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  • Squaring MS1065LZA

    Hi,

    I'm a total newbie at this. I'm having trouble squaring my MS1065LZA.

    I have assembled it, disassembled it and reassembled it several times. I have adjusted the laser. I am wondering if I made a mistake by following the manual and cutting a cut in the zero clearance throat plate before I attempted to square the MS1065LZA.

    The problem is when I lower the blade, the laser tracks considerably from the right to the left. This would indicate that the blade is not square to the table.

    How do I fix this? Can I fix this? Should I take it to an authorized service center to have this fixed?

    Thank you in advance for all your assistance.

    Paul

  • #2
    Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

    Welcome to the forum Paul.

    I would not use the laser as a method to determine if the blade is square or not. The disk lasers are meant to be a guide not an exact locater of the cut, it will shine in the same spot at the same height all the time but since it is projected from the side of the blade it will never be able to project a beam under the blade (the blade blocks the light path). Set the machine up with a reliable square (preferably a machinists square) and use the laser as a general guide as to where the blade will cut

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    • #3
      Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

      Those arbor mounted lasers are a crock... The best they can usually get is within 1/8" of where you'll cut.. only on one side, and as you've noticed it moves as the blade gets closer to the workpiece.

      If you want a laser that accurately shows you where a cut is going to actually occur, check out this: www.laserkerf.com

      I am not affiliated with them, but I put one on my Bosch SCMS and love it. It shows the precise location the cut will be, AND is the width of the blade kerf, so it works from either right or left. You can get a battery operated version or a plug-in version. I opted for the plug in, but regret it now as I often will skip it if I'm in a hurry and go back to the old eye-ball method..

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      • #4
        Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

        Hi,

        Thanks for the welcome and your response.

        How do I set the blade up with the machinist square? I want to ensure that the blade is perpendicular to the table.

        Do I use the knob on the back of the saw? Does this knob just loosen and tighten the vertical or does it do something else.

        Is the a way to check whether I have everything set up properly?

        Thank you again for your assistance.

        Paul

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        • #5
          Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

          If you bought it within 90 days, then I'd return it and get another one. I went to buy a Ridgid mitre a couple of weeks ago but the store was out. Picked up a Ryobi slider instead and it couldn't cut straight right out of the box.

          Took it back and got another brand slider on sale that week elsewhere. Cut square right out of the box.

          As far as the laser, I don't even use it. Have heard the 1/8th outage from countless other people. Of course, for rough carpentry, what the hey........
          I'm on "The List" and I love it!!

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          • #6
            Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

            Hi,

            Thank you for the information about the arbor mounted lasers. I was a little concerned when it started tracking from right to left as I brought the blade down. I thought this was indicating that my blade was not square to the table. As you indicate, the laser can't point underneath the blade because the blade is in the way.

            Thank you also for the information on the Laserkerf and the website. I will have to consider this an option in the future. Right now, I'm just trying to get it set up square, so when I make mitre (sorry for the spelling, but I'm in the Great White North!) cuts on the molding, the pieces at least fit together.

            Thank you again for your assistance.

            Paul

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Squaring MS1065LZA

              Check for square in two directions (bevel and miter). Put the base of the square on the table and slide it against the blade to make sure the bevel is at true 0°. With a larger square lay it flat on the table against the back stop, pick one tooth on the blade, that tooth should just brush against the square as you pull the head out to full cut width. If the tooth starts to drift away from the square or dig into it you need to adjust for 0° miter.
              Make sure your carpenters square is really square. Clamp a straight board to some plywood. Lay the short end of the square against the wood and draw a line on the plywood along the long edge of the square, now flip the square over so the long edge remains on the line you drew and the short edge rests on the clamped straight piece of wood. Look at the long edge of the square in reference to the line you drew. If the long edge lay perfectly along the line you drew the the square is square. If there is a gap at the wood straight edge but touches the line at the top then your square is more than 90°, take a center punch and hammer a dimple in the outside corner of the square. If the gap is opposite then the square is less than 90° and you need to hammer a dimple on the inside corner of the square (spreads the arms of the square). Repeat entire process after each adjustment.

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