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  • Ts3660

    Got a new TS3660 this weekend. Set it up and the extension tables are not parallel with the table. Spoke with the RIDGID folks and they referred me to Home Depot to solve. A little disappointing. Also the saw seems to vibrate when it cuts. Nickel will stand on edge from startup thru cut but doesn't feel right. Anyone have similar problems.

  • #2
    Re: Ts3660

    Just install some shims to level out the extension tables. The procedure to do that is covered in your Owners Manual.

    If the TS passes the nickel test then there can't be much of a vibration issue. I'd double check the belt alignment to make sure all is well there. You also might want to play around a little and practice some different feed rates.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Re: Ts3660

      I saw a note about shimming under the rail if the table and extensions are different lengths and those shims are included. No other shims are included. Any idea where to buy thin steel shims.

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      • #4
        Re: Ts3660

        I think that's exactly the shims you need to use.

        How many did you get with your saw? There should be around a dozen or so. I had to use only one for the back rail, and 4 for the spacer between the front and back rails.
        In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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        • #5
          Re: Ts3660

          Those shims are round and need to be placed between the rail and the table ends. I would think that I would need long shims for the extensions.

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          • #6
            Re: Ts3660

            I don't think long shims would do you any good since they would simply bring the extension further away from the main table by a uniform distance. This would put you back to square one.

            Just for argument's sake, let's assume that the extension are not parallel to the miter slots by the thickness of 3 round shims in the front and 0 (zero) at shims at the back. What you'd need to do then would be (starting from the front of the table) put 3 shims on bolt 1, 2 on bolt 2, 1 on bolt 3 and no shims on bolt 4. Only then would the table be parallel.
            In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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            • #7
              Re: Ts3660

              You really don't need long shims, just put shims in the area where the bolts are. You can use pieces of paper, thin cardboard or pieces of playing cards to shim up the tables. I've even heard of people using pieces of feeler gauges as shims.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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              • #8
                Re: Ts3660

                If I put shims in at 4 points per side and retightened do you think there would be any problem with the extension moving vertical since it has less contact area?

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                • #9
                  Re: Ts3660

                  Actually, there might be a problem since a great deal of connection strength where bolts are involved has to do with friction and the little round shims take quite a bit of it away.
                  In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Ts3660

                    Just went through my 3650 to re-align and set everything back to naught as I just bought an Osborne EB-3 miter gauge. Right extension was drooping between 1/16 and 1/8 inch. I put a strip of HVAC aluminum tape below the bolts and it trued it up fine. The HVAC tape runs about .004". Does not take much.
                    I first stuck a feeler gauge in below the bolts and retightened. That's how I found the thickness I needed. Just for info: Aluminum foil is about .001 to .002 per layer, HVAC tape is about .004, and an aluminum soda can is about .007. You are correct in that you want the shim under the bolt if it is drooping, and over the bolt if it is proud.

                    Go

                    PS: I really like that Osborne. Quality product. Took a couple (actually 4) tries with the 5-cut method to get it true, but I am very happy with it so far.
                    Practicing at practical wood working

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                    • #11
                      Re: Ts3660

                      Originally posted by Gofor View Post
                      JI put a strip of HVAC aluminum tape below the bolts and it trued it up fine.
                      I would be careful with aluminum around steel (bolts) and iron, unless you use a protective layer between aluminum and steel. This is known to cause galvanic corrosion to the point where bolts can actually break and pop.
                      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Ts3660

                        Here is an update. Called Ridgid and their customer service guy was less than helpful. Then I called a local service center and he called Ridgid. They sent new extensions. Arrived in about 3-4 days. This pair drooped on both sides. Less than the other pair tilted up. Shimmed up and got a flat enough surface. Made my first project over the weekend. Doesn't kick my circuit breaker last my other saw did. Dust collector works pretty good. Blade that came with it not so good. My overall early impression is that it is certainly a good value.

                        Do have a question though. When ripping long pieces as you progress thru the cut the piece moves away from the fence. Is this due to blade alignment with the fence? When I checked blade alignment with the miter slot it wasn't perfect but didn't seem that far off. Is the adjustment of the table alignment a difficult operation? Looks like it would be very hard to get a good alignment using the recommended procedure.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Ts3660

                          Originally posted by ron9876 View Post

                          Do have a question though. When ripping long pieces as you progress thru the cut the piece moves away from the fence. Is this due to blade alignment with the fence? When I checked blade alignment with the miter slot it wasn't perfect but didn't seem that far off. Is the adjustment of the table alignment a difficult operation? Looks like it would be very hard to get a good alignment using the recommended procedure.

                          It should absoluely NOT move away from the fence on the outfeed side. That is a good way to bind up and kick.

                          1) Align blade with miter slot. The procedure in the manual is easy to follow and you can make fine adjustments. One hint, after you have checked which way the blade heels and are ready to loosen the trunion bolts, loosen three to "finger turn" strength and leave the fourth a bit tighter. Pick the fourth such that the assembly pivots around it in the way that will best align the blade. Once aligned, slowly tighten each bolt, rechecking alignment as you go.

                          You can use an adjustable square or I found a decent depth gauge at Sears ($40?) and "fabricated" a mount from some small stock and C-clamps to clip to the miter gauge. Works just fine.

                          2) Align the fence with the miter slot (again, per the manual). You have the choice of aligned front to back along its length or you can angle it out ever so slightly at the outfeed side, say 1/32. Also this is the time for checking the fence clearance and front/back "grip" to the rails.

                          3) Align the fence vertical.

                          4) Align the 0 and 45 stops properly.

                          5) Align the splitter. This one is the biggest pain in the but as the sheet metal is likely a bit racked. This took the longest for me but I finally got it. Also switched to a full kerf blade my particular splitter seemed just a bit too wide for the stock blade.

                          6) Wax and table and wax the sides of the splitter.

                          7) When feeding the board for the rip, keep moderate side pressure to the fence (watch your hand, obviously keep it behind the blade!).

                          8) RTFM a few more times.

                          #8 is probably the most important part...

                          As much as people have been knocking the TS3650 manual (I bought a TS3660) the manual is well written if you can get past the occasional bit of "Chinglish". Other than a few errors in the assembly section (I found one miss-count of the number of bolts used for a sub-assembly and the tightening of the motor mount text is still missing after belt adjustment) it is full of good information. And read it all the way through a few times, they could have done a better job of organizing some of the steps. A full read-through solves that problem.
                          Last edited by rwyoung; 08-25-2008, 09:36 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Ts3660

                            It's not uncommon to need to shim cast iron wings to make them flush with the table top. They'd have to be off quite a bit to make a difference to the cut. I'd suggest getting them as close as you can, align and square the blade, and make some cuts to see if they're true.

                            Stock blades are typically poor relative to good aftermarket blades, and the stock Ridgid blade is no exception. I'd suggest a good blade from Infinity, Forrest, Ridge Carbide, Freud Industrial, CMT, or Amana. Specifically, I like the combination of the Infinity 010-060 Hi-ATB 60 tooth blade, along with a 24 tooth TK ripper such as the Freud LU87R010, Infinity 010-124, or for a cleaner rip and more versatility, the 30T TK ATB general purpose Forrest WWII TK 30 tooth (currently on sale for ~ $62 shipped).
                            Last edited by hewood; 08-25-2008, 09:56 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Ts3660

                              Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
                              You really don't need long shims, just put shims in the area where the bolts are. You can use pieces of paper, thin cardboard or pieces of playing cards to shim up the tables. I've even heard of people using pieces of feeler gauges as shims.
                              My wife's crdit cards make excellant shim material.
                              Do like you always do,,,,,,Get what you always get!!

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