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  • #16
    Re: Work Light Improvement

    Hello
    I added a worklight to my bandsaw and am happy with it. It is the one that Craftsman uses on there drill press (and probably the same as other manufacturers). It uses a 40w mini reflector bulb (same base as a standard bulb, so I guess you could use others, but the 40w is what is recommended). It has plenty of light and does not have shadows or reflections. For 21.00 (light and shipping), I think it is a good choice. Ron
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Ronald; 09-29-2008, 02:39 PM.

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    • #17
      Re: Work Light Improvement

      Hey Ronald,

      How do you like your Ridgid bandsaw?
      I'm looking to get a new one.

      Vince

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      • #18
        Re: Work Light Improvement

        Hello Vince
        It is ok for what I use it for, (light hobby work). I did have to do alot of tweaking to get it working properly.
        I believe that if I had to do it over, I would not have gotten the Ridgid. If you wait, Ridgid is supposed to come out with a more powerful one and hopfully worked out all the issues (vibration, out of balance wheels, weak power, etc) with this BS1402.
        For the money, there are better saws out there. Do a search on the forum and I believe it will show all the issues.
        People have some great things to say about the Grizzly (Grizzly.com)
        Good Luck, Ron

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        • #19
          Re: Work Light Improvement

          Originally posted by vcooney View Post
          Hey Ronald,

          How do you like your Ridgid bandsaw?
          I'm looking to get a new one.

          Vince

          I was going to go with thr Ridgid bandsaw but ended up with the Craftsman Pro 14" and love it. Havent made any tweaks and works great. Got it during a club sale for $422, hard to beat at that price. Only issue is the attached light uses its own power cord.

          Thanks to this thread I am going to get a new bulb for it, one in there now is not very bright.

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          • #20
            Re: Work Light Improvement

            Originally posted by Pez View Post
            .......... Only issue is the attached light uses its own power cord.
            Pez, I have the same issue with my bandsaw. What I did to solve that issue was to use one of these 3-Way Power Cord Outlets and some zip ties to secure the cords. I then added a 10' 12ga extension cord and that took care of that issue.
            ================================================== ====
            ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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            • #21
              Re: Work Light Improvement

              Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
              Pez, I have the same issue with my bandsaw. What I did to solve that issue was to use one of these 3-Way Power Cord Outlets and some zip ties to secure the cords. I then added a 10' 12ga extension cord and that took care of that issue.
              If I had a dime for everytime I overlooked the easiest solution I would be a very rich man. Thanks for the tip.

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              • #22
                Re: Work Light Improvement

                I've been using a compact florescent in my clip on lamp that I use under sinks when replacing fcts, disposers, etc. I mainly was tired of branding myself when I got too close to the reflector when using incandescent bulbs. Plus, it could get pretty warm under the sink cabinet after a while. The cfbs' stay relatively cool.
                "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

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                • #23
                  Re: Work Light Improvement

                  I've 'salvaged' a couple of cheap plastic clamp-on lamps by replacing the low-wattage original lamp(usually 60w max) with 23w CFLs. MUCH more light, MUCH less heat and less chance of taxing the inexpensive components of the inexpensive fixture. I have used a couple of 30w lamps in room fixtures and find that combining these with one or two incandescents in the same area will provide pleasing and comfortable light along with some heat and electricity savings. The 30w lamps are a little spendy as I have not found them in 'multi-paks' to reduce costs. Just have to use the HD or Lowe's coupons to soften the blow when purchasing these.

                  Our kitchen guy became a believer when I offered him my 23w work light to use in our attic during a particularly hot day. He couldn't believe the heat savings and later purchased one of those tripod worklights with two 42w lamps.

                  We've had a few CFLs fail prematurely but we also had our laundry room illuminated by the same two CFLs for over 8 years before we moved. I find the newer lamps to take just 30 seconds or so to reach peak output. I have replaced a half-dozen or so of our recessed lamps in the new house(replacing 75w lamps with either 20-23w CFLs) and really like the result. We'll replace the others(builder went crazy with about 18 throughout the house) as they burn out. I also need to replace a couple of vanity fixtures that use 8 halogen bulbs rated at 50w ea. The replacement bulbs are five bucks each and boy do they run hot! What were they thinkin'?

                  There is much discussion of the LEDs that should become more available in the next couple of years. I've not been there yet but Austin's Trail of Lights this Christmas is using quite a few LED displays to demonstrate the new technology and energy impact. I'll stick with CFLs until the LED price drops to a reasonable level. Ain't technology fun!

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                  • #24
                    Re: Work Light Improvement

                    I think LEDs are the future for most of our lighting needs. Unlike even CFLs, the LEDs I've used last for years, and seem unbreakable. Most of my experience has been with replacement LED units for Maglites, and tactical LED flashlights that put out very bright light. No changing bulbs and no broken glass. Still don't know why they won't introduce a cordless tool light with an LED? Maybe someone is making money off all those replacement bulbs?

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                    • #25
                      Re: Work Light Improvement

                      Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                      . Still don't know why they won't introduce a cordless tool light with an LED? Maybe someone is making money off all those replacement bulbs?
                      Probably the same folks who make the lamps for all of these $60K SUVs with one burned out fog light two weeks after purchase!

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                      • #26
                        Re: Work Light Improvement

                        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                        Still don't know why they won't introduce a cordless tool light with an LED? Maybe someone is making money off all those replacement bulbs?
                        Craftsman got a nice one:

                        ***Adjustable head that pivots
                        ***24 bright LED lights

                        Name:  03563350407e97d0609047330c8815ea.jpeg
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Size:  29.7 KB

                        Other clones probably coming soon............
                        Last edited by reConx; 12-18-2008, 08:07 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Work Light Improvement

                          They have been selling LED work light in Canadian Tire for a couple of years now. The picture shows just one of the available models. I saw two or three more in the local store.

