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  • New Member Deux

    Hello All,

    I recently purchased a lovingly used TS2412 saw locally and I'm getting back into woodworking after a 20 year absence. This forum came up in a search for Herc-U-Lift (it's heck to get old, and this saw is too heavy to dance with, so I'm looking for one) and I've enjoyed reading many of the very knowledgeable threads over the past couple of days.

    I'm retired after 40 years in the fire protection industry (where we use Ridgid hand and power tools daily). I just wanted to say HI in case you see me lurking about soaking up all this knowledge like a sponge.

    Regards,

    Mike

  • #2
    Re: New Member Deux

    Welcome,

    Did you install sprinkler systems or more automatic dry chemical extinguisher systems like in hoods and such?

    If you were into sprinkler systems, I'm sure some of the regulars here that are serious plumbers will be interested. Good luck with your table saw and you're right that it's not something to pickup and carry.


    Update: Looking more I see "Retired Sprinkler Fitter" and that means the plumbers should enjoy your telling about the work you've done in the past.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New Member Deux

      Welcome aboard Mike, I also picked up a used ts-3650 recently and have found the forum very helpful and full of great advice. Good luck Pat.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New Member Deux

        Welcome to the site, Mike...........
        Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

        http://www.contractorspub.com

        A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New Member Deux

          welcome Mike

          its good to have you here. there are knowledgable people here that can and will answer questions if you have them, i have had many. this is a great forum (Except for the political views) lol, Im just kiddin!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New Member Deux

            Welcome to the forums, Mike. I hope you enjoy your "lovingly used" saw and will post some project pics. We love pictures!
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New Member Deux

              Thanks for the welcome Woussko, PMR413, garager, levon, and VASandy.

              I've witnessed plenty of change in the tools and materials used in the piping industry since the mid-60's. Ridgid tools always kept pace with the change and were invaluable in the gang box or tool crib.

              My first woodworking project is re-surfacing our 20+ year old pressure treated deck. I don't know how interesting that might be for anyone (as far as pics)?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New Member Deux

                Originally posted by Mike-N-MD View Post
                My first woodworking project is re-surfacing our 20+ year old pressure treated deck. I don't know how interesting that might be for anyone (as far as pics)?
                Pics are always good! I've got a client for my Help With Housing job that needs new deck boards. Some tips and pics on how that's done would help with that project.
                I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New Member Deux

                  Because the deck boards are laid out in a herringbone pattern I want to retain, I'm replacing the old CCA with 5/4 x 6 ACQ. The newer composites aren't designed for the span length on a 45 for my 16" OC joists.

                  The few tips I'd pass along so far are:

                  1. Get a slide hammer style nail extractor if your decking is attached with drive screws or nails.
                  2. Unless your new decking is bone dry, install it with no gap between boards. It will dry in place and create a very nice nominal 1/4" gap.
                  3. Use a mechanical, scissor car jack to relieve any edge bow.
                  4. Use a screw gun and screws versus nails or drive screws. It's worth the small investment if you don't already have a screw gun, makes for a superior job cosmetically (no hammer divots), and makes future replacement a snap.

                  I'll try to post some pictures later to illustrate the points above. It rained here today, so the decking project had to be put aside.

                  I spent the time instead constructing a strongback that I'll use to relieve some sag in the deck where a bay window enters the deck space. The window is cantilevered from the house joist system and a parallel (to the window's end plate framing) deck end plate was attached with lag bolts and joist hangers attached to it support the house side of 7 deck joists. I don't like the setup, so I'm giving it some needed support with the strongback running perpendicular to those joists and tied into joists on either end that are not involved in the bay framing. Big fun.

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                  • #10
                    Re: New Member Deux

                    Thanks for posting. Sounds interesting, Mike. I usually try to pick out deck boards that aren't bowed, but often you don't have a choice. I've been known to refuse entire deliveries of decking because the supplier sent too many bowed pieces. 84 Lumber still has me on their "don't talk to" list, I think.

                    Help With Housing, a charitable organization I work for, got 3 tons of Trex donated to us. The Trex company is pretty good about supporting local organizations, and we're real happy to have the material. I'm curious as to why you say composites can't take the stress of the installation you're talking about. Is there something inherently weak in the composites? I don't build with this material often, so I'm curious about your opinion.
                    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New Member Deux

                      Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                      Thanks for posting. Sounds interesting, Mike. I usually try to pick out deck boards that aren't bowed, but often you don't have a choice. I've been known to refuse entire deliveries of decking because the supplier sent too many bowed pieces. 84 Lumber still has me on their "don't talk to" list, I think.
                      The deck is between 650 and 700 square feet and herringboned from a double joist that bisects the centerline of the bay window. The original builder spliced quite a few boards on the run. I wanted to go back in with continuous runs, so I needed roughly 75% of my 5/4 x 6 boards to be 16'. So far, I've had less than 1% of the boards I'd consider dunnage. An edge variation of 1/2" to 1" in 16' is nominal, and I take it out with the scissor jack as I screw the boards to the joists.

                      Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                      Help With Housing, a charitable organization I work for, got 3 tons of Trex donated to us. The Trex company is pretty good about supporting local organizations, and we're real happy to have the material. I'm curious as to why you say composites can't take the stress of the installation you're talking about. Is there something inherently weak in the composites? I don't build with this material often, so I'm curious about your opinion.
                      I researched about every kind of decking I could find and opted to go back with wood rather than re-working the joist system to 12" OC, or (as I mentioned) losing the herringbone pattern. Cost was a consideration as well with composites running close to 300% of wood--and add another 25% to that if you use their stretcher, rail, and baluster system.

                      From Trex Installation Guide for Commercial Decks, Boardwalks & Marinas, Residential Decks, Light Duty Docks, Residential/Daycare Playground :

                      At a 45˚ angle, maximum joist spanning is 4" less than below chart.

                      Trex Decking and Railing Span Chart (on centers)

                      Decking Loading - 100psf - 100psf - 200psf
                      5/4 Boards ---------16"-------16"-------12"

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