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  • Ts 3660

    I have been reading about which saws can take stacked dado blades. I am building a roll top desk and would prefer to make the dados with the saw rather than a router. What are your thoughts and suggestions? Skocars

  • #2
    Re: Ts 3660

    I think the 3660 would be a fine saw for stacked dados. It can take up to just shy of 1", around 15/16 or so, I think (I've gone up to 3/4" on my 3650). It's got enough muscle to plow 3/4" dados 1/2" deep in maple, so I think it does pretty good!!

    A good dado set is worth the investment. Freud apparently makes a very good set. I have a cheapo jap knock-off that does ok. I'd rather have 4-tooth chippers, but I make do. I have a little manual "router" that I use to flatten the dados because my dado set is pretty nasty.

    If you're looking to dado for plywood, you need to get a set that'll do weird fractions. A 1/4" sheet of plywood isn't 1/4". It's just shy. If that's what you need to do, a dedicated router bit and router is the way to go. They make router bits specifically for 1/4" and 1/2" plywood. What I end up doing for 1/4" is using a standard blade and multiple passes till it's just the right size.

    Remember, when you put your dado set on the saw, you don't need to use the large washer that goes between the blade and the arbor nut. A dado set doesn't need that washer, and it gives you that extra room on the arbor for blades.

    Good luck with the roll-top! Sounds like a great project. I hope however you go, you'll post some pictures.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Ts 3660

      Something to keep in mind is that unless you need depth and few people would, you can save some $$$ buying an 6" dado blade set over a 8" one. The 6" will load the motor less.
      http://www.freudtools.com/p-313-super-dado-sets.aspx

      Please see #SD506
      These can be adjusted by 1/32" increments which comes in nice for doing plywood and such.

      VASandy, You may want to put this set on your "Dear Santa" list as I bet you would love them.
      Last edited by Woussko; 10-14-2008, 11:16 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: Ts 3660

        Originally posted by Woussko View Post
        Something to keep in mind is that unless you need depth and few people would, you can save some $$$ buying an 6" dado blade set over a 8" one. The 6" will load the motor less.
        http://www.freudtools.com/p-313-super-dado-sets.aspx

        Please see #SD506
        These can be adjusted by 1/32" increments which comes in nice for doing plywood and such.

        VASandy, You may want to put this set on your "Dear Santa" list as I bet you would love them.
        Thanks, Woussko. Yeah...they'll be on the list this year.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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        • #5
          Re: Ts 3660

          Thank you for your rapid reply. You answered all my questions and I am now enjoying my new stacked dado set. Today I began making two zero clearance throat plates and will have them for two of my most often used dado widths. I am using a set of 6 inch.

          Loren

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          • #6
            Re: Ts 3660

            How deep can you go with a 6" as opposed to an 8". I can't imagine I would need a dado greater than 3/4" for what I'm considering. But I wanted to validate before I purchased a 6". I can see the benefit on motor load too.

            Cheers,
            Ryan

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            • #7
              Re: Ts 3660

              I did a quick search and found the depth to be aproxx 1 - 1/8 to 1 - 1/4 inch which is more than enough for what I'd be doing I think.

              Ryan

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              • #8
                Re: Ts 3660

                Quick math for depth of cut:

                For 6" set, subtract 2" from max height of your 10" saw blade. 8", subtract 1".

                The 6" is less expensive, and the load on the motor may be less, but smaller size does not equal faster feed rate. With the 6", the speed of the teeth when it hits the wood is 75% of the 8". As a test I put a 7 1/4" 16 tooth thin kerf rip blade on my 3650 to rip some 1 3/4" walnut for a table I am building. Thought that it should have just ate through the wood. I then put a 10" 60 tooth thin kerf blade on it. Feed rate was the same, motor noise (bog down) appeared to be the same, but the cut was much much smoother. Sometimes what sounds good in theory does not produce the expected results in practice.

                I have the Freud SD208 and have had no problem with it. Bought the set 2nd hand for $50 from someone upgrading to the SD508.

                Go
                Last edited by Gofor; 10-15-2008, 06:24 PM.
                Practicing at practical wood working

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