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Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

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  • Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

    I'm curious as to whether it's deemed acceptable to finish a cutting board using an analine dye, and then coat that with an FDA approved wax or oil (beeswax or danish oil, or something like that)?

    As I've heard, analine dyes used to be quite toxic, but that's possibly not the case anymore? Am I taking a risk by even considering this combination? Obviously I don't want to end up with a cutting board that I can't cut food on without fear of contaminating it

    If this approach is no good, I wonder if anyone can recommend a deep/dark coloured finish I could use that would be safe?

    Thanks,
    Jeff

  • #2
    Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

    Aniline dyes tend to fade in light. They can also react with other chemicals. They can be toxic and carcinogenic. I don't think I would use aniline dye on a cutting board that would be used for food or exposed to cleaning solutions in the kitchen. I have used them for furniture that I have made. In that, they are sealed in with some type of film finish, like a varnish or lacquer. On a cutting board you don't want a film finish, and that could give you food contamination problems.
    Joe Spear

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    • #3
      Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

      I have been making a lot of cutting boards recently and started using mineral oil after originally using a salad bowl finish. Personally I like the mineral oil much better. Easier to find, cheap, and the finished product looks much nicer (IMO).

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      • #4
        Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

        I think carbonBased is more interested in the color than the finish. When I make cutting boards, I use a variety of woods, some dark some light. I don't stain or dye to change the color because the coloring agents might be toxic and will certainly be lightened or scraped away completely on a working cutting board. Different colored woods will give you variety. Most woods when oiled--either with mineral oil or some other appropriate, non-film-forming oil--will get to be a darker color. Experiment on sample boards to see if you can get a look you like.
        Joe Spear

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        • #5
          Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

          I agree with only using different woods for colour, never add a stain to a cutting board. I always use mineral oil now as well, salad oil can actually go rancid. One option to add some exotic woods to a cutting board is to purchase pen blanks, you can get them for less than $2 and will yield 7 3/4 X 3/4 X 3/4 pieces, good way to add rosewood, purple heart, etc if you don't want to buy larger pieces.

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          • #6
            Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

            I recently discovered, and just last night used Tried and True finish, specifically the Danish oil for two cuttings boards. Low VOC, food safe, etc etc. As is usual with almost every oil finish, it adds a hint of yellow and darkens whatever wood(s) you're applying it to.

            http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/

            http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/danish.htm

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            • #7
              Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

              Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
              I recently discovered, and just last night used Tried and True finish, specifically the Danish oil for two cuttings boards. Low VOC, food safe, etc etc. As is usual with almost every oil finish, it adds a hint of yellow and darkens whatever wood(s) you're applying it to.

              http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/

              http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/danish.htm
              Yep, that's actually what I'm using now, and I quite like the finish. I'm just building a simple cutting board, partially because I don't have a good one, and partially to hide an imperfection in my counter top I'm just using the cheapest hardwood from HD (poplar) and the danish oil actually makes it look quite nice!

              Cheers,
              --Jeff

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Cutting board finish (Analine no good?)

                I would not ever use a stain or sealer on a cutting board other than mineral oil. I`ve been using mineral oil for years on wood cutting boards and recommend it for the ones that I make. It takes several coats applied over days to seal raw wood, apply, let soak in, apply again. The wood will tell you when it`s sealed. Won`t except more oil. Then you have to maintain the board over time or it will dry out and crack. Always dry off your board after washing and stand up to finish drying. Apply more oil often. That's what I do. If you want colors in your wood go check out your local hardwood dealer. You will be surprised with the color and texture/density of the wood.

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