sled.php

    Has anyone else done it this way? This seems like the only way to do it; but I would imagine that it burns through bits pretty quickly; but it has the advantage of not needing another tool. I thought about hand planes, but getting a good new hand jointer is almost as much as the power tool; and I'm not very keen on used tools (I know that a lot of people are; but searching Craigslist/eBay is not my cup of tea).

    I just sort of want to hear thoughts on what you did before you had a jointer/planer; and am not really set on the methods.

  • #2
    Re: Working with Rough Stock

    Where have you looked for hard woods, There is Dykes down the street from your office that should have a decent selection and there is also Condon's lumber in White Plains there prices seem to be the best around!

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    • #3
      Re: Working with Rough Stock

      Originally posted by wrench spinner View Post
      Where have you looked for hard woods, There is Dykes down the street from your office that should have a decent selection and there is also Condon's lumber in White Plains there prices seem to be the best around!
      Dykes only has the dressed wood at around $10/lf for what I need. I'm planning on making a trip to Condon's, which I'm told has a good selection of rough stock. From what I've read elsewhere, it seems that it is pretty typical for the dressed stock to be twice as much as rough stock.

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      • #4
        Re: Working with Rough Stock

        I have a couple thousand feet of rough sawn black walnut if you are interested?!? (not all of it just what you need)

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        • #5
          Re: Working with Rough Stock

          Darn, I figured this was an equine training thread.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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          • #6
            Re: Working with Rough Stock

            sorry to disappoint you Mark!

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            • #7
              Re: Working with Rough Stock

              Not highjacking your thread,

              Mark, if you want a try at some "Rough Stock" I got a 2-1/2 year old Thouroughbred that has never been ridden. To my knowledge, no one has ever tried except me (being the genius that I am, at least according to my brother), that one ride lasted all of about 15 seconds this past Saturday. And no, I did not get thrown, I bailed before he and I both went through the fence and/or stable doors.

              On the wood issue, working with rough cut materials will be difficult without a planer and jointer to say the least. I am not saying it can't be done, it's just going to be difficult.

              Let us know what you decide and how it turns out.

              Regards,

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Working with Rough Stock

                For my first projects I took a night school wood working course at the local high school, make what ever you want and learn the proper way to use power tools. Valuable learning experience and was able to use better tools than I have in my shop today

                This is what I made... got to use the 8"jointer, 24"planer, stroke sander for the top and 5HP shaper for the raised panels

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                • #9
                  Re: Working with Rough Stock

                  Check out Niki's stuff in tips and techniques. He has some pretty inovative ways of doing just about everything. Sticky has put a post at the top of the section with all of his stuff in it and he has a couple things on jointing that you should read

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                  • #10
                    Re: Working with Rough Stock

                    I understand your concern about spending big bucks for a planer - the whole point of your post is thinking about ways to save money. I guess the only encouragement I might give you is to reconsider the thought of purchasing an older high-quality hand plane and take a bit of time to learn how to tune and use it. I guess I say that because not only is this an inexpensive way of going, but it is also a way to build your skills that will last for a lifetime. It's easier than you might think to learn how to do some basic rough dimensioning with a hand plane. This video, www.woodtreks.com/how-to-use-a-hand-plane/21/ video shows you the basics to get you started. I hope this helps. Keith (www.woodtreks.com)

                    BTW, the plane in this video cost me $25 and took only an hour or two of tune-up.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Working with Rough Stock

                      IMO a jointer will not substitute for planer,

                      if your do not have access to a thickness planer I strongly suggest a min of 2S lumber,

                      yes in a emergency or some thing special the router sled, or similar will work but it slow, and very time consuming,

                      a hand plane will work as you know it was used for years before power tools became prominent, but even they are a talent and the thickness will not be a exact as your probly desired, a lot may depend on the choice of wood as well,

                      a lot would depend on the size of pieces you need, on a high chair your dealing with smaller pieces normally,

                      and for you information I think if you can find a good older used piece of quality wood working equipment is probly a better bang for your buck than new any day of the week,

                      I have a 60 year old table saw, and you could give me three new contractors saws of anybody's make and I would not trade it. the quality and the solidness and the solidness's is jsut unbeatable, If you can find a old Delta jointer, and it is complete and in working conditions I really do not think you will find a better tool, a old belsaw or parks planer will IMO knock the socks off the new portable planers out there, yes there only 12+ inches wide, jsut like the portable but there quality made to last for years and years, I would love to find another belsaw planer, and jsut keep it for molding cutters, or I would really like to find a good 24" or wider unit some time, and then use my current belsaw for a monling machine, but if and when that comes great.
                      good used equipment can be a very good buy. no buying used low quality tools probly is not the best use for your moneys,
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
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                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Working with Rough Stock

                        Originally posted by Keith Cruickshank View Post
                        I understand your concern about spending big bucks for a planer - the whole point of your post is thinking about ways to save money. I guess the only encouragement I might give you is to reconsider the thought of purchasing an older high-quality hand plane and take a bit of time to learn how to tune and use it. I guess I say that because not only is this an inexpensive way of going, but it is also a way to build your skills that will last for a lifetime. It's easier than you might think to learn how to do some basic rough dimensioning with a hand plane. This video, www.woodtreks.com/how-to-use-a-hand-plane/21/ video shows you the basics to get you started. I hope this helps. Keith (www.woodtreks.com)

                        BTW, the plane in this video cost me $25 and took only an hour or two of tune-up.

                        Welcome to the site Keith, well done website

                        Hand planes are great tools but there are some hidden expenses. If you are not setup to sharpen them a kit will set you back a bit but the biggest investment will be the time it takes to learn the skill of sharpening. It is kind of like a mastercard commercial ....

                        Cost of Stanly type 8 jack plane $25
                        Cost of sharpening supplies $100
                        learning to use and sharpen hand tools - PRICELESS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Working with Rough Stock

                          The jig you are talking about will do the job, but so will one that is not so involved. My sled is a 1x8x8'. I drilled holes down one edge about 2" apart and made some clamps out of scrap wood that bolt in the holes. Clamp your wood to the board and set your table saw to cut the first straight edge. Then take the board off the jig and reset your saw to square the other edge. Now all you have to do is plan the way to make the 2 faces square to eachother.

                          I would find a fellow woodworker in your area that has a planner.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Working with Rough Stock

                            "Cost of sharpening supplies $100"

                            Use the scary sharp method and you can do an excellent job sharpening your irons and chisels for cheap.

                            I agree with BHD, find some quality older vintage tools and you will have some excellent machines for less than the price of the new import junk. Manuals and parts such as blades for many are still available.

                            If I could only have one between a planer and jointer I would opt for the planer. I can joint using the router or the TS and I can get the first face flat using a sled on the planer to support twisted boards if need be. Many would choose the jointer. Its all preference I guess.
                            ---------------
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