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  • Blade Size

    I am just starting to equip my garage with woodworking tools so partly out of necessity, and partly by accident I changed the stock Ridgid 10" 40T blade for a 7 1/4" 40T Freud fine finish blade with thin kerf. I'm cutting mostly stock that is thin enough for the blade and I am pleased with results.

    The smaller blade cost me 1/4 of the 10" one. Looking at a few grand to spend before I have most tools I need the price is a factor to me.

    I don't have much experience in the intricate parts of the woodworking art so I'm not sure if this is OK and what the possible ramifications of a smaller blade size are.
    In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

  • #2
    Re: Blade Size

    A few things come to mind.
    Your depth of cut at 90° is limited to 2" and 1/4" at 45°
    The rotational speed of the blade is obviously the same but the speed of the teeth at the wood is 25% slower.
    The big question for me is how did you get the blade to fit on the arbor

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    • #3
      Re: Blade Size

      Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
      The rotational speed of the blade is obviously the same but the speed of the teeth at the wood is 25% slower.
      This is indeed a major snag as it effectively slows my cutting down to an equivalent of just under 2600 rpm.

      Oh well. There's a reason to everything.

      Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
      The big question for me is how did you get the blade to fit on the arbor
      I'm pretty sure 5/8" arbor is standard for most circular type wood cutting blades in the 6" to 10" range.
      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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      • #4
        Re: Blade Size

        Originally posted by darius View Post
        I'm pretty sure 5/8" arbor is standard for most circular type wood cutting blades in the 6" to 10" range.
        You are correct, had to go out and measure it because I was almost sure it was smaller, guess I have been using the 12" cut quik too much.

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        • #5
          Re: Blade Size

          Question: I'm assuming you are putting the blades on a table saw. Is it by any chance a belt drive or do you have a small direct drive model? If belt drive you could change the motor sheave (pulley) size by one or maybe two sizes depending on blade diameter. On a true cabinet style 10" table saw the norm is to have a blade speed of 3000 RPM. You might check this with your table saw. For a 7-1/4" blade to have the same surface speed you would have to make a major speed change. Personally I would not want to run a 10" table saw arbor faster than 4000 RPM. To make the surface speed equal for both blades and assuming 3000 RPM for a 10 inch blade you would need to spin the 7-1/4 inch blade at about 5700 RPM. That would be very dangerous to do on a table saw. Please don't do that. If memory serves the OLD timer Delta 8" bench top table saw was setup for around 3000-3500 RPM and they cut very well as long as you fed the wood properly. I'm thinking of the old cast iron well made ones and not the junky portable models that came along later.

          Put simple it's best to leave things as they are and think about safety first. Just feed the wood slow when you use the 7-1/4" blade. You may want to look at 8 inch blades as an option. They cost less than 10 inch ones.

          If you ever cut up scraps that might have a stray nail in them please do NOT use a carbide tipped blade. Only use a pretty fine tooth steel blade and if you can, for safety reasons saw them with your "One Human Power" hand saw.
          Last edited by Woussko; 08-11-2008, 10:58 AM.

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