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Need help cutting bevels on table saw

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  • Need help cutting bevels on table saw

    I am about to start my next project, a set of speakers. They have bevel cuts on te top, bottom, and all side pieces. This will be my first attempt at cutting bevels and want to make sure the box is square and has clean joinery when done. Below is the instructions on making the box:

    Each speaker enclosure was constructed from the following parts:
    (2) Side panels: 11-1/2" x 6" x 3/4"
    (1) Top panel: 9" x 6" x 3/4"
    (1) Bottom panel: 9" x 6" x 3/4"
    (1) Front panel: 11-1/2" x 9" x 3/4"
    (1) Back panel: 11-1/2" x 9" x 3/4"
    ( 8 ) Horizontal internal braces: 6" x 3/4" x 3/4"
    (4) Vertical internal braces: 8" x 3/4" x 3/4"

    The side panels were mitered to 45 degrees on both 6" sides (maintaining the exterior dimension of 11-1/2"). The top and bottom panels were mitered to 45 degrees on both 6" sides (maintaining the exterior dimension of 9"). This permitted the side panels to meet with the top and bottom panels, making a 90 degree corner. All four edges of the exterior facing sides of the front and back panels were routed with a half-over router bit. All parts were biscuit joined, glued, and screwed together to ensure a solid enclosure. Holes were pre-drilled for all wood screws. All internal seams were filled with clear silicon caulk to keep the box airtight, and the enclosures were lightly filled with Acousta-Stuf.

    And a link to the project:

    http://www.partsexpress.com/projects...m?project=Sc51

    For example, if the top panel final dimension across is 9" with 45 degree bevels cut on either end do I just put a stop block on aux miter guage fence at 9" from blade, cut, flip and cut again? I am going to test out on MDF first and once I get it right use solid cherry (while the MDF ones become garage speakers). I just need some guidance on cutting bevels first.

  • #2
    Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

    First of all, good luck with your project. I've purchased from PartsExpress to rebuild a pair of Advent 6003 that I got for $20 at a tag sale and the result was excellent. I hope you get some good technicla advice regarding your mitre cuts, personally I think it will require practice and patience with the saw. Practice with the MDF and good luck with that cherry.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

      I did a trial run with MDF and so far so good. After a dry fitting of the cabinet it goes togther nicely. Now I get to test out my new biscuit joiner before final assembly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

        Let me the first to confuse you:

        You have several choices to cut the bevels:

        1. Using the fence with the board and fence on the right of the blade;
        2 Using fence with the board and fence on the left of the blade
        3 Using the miter gauge on the left side of the blade
        4 Using the miter gauge on the right side of the blade.
        5 Using a sled

        For the project you describe, using the 3650 I recommend using the miter gauge on the right side of the blade. Add an auxiliary fence to the stock miter gauge long enough to go past the blade, and higher than the blade is raised. When you push it past the blade the first time, it will give you a reference cut from which to make your measurements for the stop block location. Lay a board down on the table and trace a line along the top edge along the fence. Measuring from the cut slot, put marks at 9" and 11 1/2" on this line. That is where you will want to locate the stop block after you have put a bevel on one end of each board.

        Make a few test cuts to make sure you have the miter square to the blade, and the blade at exactly 45 degrees. Measure the cut piece for square and bevel, not just the set-up. The finished product is what counts. When pushing the miter gauge, put a little bias pressure to the outside. This will reduce any error from miter slot wobble, put you pushing away from the blade while also pushing the piece snug to the stop block.

        I know putting the board to the right of the blade is a bit more uncomfortable for a right hander, a bit more involved getting the stop block location, and a bit more difficult to keep the board flat on the table. However, it is safer, as you eliminate the risk of the board you are pushing on getting wedged between the table and blade, which can take things out of your hands (literally) and cause kickback and damaged work. But, it will also provide a smoother cut on the outside edge of the bevel if there is any tendency for tear out.

        This type of cut is where a right tilt saw has an advantage over a left tilt for the right-handed person.

        Hope this helps

        Go

        (PS: Just curious, which miter slot did you align the blade with when you did the saw set up? Most people use the inside edge of the right one, when the miter gauge is most often used in the left slot.
        Practicing at practical wood working

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        • #5
          Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

          Gofor - thank you very much. That is excatly what I did and it worked out great. I used a biscuit joiner for the first time, I'm hooked. It made the glue-up a breeze. Cant wait to mill the cherry I have to make the finished ones.

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          • #6
            Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

            It sounds like you're doing a good job on this, but I have to ask why you're using solid cherry? Wouldn't it be better to use MDF with a cherry veneer? I thought that was a better way to get really good sound out of your speakers, where as using the solid cherry will be a hit or miss attempt due to varying degrees of wood density.

            Good luck with them, by the way, what finish are you going to do to the cherry ones?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

              I am going with solid cherry for a couple of reasons. First, I have a lot of it. Secondly, I am following the original plans excatly since this is my first speaker building project. Third, I dont know much about veenering (for example, can you use veener 1/4" thick on 1/2" mdf?).

              For the finish I am probably going to just use tung oil. Not sure though, will see how it looks on a test piece and go from there.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

                Your garage speakers will sound far better than your cherry speakers. You need to use a dense material to stop the box from resonating.
                High end speakers are made from HDF (high density fiber board) and then veneered with wood. If you do plan to learn veneering this is a good size project to start with. If you want to use solid 1/4" cherry veneer that would be fine but keep the 3/4" MDF (or HDF) core. You also need to be careful using silicone caulk to seal the seams, it emanates a chemical even when dry that attacks some speaker surrounds - most notably the foam type surrounds like cerwin vega. It will take a year or more but eventually the foam will start to crumble. Watch the quality of the speaker wire connectors you choose as many of the cheaper grades will leak air and ruin your efforts to have an air tight chamber

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Need help cutting bevels on table saw

                  Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
                  Your garage speakers will sound far better than your cherry speakers. You need to use a dense material to stop the box from resonating.
                  High end speakers are made from HDF (high density fiber board) and then veneered with wood. If you do plan to learn veneering this is a good size project to start with. If you want to use solid 1/4" cherry veneer that would be fine but keep the 3/4" MDF (or HDF) core. You also need to be careful using silicone caulk to seal the seams, it emanates a chemical even when dry that attacks some speaker surrounds - most notably the foam type surrounds like cerwin vega. It will take a year or more but eventually the foam will start to crumble. Watch the quality of the speaker wire connectors you choose as many of the cheaper grades will leak air and ruin your efforts to have an air tight chamber
                  I been talking with the designer of the speakers as a few people have said MDF is a better option. From his point of the view the cabinets are small enough where using solid cherry is ok. And everyone that has heard his speakers have thought they sounded excellent.

                  A have a great ear for sound so when I am done I will know right away if something sounds off. Should that happen then I will try MDF and veener. Like I said, I have lots of cherry just sitting around and this project doesnt use very much.

                  Comment

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