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  • Slow Sled Progress

    I have been working on my crosscut sled but it is slow going. As usual I am probably overthinking this but I was torn between quick and functional versus one sled that does it all including angled miters. Of course I am on the cheap as usual trying to build it out of just what I have on hand. Oh and I had to find a new job this week .

    I settled on putting something together as cheap as possible with a few features and figure out what I really want to build after using it for a while.

    This one is 30 x 36 to allow for a maximum of 24" cut. Removable back fence (front of sled) in case I need to cut something a little wider.

    1/2" MDF base which I had to purchase but I am going to make a couple of router table jigs as well out of that. I almost went thicker but will give this a try. I settled on oak runners instead of using some steel or aluminium which I have laying around. I used washers on the runners a la DaveT and which I noticed on my miter bar.

    The oak runners fit perfectly tight and after I screwed it in it was hard to slide. A very little sanding and some paste wax and it was sliding great.

    I was going to use a replaceable MDF fence that was sacrificial but decided against it and bought a nice oak board that will be mounted to a pine board sub-fence. The final finish on this all be just Johnson Paste wax buffed out.

    I will finish it up before the end of the weekend but here are a couple pics. Nothing spectacular or original (or very far along yet).

    Note that is the sub-fence not attached but just sitting on top. It is dead flat already but being pine it may not stay that way until I attach the oak board. I glued a 1.5" pine board I had to a 3.5" pine board at a right angle. This made a perfect 90* flat surface where the final fence will be mounted.

    More pics later when I finish.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Slow Sled Progress

    Looking Good Roy. Good luck with your job search.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Slow Sled Progress

      Originally posted by cpw View Post
      Looking Good Roy. Good luck with your job search.
      Thanks and thanks. I have worked for the same company for 15 years and usually just move around in the company. Looking forward to a change actually.

      Darn job keeps getting in the way of my hobbies!

      On the fun side I have been trying to find some nice cedar to build a few chairs. I have some rough plans and itching to get going. For a city the size of Houston it is hard to find a real lumber yard.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Slow Sled Progress

        Originally posted by RoyBullets View Post
        Thanks and thanks. I have worked for the same company for 15 years and usually just move around in the company. Looking forward to a change actually.

        Darn job keeps getting in the way of my hobbies!

        On the fun side I have been trying to find some nice cedar to build a few chairs. I have some rough plans and itching to get going. For a city the size of Houston it is hard to find a real lumber yard.
        I built my chairs out of #3 instead of the clear stuff. The knotty stuff is less than 1/4 the price of the clear around here. My material cost works out to about $40 for wood and $10 for hardware for a NYW Adirondack chair ($1.10/lf of 1x6 and $0.68/lf of 1x4).

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Slow Sled Progress

          You hit the nail on the head! The wife has been after some Adirondack chairs and table. We saw some nice ones while on vacation up north this year and I took some pictures and measurements. They are surprisingly comfortable and seem easy to build.

          The problem is I cannot find anything that is thicker than 3/4". Just recently I found out about a lumber yard that specializes in western red cedar but it is about 2 hours away. Once I get everything else settled I plan on getting a quote and plan a trip up there.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Slow Sled Progress

            Originally posted by RoyBullets View Post
            You hit the nail on the head! The wife has been after some Adirondack chairs and table. We saw some nice ones while on vacation up north this year and I took some pictures and measurements. They are surprisingly comfortable and seem easy to build.

            The problem is I cannot find anything that is thicker than 3/4". Just recently I found out about a lumber yard that specializes in western red cedar but it is about 2 hours away. Once I get everything else settled I plan on getting a quote and plan a trip up there.
            I've built mine out of 3/4 stock (nominally 1") using norms design and they are plenty strong. If you search for my posts you should find some pics.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Slow Sled Progress

              Originally posted by cpw View Post
              I've built mine out of 3/4 stock (nominally 1") using norms design and they are plenty strong. If you search for my posts you should find some pics.
              Found it. Thanks for the tip and nice chair!

              The chairs I was looking to build were a little different and had a matching foot stool and table. Every place I looked recommended true 1" for the legs and bottom runners but after your experience I will revisit this.

              Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Slow Sled Progress

                You could use 5/4 decking board...But I would definately let it sit for a few weeks. At least around here that stuff is sopping wet. Your stuff will be a little heavier, but it will also be somewhat ready for outdoors already.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Slow Sled Progress

                  Nice looking sled, Roy!

                  My Dad makes the adirondaks from PT wood decking material. They're heavy but they stay put! He put wheels on the back legs that make it a little easier to push the chairs around. They hold up really well, as we leave them outdoors all year.
                  I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Slow Sled Progress

                    Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                    Nice looking sled, Roy!

                    My Dad makes the adirondaks from PT wood decking material. They're heavy but they stay put! He put wheels on the back legs that make it a little easier to push the chairs around. They hold up really well, as we leave them outdoors all year.
                    I'm generally not too hippy dippy regarding chemicals, but I don't think I would want to build a chair out of PT wood, since there is a good chance you'll be sitting on for a few hours with exposed skin. Getting naturally rot resistant wood will cost a bit more; but makes me feel better. I don't think there is any real science to back this up; and don't claim there is. I am also hypocritical in that my deck is all PT lumber; and if I rebuild it I'll use PT lumber again.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Slow Sled Progress

                      The JET website has free downloadable plans for an ADK Chair and a footstool. Haven't built one - yet.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Slow Sled Progress

                        Originally posted by cpw View Post
                        I'm generally not too hippy dippy regarding chemicals, but I don't think I would want to build a chair out of PT wood, since there is a good chance you'll be sitting on for a few hours with exposed skin. Getting naturally rot resistant wood will cost a bit more; but makes me feel better. I don't think there is any real science to back this up; and don't claim there is. I am also hypocritical in that my deck is all PT lumber; and if I rebuild it I'll use PT lumber again.
                        Agreed and I already when down that thought trail as well. The reason for cedar is also the look. We bought my wife a nice cedar rocking chair for outside that has the most beautiful shading. After looking at the construction I felt like a could take on this project. I think I am looking for Western Red Cedar as opposed to aromatic or the more white cedar. This is so I can match the rocker.

                        Any way I plan to take a half day Friday and see if I can take the trip up to the cedar mill.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Slow Sled Progress

                          Ok almost done. Just need to finish the top with wax and build a blade guard on the back with a handle and maybe a blade guard over the middle.

                          What went well was the back fence (front of sled when pushing). I had an old piece of 2 x 12 that was about 16" long that has been setting around the garage for 8 years (admitted pack rat). I squared it up on the saw and ran 2 bolts through. Very sturdy.

                          What did not go so well was my rear fence with sub fence. Bolting works great and fairly easy to get square. The problem was I realized when complete the fence was not vertically square. After tearing it apart and working on it I got it mostly square and determined I had a tolerance stack up issue which is causing the vertical alignment issues. Basically each board is off a little in the same direction and my oak board is slightly concave on one end that I missed earlier . After all that mess I realized the vertical alignment means nothing to the accuracy of the cut.

                          This fence will probably last fine for a number of years but if I ever run across a nice 2" Oak or even another 2 x 12 pine board that is as beefy as the rear fence I might just swap it out since everything is bolted down it is pretty easy.

                          I picked up an inexpensive digital fractional caliper Friday. This thing great but also a pain. The pain part is now I have a tool to get down to .001" accuracy which just feeds my compulsive side Once you realize this is unrealistic for most woodworking you are Ok.

                          Edit: So putting it back together and chasing around < .01" over 12" I called it good. If I flip it to the fractional function it shows right on.

                          Photos attached. Sorry for the slightly blurry.

                          Oh and thanks for all the great help and advice here.
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by RoyBullets; 08-25-2008, 10:08 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Slow Sled Progress

                            Originally posted by RoyBullets View Post
                            I picked up an inexpensive digital fractional caliper Friday. This thing great but also a pain. The pain part is now I have a tool to get down to .001" accuracy which just feeds my compulsive side Once you realize this is unrealistic for most woodworking you are Ok.
                            I feel you. I just finished calibrating my table saw with a newly acquired dial indicator. The longest part was aligning the rip fence. The dial indicator kept jumping between +/- 0.005" when I slide it the entire length of the fence. I finally attributed it to the milling tolerance of the steel fence and stopped chasing the absolute 0.000 tolerance. It still bugs me though!

                            BTW, nice sled. Mine is much uglier!

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