Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Pine Doors Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pine Doors

    Hi, I've just bought a couple of new pine internal doors that I intend to use in my house. I'd like to antique-pine stain the doors and then apply a wax finish - which is how the existing doors seem to be finished. Internet searches give conflicting answers about doing this though - some say I'll get a poor result if I wax directly over stain!
    Does anyone know how to best apply wax to a stained pine door please? Do I need a coat of clear varnish over the stain perhaps? These doors are called "Knotty Pine Victorian". They have a label attached to them that says "suitable for paint or stain". Label with doors also says that they are "not suitable for polishing, varnishing, waxing or treatment with teak oil". I want to end up with a smooth finish with no rough surfaces! I guessed that putting stain and then wax might be OK but unsure of this - hence my post. Thanks in advance for any advice.

  • #2
    Re: Pine Doors

    If you do want to stain pine you should look into wood conditioner products too, because pine naturally has a tendency to be blotchy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Pine Doors

      Stain tends to raise the grain on pine (or any wood). Pine benefits from a hard coat like polyurethane because it is so soft. You can use a product called Minwax polyshades that is a combination of stain and polyurethane in the same can. Honey pine is a nice colour and comes in satin or gloss finish. Just brush on 2 or 3 coats and you are done. Keep in mind that pine darkens as it is exposed to sunlight even with a UV blocker in the coating. They also make a product called wood sheen that is wipe-on.
      here is a link to Minwax

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Pine Doors

        I've had some very good results staining pine and then applying wax. However, both CPW & Wbrooks have very valid points.

        Use the conditioner, but before applying it do a little research on how to use it. There is a difference of opinion on whether you should apply the stain immediately after wiping off the condition or allow it to dry for (and here is the difference of opinion – short or long time). IOM staining while the conditioner is still wet seems to be best, but your results may vary.

        The conditioner helps to hold down the grain, but not all that much. So you need to sand, lightly, after staining. Once the surface is smooth it is time to wax.
        Dick

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Pine Doors

          Dyes will do a much more even job of coloring the wood than a stain does, they are similar dyes and stains but dyes color and stains soak in to the wood by a greater verjaring degree and pine has a very soft and very hard grains, and many do not like the extreme differences or the "blotchiness" of stains,

          there are both water based dyes and oil based dyes, and alcohol based dyes, some depends on what the top coat is to be so it does not melt the dye back into the finish,

          I would not use wax, but that is a personal opinion,

          http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPR...924&search=Dye
          http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPR...541&search=Dye
          http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPR...444&search=Dye
          more
          http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworki...t.aspx?id=2954
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Pine Doors

            After you color your door (dye, conditioner and stain, whatever), it would be a good idea to coat it with some kind of film finish, probably an alkyd or polyurethane varnish. Doors get touched a lot and need the protection.

            Wait a few days for the stain to cure, or one day for the dye to dry thoroughly. Rub the doors down gently with a gray Scotchbrite pad. Take the varnish from the can, put it in another can or bucket and thin it with paint thinner--30 to 50% thinner to 70 to 50% varnish. Use a folded cloth or strong paper towel pad, or one of those "staining pads", like a big dish scrubber that Home Depot sells, to apply. Dip the pad in the thinned varnish and just wipe it on the door. It should go on so you can see it is wet but not runny. Don't rub a lot: just smooth it on. If you miss any small places, subsequent coats will catch them. When it is dry (as little as two hours for Minwax poly), wipe on another coat. If you wait more than eight hours between coats, rough the surface up a little with a Scotchbrite pad or 320-grit sandpaper. Wipe off the dust before you recoat. Three or four coats should do the trick for a door.

            The finish doesn't build as fast as it would by brushing on full-strength, but you also don't get brush marks and stray hairs. I have used this method many times on doors, tables, bookcases, chairs, and other things.

            I have used Minwax Polyshades several times. I would not recommend it for your doors. You have to keep stirring all the time to keep the colored part mixed in well with the varnish. It is very difficult to get an even coloring on the wood. It is better than the "varnish stains" of many years ago, but still marginally useful for better looking woodwork.
            Joe Spear

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Pine Doors

              Thanks for all the suggestions. Joe's post is very helpful, but thanks to all.

              Comment

              Working...
              X