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  • #16
    Re: Scrap wood

    Gentlemen, there is no such thing as throwing away hardwood pieces. I save mine and when the box gets too full, I force myself to come up with some small projects. Intarsia pieces make great gifts. And I have started to make small kits for my grand kids to put together, this is great fun and a good bonding experiance. Helping them do a final sand and then glueing up with a few nails. They get a real kick out of it. I started them with their own tool boxes and we are now working on some wooden toys.

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    • #17
      Re: Scrap wood

      I agree there is not such thing as scrap hardwood....I just build things like bird houses or something to use them up when they get to over flowing. I have built racks on my shop wall that holds different woods, like walnut, cedar, hackberry, hickory, and oak, that I use most of the time. When I build drawers and cabinets I try to make myself look thur the bin before I just cut something out of a long board.

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      • #18
        Re: Scrap wood

        I can't throw it away.
        I can't throw it away.
        I can't throw it away.
        Building another scrap box!
        Jim

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        • #19
          Re: Scrap wood

          My first "major" project was a scrap bin on wheels. Darn thing is full and overflowing.

          I have since implemented several rules:
          - Thin cutoffs of common wood get tossed (pine, oak, mdf, etc) because the waste there is overwhelming... I tend to turn 2x4 cutoffs 5" and longer into assemble stands and jigs.

          - Most things over 3 x 3 that is 3/4" thick gets saved as a jig, scrap filler, shim, etc because of the standard thickness being useful.

          - Plywood cutoffs more than 6" long or about 4 x 4" get saved and usually used as backer boards to prevent tearout on the router or drill press, etc. I find the longer plywood scraps (6-12") useful as backerboards for the dovetail jig.

          - Anything exotic gets saved and becomes either an accent pieces, a cutting board, or pens.

          Speaking of pens... I got in to pen turning specifically to do something with the interesting scrap pieces. I couldn't do to part with, what, $5 worth of walnut or maple... So, $400 later, I have a lathe, tools, turning kits, mandrels, face shield, apron, and a whole host of finishing materials, etc... all to save pennies worth of scrap, AND now I buy exotics (pen blanks) specifically to make pens!!!

          Sometimes my wife appears to be right in the lunacy of this hobby.

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          • #20
            Re: Scrap wood

            Speaking of pens... I got in to pen turning specifically to do something with the interesting scrap pieces. I couldn't do to part with, what, $5 worth of walnut or maple... So, $400 later, I have a lathe, tools, turning kits, mandrels, face shield, apron, and a whole host of finishing materials, etc... all to save pennies worth of scrap, AND now I buy exotics (pen blanks) specifically to make pens!!!

            Sometimes my wife appears to be right in the lunacy of this hobby.
            I have done pretty much the same. Not wanting to trash perfectly good scraps I have given pen turning a try and find it fun and also a project with near instant reward as a pen can be completed in an hour.

            Today I tried my first acrylic pen. Made it for the wife for Valentines Day.
            She loves it. I found that acrylic takes a little longer due to the finishing and the particular pen kit I used required some extra steps but it turned out great. This being my first it took me about two hours. Next one will go faster for sure.

            Attachment

            I even went the extra mile and made the reflection in the shape of a heart.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Bob D.; 02-14-2011, 12:08 PM.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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            • #21
              Re: Scrap wood

              I've never had a problem. I have a trash can under my table saw and any piece that's too small goes straight into it regardless of wood species. I have so much I want to to already (and no time to do most of it) that inventing new projects just to use scrap wood makes no sense.

              What I don't use or need goes away.

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              • #22
                Re: Scrap wood

                Originally posted by Gofor View Post
                Scrap wood? That's the stuff in the shop vac, right? I throw it in the woods.

                Go
                I even keep sawdust... makes good mulch and firestarters!

                BB
                I bleed RIDGID orange...

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                • #23
                  Re: Scrap wood

                  So far, I'm keeping them! Actually, I'm doing a bit of a test for myself as to how "minimal" my scrap is. We bought an old home (1887) about five years ago and projects to date have consisted of a cookbook library (about 8 x 10 room), the main library (about 14 x 23), the kitchen remodel with oak wainscoat all around, and a few jigs and tables for the shop tools and even some window shutters and several trim projects.

                  I use Corel Draw to plan out my cuts and have so far been very good at minimizing waste.

                  Declared "scrap" to date amounts to one trash can and one HD-paper lawn bag full of sawdust. The latter will go for garden mulch (neighbor wants it this spring) I guess. The scrap barrel is mostly small pieces less than six inches in length or width, or wood that is badly warped or knotted. That's probably going to my brother for fire wood, if he ever gets around to picking it up.

                  Pieces that are larger usually gets put into one of three five-gallon buckets (old drywall mud) and often gets picked through for everything from glue blocks to jig pieces.

                  There is a certain amount of sawdust that gets vac'd from the floor or areas where it's a mix of wood and dirt and other debris. That simply gets thrown out at the time.

                  Unfortunately most of this scrap is from new wood purchases. The old stuff in the house is generall too beat/damaged to be worth the any salvaging effort. The only exception so far being the oak wainscoat in the kitchen. Though glued and screwed, it was less than thirty years old (I'm guessing) and I was able to salvage most of it, thanks to extensive stripping and sanding and a bit of cutting.


                  CWS

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                  • #24
                    Re: Scrap wood

                    Originally posted by blboyd View Post
                    I even keep sawdust... makes good mulch and firestarters!

                    BB
                    Update; (as this thread started in 2008): My sawdust from pine, oak, and other "neutral" woods now goes to my nephew for his chicken pen. All my plane shavings do also for the nesting boxes (he swears they lay more eggs using it). I was dumping my walnut dust/shavings, but now my neighbor has me saving them as he is building a stove that runs off sawdust.

                    As for scrap, almost any solid wood that is not split and splintered or rotted gets saved for pen turners, food smokers, etc.

                    Go
                    Practicing at practical wood working

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                    • #25
                      Re: Scrap wood

                      I scrap it or put it in the fireplace (hardwood). There's always going to be more, generated at a rate that I can't possibly keep up with.

                      I sometimes take the thin strips that come from ripping boards and save them for edgebanding (if really nice) or cut them into stir sticks. I never seem to have enough stir sticks.

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