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  • Work Light Improvement

    I have a work light similar to one like this on my bandsaw


    The specs said not to use a bulb rated higher than 60W in it but I found that size bulb didn't give off enough light for me. I replaced the standard 60W bulb with a DAYLIGHT 60 Compact Fluorescent Bulb which resulted in a huge improvement. Not only did the DAYLIGHT bulb produce more illumination but it also reduced the amount of shadow.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.


  • #2
    Re: Work Light Improvement

    BD Can these compact CFL's tolerate some vibration from these power tools? Would you go up in wattage since they generate less heat and use less comparative wattage, say 100 watt CFL?

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    • #3
      Re: Work Light Improvement

      smart thinking Badger Dave, im going to try this on my bandsaw and drill press. both of their lights are so poor, this simple but ingenious idea seems very innovative. sometimes a small thing can help so much! thank you from a novice!

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      • #4
        Re: Work Light Improvement

        Good idea DB. I can assure everyone that they can withstand the vibration, I have had the same 23W in my drill press for 2 years, I also use them in my garage door opener and ceiling fans

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        • #5
          Re: Work Light Improvement

          Be sure to check measurements of the cylinder and the replacement CFL lamp. Also note that what are called "Full Spectrum" CFL lamps put out a bright crisp light. What are called "Soft White" are more gentle but not as bright. They (Full Spectrum or Daylight type) are good for shop use but you won't like one in say a bedroom or bathroom. In there you need a warmer and softer light.

          Most CFL lamps can take some vibration OK. You might want to see if you can find plastic encapsulated ones for safety. They have a sort of pear shape more like a regular A shape light bulb.

          Hint: If you want loads of light the CFL lamp actual Watt rating gives an idea of heat. You could try a 23 Watt CFL lamp and really get more light but do watch the size of it.

          WBrooks is right about vibration. They can take it. What you don't want is to have one get smashed.

          At Home Depot they sell TCP (TCP = huge manufacture) brand CFL lamps under some name like N Vision. They come in color coded packages. The green ones are about 2700K color temp and are warm. The red ones are about 3500K and are neutral and brighter looking. The blue ones are 5000-6500K and are light bright daylight. These light up work shops well but make people look like ghosts. They put out a blue light like the sky on a clear day.

          Lowes sells mostly Sylvania and they have different color temp CFL lamps too. Try to look for "Full Spectrum" on the package. Those are the really bright daylight type. For around the house the "Soft White" are more like regular light bulbs and the "Bright White" are a nice bright and more neutral white.
          Last edited by Woussko; 09-28-2008, 05:29 PM. Reason: Little goofs

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          • #6
            Re: Work Light Improvement

            Originally posted by reConx View Post
            BD Can these compact CFL's tolerate some vibration from these power tools? Would you go up in wattage since they generate less heat and use less comparative wattage, say 100 watt CFL?
            As far as the vibration issue is concerned, I'll have to wait on that a bit to find out the answer. I just installed that bulb today so I don't think 5 minutes of run time is a real good test. Also, my bandsaw will easily pass the nickel test.

            As far as your second question is concerned, I haven't a clue. Maybe someone with more knowledge about that kind of stuff will chime in. If it would be possible to bump up to the next size bulb safely I'd certainly do that.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              Re: Work Light Improvement

              i had been thinking out in my shop a few minutes ago that the heat generated with regular incandescent bulds would be much more . any help in a south ga. shop with the heat factor would be greatly appreciated.

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              • #8
                Re: Work Light Improvement

                The CFL's are rated with their heat output. A 15W CFL puts out 15W of heat but has the equivalent light output of a 60W bulb. You could use a 60W CFL bulb which would have an approximate light output of 240W. That said the largest CFL I have seen for far is 42W

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                • #9
                  Re: Work Light Improvement

                  on the vibration factor, the cfls have to take as much vibration as an incandescent. in my ceiling fans incandescents lasts about as long as a good burp. incandesants are maybe made so they dont last long. i dont know? but what i do know is they dont last. after replacing my ceiling fan bulbs with cfls, i have no problems. they are worth the price. i, as for one dont think Badger Dave will be disappointed. i wonder if people who have used cfls will agree with me?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Work Light Improvement

