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  • #16
    Norm may well have all 10 of his digits but he has also stated many times that the blade guard has been removed only for the benefit of the camera. I can't recall him ever saying it's OK to work without the blade guard, except for dados of course, but I do recall a few times when he has pointed out that it's unsafe to work without a blade guard/splitter. Using the blade guard/splitter that came with my table saw has never caused me a single problem but on a couple of occasions it has prevented a possible injury. I'm gonna keep using mine.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #17
      What's a bigger nuisance? The blade guard or a missing finger?
      The only time the blade guard is big nuisance with me is when I crosscut at an angle. The wood sometimes pushes or catches the blade guard and forces it into the blade. This is the plastic stock guard on the 3612. Still better than losing a finger.
      www.TheWoodCellar.com

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      • #18
        Sorry----while lazy was not my word----if the shoe fits. It's not even a discussion----if you don't use a guard, you're taking a risk----or better stated, a great risk than if you had the guard in place.

        It's a risk to drive a car, but it's an even greater and wholey unnecessary risk to drive without a seatbelt. There are excuses for not wearing a seatbelt, but like blade guards----as so many paramedics have said---they've never cut a dead person out of a seatbelt.

        I have no objection to anyone not using a guard/splitter, but please, just don't try to sell the point as if it has equal advisability as using a guard.

        There are dangers to many power and hand tools----but I enjoy the hobby too much to be out of commission from a preventable injury.
        Dave

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        • #19
          I have to tell you, after all these comments, I went back to using there blade guard all the time!
          Alright, good for me!! Wrong, I have adjusted the crap out of that thing and it still pulls work of the fence or binds. No I didn't miss a step; yes I have read the manual. I set up my saw over the course of 8hrs! yep 8hrs, why? Because I measure and squared everything to spec. But the thing that took the longest was aligning the guard, about 3hrs + 2 hrs last night. Simply put it is not a good and I do not recommend using it if you need precision cuts, however if you would like some safety you should use a knife slotted into a hole just behind your blade.
          Mick Chambers<br />Keller TX<br />buyukan@yahoo.ca

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          • #20
            "--they've never cut a dead person out of a seatbelt."
            While seatbelts REDUCE the incidents of fatalities, they do not ELIMINATE their occurance. Dale Ernhardt was wearing a seatbelt, wasn't he? Even so, I doubt that any knowledgeable person would advocate that drivers, professional or otherwise, avoid wearing seatbelts.

            I learned to ride a bicycle without wearing a helmet. I was trained to use a tablesaw without a guard (Unisaw had one, but it truely was an obstacle). But I won't allow my grandchildren to ride without wearing a helmet, and they will learn to use all shop equipment with the proper safety procedures, including a saw guard.

            I guess I will need to start using my guard if I expect them to do likewise. They have picked up too many of my other bad habits already.
            If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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            • #21
              Deblieux----kids do keep us honest, don't they. As to seatbelts---I was just citing a famous/frequent quote. You're correct---they reduce fatalities---but to be honest with you, whenever I read about some multiple person auto accident----the ones alive to talk about it were in their seatbelts---they go to the funerals of those who didn't.

              Mick---I don't know exactly how your particular guard assembly is constructed, but on mine---(old Craftsman and same on early Ridgid's) I'd first check the actual splitter assembly as being straight----then see if it's square to the mounting post----on mine, there are also some set screws to align the main body of the guard with the mounting bracket. Of course, don't forget---even if you have the guard perfectly assembled, if your blade is out of alignment, that could also do what you describe. There's a lot of alignment tricks to learn and it does sometimes take some time. Good luck.
              Dave

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              • #22
                Mick, every so often, I check the bolts that mount the Guard Assembly to the Spreader Support Arm. It happens very rarely but they have come loose on me. If that happens, it doesn't take much at all to throw the alignment of the spliter off.
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Deblieux:
                  Dale Ernhardt was wearing a seatbelt, wasn't he?
                  Nope. He had unhooked it just before the crash.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by srs:
                    </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Deblieux:
                    Dale Ernhardt was wearing a seatbelt, wasn't he?
                    Nope. He had unhooked it just before the crash. </font>[/QUOTE]What???

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                    • #25
                      It has never been disputed that Dale Ernhardt was wearing his seat belt at the time of the crash. Whether you accept NASCAR's story that the belt broke, or whether you believe the medics report that they unbucked him, the point remains the same, he was wearing his seat belt, and it didn't prevent his death from head injury.
                      So to keep this thread on message, the leason demonstrated is YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY, and you cannot relinguish your safety to another person, equipment or some device. That's the reason skydivers pack their own 'chutes.
                      If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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                      • #26
                        Did I open a can of worms with this one? It looks like you live on one side or the other on this issue. I don't guess I would want to live in a black or white world. Maybe I should ask if a Ridgid table saw fence is any good. That could be fun.

                        [ 08-10-2004, 11:40 AM: Message edited by: messmaker ]

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                        • #27
                          Mick said it took him a long time to adjust his blade guard. I agree. I just put my 3650 together and that was by far the most frustrating part of the assembly. I would really like to see the adjustment taken care of by small turns of set screws rather than the loosening and tightening of those two bolts in the back. Cheesy.

                          For being such an important safety feature, it should be redesigned. It was the only component that immmediately made me consider an after-market solution. Everything else about the saw seems great.

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                          • #28
                            I don't want to participate in all the arguements, but I do have a valid question: I currently do not use a blade guard because I often make very accurate measurements on a piece to crosscut, and I like to "sneak up" on the mark. I can't see Sh*&$# with the blade guard on. How does everyone else handle this?
                            Also, I use a miter guage with a long extension, and the blade guard would rest on that, so I just remove the thing.

                            [ 08-25-2004, 09:55 AM: Message edited by: Vigs ]

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                            • #29
                              Vigs,

                              Earlier this morning I was at Woodcraft and was looking at the Incra 2000 Miter Guage. It has an incremental setting ability that allows you to set and adjust the length of your cutoffs in 1/64" increments. It uses detents so you can actually count and feel each adjustment as you make it. The fence on this unit is 27" long. As long as you know the exact length of your cut, sneaking up on a cut shouldn't be necessay. It's not an inexpensive miter guage though, Woodcraft wanted $180+tax.

                              Dave
                              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I have the incra and it works well. It is accurate and very easy to make repeatable cuts. The downside is that is needs to be recalibrated for blade changes if you want to use measurements on it.
                                www.TheWoodCellar.com

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