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PRESS RELEASE - RIDGID® INTRODUCES THE ULTIMATE TABLE SAW

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  • #16
    Any guesses about where the extra 45 pounds of weight might come from (3612 to 3650). Redesigned cabinet, thicker cast iron top???

    [ 08-06-2003, 11:17 AM: Message edited by: Curly Qsawn ]

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    • #17
      The extra weight comes mainly from the two extensions. They are now solid cast iron except that there is a small cut-away section close to the blade on each extension. This cut-away section gives a place to clamp on feather boards or other fixtures. Thanks!

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      • #18
        Cool, there's another frequently asked for feature.

        Dave

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        • #19
          Will the throat plate be the same size as current ridgid tablesaws?
          Andy B.

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          • #20
            I'm not sure if this answers your question or not but the blade insert on the new saw is "about" the same size as on the current saw. However, they are not interchangeable.

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            • #21
              The saw sounds pretty good, but the ExactICut- Indicator isn't new. My 15 year old Sears had that. It's basically a plastic disk (that inserts into a hole in the table) that you can use a pencil and mark both sides of the saw's blade on it. You then are suppose to know exactly where the cut will be.

              If Sears and Emerson had a falling out, I wonder how they are using it? Or maybe, the patent, if it had one has expired.

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              • #22
                Sounds really great - but is still missing the feature I want most: a blade brake.

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                • #23
                  Curt: Could you please tell me why you would want a blade brake. Most people think that a belt drive saw stops quickly enough. However, there's lots of opinions. I would be very interested in your answer. Thanks!

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                  • #24
                    Bob, I have to agree with Curt. A blade brake is a valuable safety and convenience item.
                    Some procedures require that the blade be stopped before the stock is removed such as a blind cut (Blind dado), cutting louvers, or a stopped cut, such as stopping at an inside corner. I have seen kickbacks or damage to stock if bumped into a yet spinning blade. And when it becomes necessary to turn off the saw before the cut is complete, such as stock binding, it is a safety issue. (Occasionally I cut a piece of wood that will not support itself on the table behind the blade, and the piece must be held until the blade stops. An outfield table, if available, is one solution to that one.)
                    I just checked the stop time on my TS2424-1 which took over 13 seconds. So I’m not sure I know whom the “most” in “Most people think that a belt drive saw stops quickly enough” are. To prove it to yourself, go cut a couple feather boards.
                    If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by bdueker:
                      Curt: Could you please tell me why you would want a blade brake. Most people think that a belt drive saw stops quickly enough. However, there's lots of opinions. I would be very interested in your answer. Thanks!
                      It's a safety and convenience thing. Safety because my outfeed table is a Rigid flip top and I often cut large panels that require me to hang on to them while the blade spins down. The Freud blade I'm using makes no noise while it is spinning and it's easy to forget that it is. Ruined a cut-off that way - just happy that it wasn't my arm. So this beautifully balanced setup spins better than a TLD20 with a Tiburon frame and I stand there dripping sweat on the table and on the piece wishing it had a brake.

                      Obviously, I'm not using the supplied blade guard. Why? you ask. I find that the blade guard hangs up more often than not and leaves me hanging on to the stock with one hand and using the other to free the guard. I don't like off balance operations when my fingers are within an inch of the blade. I consider that having to fuss with the blade guard with a running saw is more dangerous than not having the guard.

                      The exact same problem set occurred with my Delta RAS and so the lower blade guard assembly is history (it has an effective brake). My Makita (also has a brake) miter saw had it's blade guard bent when a long 4 x 4 fell off the support and caught the guard. It, too, is history.

                      Don't know what one costs, but I'd pay $50 retail extra to get one. If you can rig one as an optional accessory, I'd really love you guys.

                      Sorry about the longwinded response and thanks for listening.

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                      • #26
                        Bob, thanks for asking for input on this one. I think we all appreciate it because it is nice to see Ridgid listening (great job on the specs for the TS3650 by the way).

                        I agree that a brake would be a huge plus for me. If there was a way to rig it as an accessory, it may be a good way to market it without increasing the base price of the table saw. I would buy one for my 3612 (hint, hint [img]smile.gif[/img] ) Come to think of it, I may just rig one off the belt drive with a soleniod some day (power keeps the soleniod disengaged, turn off the power the soleniod engages on the belt).

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                        • #27
                          I would consider a buying a blade brake as an option for my 3612. I was cutting slats the other week, over 100 cuts, it takes over 10 seconds for the blade to stop. Waiting for it to stop over 100 times is a big waste of time and irritating. 1000 seconds is about 17 minutes.
                          www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                          • #28
                            Sure would make fence distance changes a whole lot quicker. Even my 1969 RAS has one (although it is a manually operated one.
                            Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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                            • #29
                              Thanks everyone for the comments on blade brakes. I can't promise anything except that it sure opened up a lot of eyes here. Thanks!

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                              • #30
                                All the advances sound interesting. Am sorry to see the castings changing---as to insert plate----I have an older model and loved that I could get many new/improved parts to fit my old saw!

                                While I can see advantages to a blade brake, most I've seen have been on direct drive motors----

                                But, if you're looking for improvements or aftermarket accessories----how about at least having an accessory riving knife or drop-in splitter. There are many aftermarket overhead blade guards that can be used on the Ridgid, but no one yet has a splitter (which is needed with the overhead guard) for the Ridgid----it certainly is a popular aftermarket improvement.
                                Dave

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