                          As for the CFLs, I installed those in throughout the entire house about 4 years ago. Intialy they seemed a little too white, but when I installed a really cool white one (briefly) the other ones took an altogether different color. Out of about 40 or so bulbs I had to replace 3.

                          My electric bill showed on about 10% (avg) decrease in power usage over comparable periods from previous years. Not huge savings but it'll buy me a decent TS blade or two each year.
                          Attached Files
                          In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Work Light Improvement

                            Yes, LED worklights are being made by many manufacturers and the benefits to the consumer/professional are many. Much longer run times and never having to change a bulb are a couple big pluses in my opinion. Come on Ridgid.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Work Light Improvement

                              Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                              Yes, LED worklights are being made by many manufacturers and the benefits to the consumer/professional are many. Much longer run times and never having to change a bulb are a couple big pluses in my opinion. Come on Ridgid.
                              Lower energy consumption and they don't get near as hot either. About the only thing I don't like is the poor color rendering / light quality, but I'm sure that will improve with time.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Work Light Improvement

                                Hey guys,

                                I thought I'd give some input to the CFL discussion since I think I have a lot of relevant experience in using and advising people on these bulbs in general.

                                Just a little background...

                                I've worked with a company who's client is the New Jersey Clean Energy Program in getting these bulbs into the marketplace so we can prevent having to build extra power plants, reduce carbon emission, etc... What we do is donate free bulbs to NJ residents so they can try the bulbs out and become aware of them.

                                Now to the good stuff.

                                DISPOSING OF COMPACT FLOURESCENT LIGHTS

                                Anyway, the first thing I'll mention, which is VERY IMPORTANT is that you should always dispose of used CFLs properly. They should not go into your regular garbage and should not be included with your normal recycling. Since most of you guys are sure to know where your local Home Depot is you should bring your bulbs there for recycling. They have people come in to pick up these spent bulbs and recycle the mercury properly as well as the other components, which can be reused and prevent our ground water from being polluted. You can also use this as an excuse to make a trip to Home Depot.

                                CFL USES

                                Also, there are now CFL bulbs that can be used in most places. Personally I've used the normal "twisted" bulbs as well as indoor flood lamps for recessed lights and weatherproof outdoor lamps for motion detectors, etc... Also, there are 3-way and dimmable CFLs on the market now.

                                As others have said, you should look for the "light temperature" of the bulbs you're looking for. 2700k is on the lower end of the spectrum and is very close in color to a soft white incandescent bulb. It's what I use at home. On the other end you have 6500k bulbs that provide full spectrum light but is way too harsh for home use in my opinion.

                                POWER USAGE

                                Now, the bulbs are NOT rated by the heat they emit, but by the power they draw. A typical incandescent bulb can waste as much as 80% of its energy consumption just creating heat. CFLs produce relatively very little heat and most of the energy is actually used to create light instead.

                                A 60W incandescent bulbs uses 60W of power. A 13W CFL will give you the same amount of light but, of course, only use 13W of power. It's typically a 75% savings so if you spend $10/month to power a bulb in your shop normally, you would only pay $2.50/month to power an equivalent CFL. BIG savings and it definitely adds up.

                                USING CFLs IN AND AROUND THE SHOP

                                There are some things to be aware of when using CFLs and I'll give some examples.

                                #1 - They do take a minute or so to get to full brightness.

                                Like most fluorescent bulbs, CFLs do take a few moments to get up to full brightness. This is also very dependent on the ambient temperature. For example, I have 27W (100W equivalent) CFLs in the outdoor fixtures outside my house. During these cold days in NJ (~20 degrees) they take a few minutes to heat up and give full light output, but that's ok by me. The same happens in my poorly insulated and non-heated attached garage.

                                #2 - CFLs do not take well to quick on/off cycles.

                                CFLs shouldn't be turned off and on quickly (think what the teacher used to do to gets kids' attention in school). If you're going through a hallway or use the bathroom and then turn them off, that's fine. But two nights ago I opened the garage door to take care of the garbage for the next day. When I went to close the door, something was blocking the safety sensors and the light on the motor flashes on and off probably 10 times. This combined with how cold the bulb was made it start buzzing. So now when I turn the light on the bulb's ballast buzzes for a few seconds and then quiets down. My fault.

                                #3 - CFLs are a major advantage in a light socket with a low wattage rating.

                                If the light on your bandsaw or any other fixture warns you not to use an incandescent bulb more than, let's say 60W, you can easily put in a 100W CFL with no fear of fire. Why? The socket's wiring is designed for up to 60W of power running through it. A 100W CFL only uses 27W of power so you're not even at half the rating for the socket. Light lovers rejoice!

                                #4 - CFLs last 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs.

                                It's true. Normal incandescents typically last up to about 1000 hours. And in a recent issue, Consumer Reports tested CFLs of different brands and most of them lasted through to publication time, which was 10,300 hours! This is a huge benefit in that you don't have to replace bulbs as often, especially some hard to reach bulbs that are a PITA to change.

                                I hope that's summarized some of the points other people made as well as brought some new benefits to mind. I've changed every possible bulb in my house to CFLs and couldn't be happier. Honestly, I don't profit from anyone buying CFLs, but I do think that it's a small change we can make that makes a huge difference when we all do it.

                                If there's something I didn't cover or you have any questions, ask away!

                                Helder
                                www.feesha.com

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