                    Originally posted by levon View Post
                    i wonder if people who have used cfls will agree with me?
                    I think CFLs can make sense on power tools and I like the potential cost savings and decreased heat output. I tried a 6 pak set of CFLs a few years ago in my basement recess lighting and I did not have good results to justify their expense over regular incandescent bulbs. The package stated that they save on energy costs because they provide similar lighting at lower wattage. The package also stated they last 7 years. The fine print stated they last 7 years if only used for four hours per day. Those CFLs died a relatively quick death one-by-one until I replaced them all with regular 65W incandescent bulbs. With electricity rates on the rise I tried another 6 pak set of CFLs in the kitchen chandelier. The complaints this time were from the wife and family: The CFLs made the food on the table strange looking and unappetizing even though it tasted great. So out went the CFLs and potential savings in my household until BD came up with this great idea....
                    Let me know your experiences with CFLs.....

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                    • #11
                      Re: Work Light Improvement

                      MONSTER CFL LAMPS

                      These are something you would normally only use in commercial applications and they are not compact if you ever saw one. They do have threaded bases and built-in ballast so they can replace regular high Wattage light bulbs.

                      These have big MOGUL size bases. They replace 500 and 750 Watt light bulbs and I can tell you these really pour out light.
                      http://www.1000bulbs.com/150-to-200-...ct-Fluorscent/

                      These have regular MEDIUM threaded bases and can replace regular high Wattage light bulbs.
                      http://www.1000bulbs.com/105-Watt-Compact-Fluorescent/

                      Here is more general info: http://www.1000bulbs.com/2-to-200-Wa...n-Light-Bulbs/

                      Home page to many lighting products. This is interesting reading. I do NOT in any manor work for this company and I do NOT receive any $$$ when they sell things. I'm just a customer.
                      http://www.1000bulbs.com

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                      • #12
                        Re: Work Light Improvement

                        reConex

                        You may want to give them another try. As for making a mess out of colors that was and still can be an issue. If you can find them the 3000 - 3500K Color temp ones look best in most residential applications. The 2600 - 2700K to me look too orange and the higher temps above 3600K while crisp make people look ghastly at times. There have been major improvements in all types of fluorescent lighting in the past few years, but it still takes some testing to find the right tubes or CFL lamps. One important factor is the Color Rendering Index. It's in the fine print. Anything under 70 is not good and if you can find 80 or higher it's worth paying a little more for it. I'm sure before long there will be more improvements. Efficiency and life are one thing but we need to be able to stand the light they put out.

                        Now if anyone wants to just puke, try the yellow sodium vapor lights (think street lighting) indoors or try a clear mercury vapor lamp at night outside and see what it does to change all colors. <Rant Off>


                        Ievon
                        When it comes to ceiling fans try "Vibration Service" industrial light bulbs if you ever find that CFLs are too big for a given fixture.
                        Last edited by Woussko; 09-28-2008, 09:56 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Work Light Improvement

                          I've seen mechanics using CFL's in their drop lights for years. The obvious reason is they can with stand the occasional (frequent?) bump much better than incandescent lights. I've been using them in several drop lights for several years and yet to have a problem, of course these lights aren't getting much use, but they have been bumped, dropped a few times and they're still going strong.

                          What the others have said regarding wattage and color temperature are on the mark.
                          Dick

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                          • #14
                            Re: Work Light Improvement

                            I've been using the 23W "daylight" bulbs throughout my entire workshop and in my portable magnetic base worklights which I only use in my finishing area for extra light when I need it.

                            However, they are generally considered a poor choice anywhere you are going to be turning a light on and off, either in a short period of time, or repeatedly. The bulbs generally take more than a few minutes to warm up to their full light capabilities, and they (according to something I read somewhere) the on/off/on/off shortens their life.

                            With that said, in a small shop the difference in brightness vs. normal 60w bulbs is huge, AND the decrease in heat generation is also great.... unless you want heat. ;-)

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                            • #15
                              Re: Work Light Improvement

                              there is a wealth of knowledge on this forum. i i know i cant retain or even understand all of it, but some of is is bound to sink in. its really great to have a place to learn new and even old tricks i didnt already know. i am glad to be a member of rigid forum.

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