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  • counter top

    a friend is having his laundry room redone and has asked me to do the reno. presently there is the front load washer with the dryer next to it with a counter top over the top of both units. a sink with taps sits next to the washer and is built into the counter top. the new washer and dryer arrive next week and are 3" taller than the existing ones and he wants the counter top raised up to suite. he wants the sink to remain at the level it is now and wants me to cut the counter top about 5" beyond the sink and raise it about 4" to clear the new units. he is firm about this and also does not want the sink or taps to be disassembled. so this leaves me with trying to cut the counter top while it is attached to the cabinets below and also the backsplash attached to the wall. i believe i can use my jigsaw to cut the top portion of the counter until i meet up with the included lip of the backsplash. the lip at this point is about 4" on the vertical attached to the wall. should i perhaps use a handsaw to cut this portion? i hope i explained this well enough. can anyone help me?

    thank you

  • #2
    Re: counter top

    A circular saw would be better than a jigsaw to cut the horizontal counter. You can set the depth on the saw so you don't cut the top of the cabinet. Countertops have about 2" of overhang.

    You should really try to convince him that the sink and taps have to be temporarily disconnected. You probably won't be able to match the existing counter and it'll look silly to have 2 color countertops in there. The attached backsplash is a real problem. I don't know how you'll get beyond that.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: counter top

      There are flush cut bits available for jigsaws that project the blade teeth out to the front edge of the sole plate. One could be used to cut the backsplash.

      You could also probe the area behind the backsplash for pipes and wiring by opening a small access hole in the wallboard over the backsplash. If there is clearance, use a reciprocating saw to cut the backsplash.

      Fabricate a "riser" to match the cabinets and the depth of the countertop and the height that you need. Install it at the end of the countertop with the sink in it. Rest (and fasten) the cutoff countertop on it to extend over the washer/dryer. You will have to treat the raw end of this section of countertop. A rabit (rebate) in the top of the "riser and/or some hardwood edging will cover the raw end.

      I am sure that you are aware that this counter will have to be removed if the washer is ever replaced with a top loading model.

      Good luck
      Bill

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      • #4
        Re: counter top

        You can get a fine tooth blade that cuts on the down stroke for your sabre (jig) saw. Use this until you get to the backsplash. Finish the cut with a fine tooth (12 point) hand saw. Any marring of the wall will be below the counter if all is done properly. A straight edge clamped to the counter will give you a nice straight cut and make it easier to smooth both sides of the cut to apply a finish. i.e. laminate, wood, or whatever you are planning to use.

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        • #5
          Re: counter top

          I can understand leaving something intact because it has historical value, is delicate, or requires tremendous effort to disassemble or remove. But, from the tone of your post it seems your friend simply does not trust you or anyone else to close the valves and disconnect the plumbing to his sink.
          I would walk. No way somebody is goanna tie my hands like that. Friend or not, explain that the difference between a proper disassembly leading to a proper installation verses trying to work around unreasonable restrictions, is the difference between a job well done and garbage.
          Do it properly or walk. My .00001 cents.
          Steve.

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          • #6
            Re: counter top

            One thing, you mentionned jigsaw blades and cut smoothness.... I bought these a few weeks ago, but got to try them out last night. I know it may be too soon to give rave reviews since I've only done a little cutting with them, but they did a phenominal job of cutting (for a jigsaw blade)! No sanding at all. Though of course, all I cut was MDF (so far), but it still did a great job.

            http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-T308B-2-...7292053&sr=8-1

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            • #7
              Re: counter top

              Originally posted by CCusson View Post
              One thing, you mentionned jigsaw blades and cut smoothness.... I bought these a few weeks ago, but got to try them out last night. I know it may be too soon to give rave reviews since I've only done a little cutting with them, but they did a phenominal job of cutting (for a jigsaw blade)! No sanding at all. Though of course, all I cut was MDF (so far), but it still did a great job.

              http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-T308B-2-...7292053&sr=8-1
              I just bought that set of blades for my Bosch jig saw... I understand that they are TRULY SUPER blades... per Lang of Pop.WW'g recently.

              Can hardly wait for them to get here from Amazon!!

              I LOVE that jig saw!!
              Have FUN! Joe ... www.woodworkstuff.net ..... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showg...0&ppuser=1389/

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