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  • Putting tools in storage

    Hello Everybody

    I have a bit of a problem. I'm the proud owner of a TS-3650 and a Ridgid 12 Miter Saw along with a bunch of other tools. I know, that's not really the problem. The problem is that I'm moving to Japan in July and I will have to put all my tools into long term storage (military is paying for it). I'd like to hear some of your ideas on how I can protect the tools best for being in storage for at least 3 years.

    I'm thinking some kind of rust protection for the table tops, but what I'm not sure on is blade protection etc.

    Thank you in advance for any ideas or suggestions (except for storing at your house)

  • #2
    Re: Putting tools in storage

    The first thing that comes to mind is if the storage facility is climate controlled. I would probaby put apply a fresh coat of something like paste wax right before they are stored. Keeping everything well sealed may help as well. I dont have any experience with this sort of thing but those are couple of places to start.

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    • #3
      Re: Putting tools in storage

      For the 3650 I'd give it a good dousing in boeshield or equivalent protectant and leave it on thick, don't wipe dry. Then wrap it up tight from top to bottom in plastic. I don't think the other stuff would be too big of a problem other than storing it in a box.

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      • #4
        Re: Putting tools in storage

        A product named "Penitrol" would be good for protecting saw blades and hand tools. It can be found in the paint departments in the big box stores and larger hardware chains.

        It can also be used to coat the cast iron top.

        It was originally intended for mixing with paint to improve its holding power but it works good as a metal surface protector. Brush it on full strength.

        Good luck in Japan. Some really good food there. Try the Yakatori, a Dutch influence in Japanese cuisine.

        Bill

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        • #5
          Re: Putting tools in storage

          Cosmoline comes to mind, but its a PITA to get off, and I don't know where you'd find it, unless you're an armory guy.

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          • #6
            Re: Putting tools in storage

            Originally posted by ratfusion View Post
            Cosmoline comes to mind, but its a PITA to get off, and I don't know where you'd find it, unless you're an armory guy.
            PITA is right, the best way to get that stuff off is with gasoline, not something I want to pour all over my tools.

            Thanks for the tips and suggestions. It better be climate controlled, my antique china cabinet is going to be in there with my tools.

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            • #7
              Re: Putting tools in storage

              Originally posted by ratfusion View Post
              Cosmoline comes to mind, but its a PITA to get off, and I don't know where you'd find it, unless you're an armory guy.
              I'm pretty sure thats the stuff my jointer came covered in from the factory. I would never want to have to remove that again.

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              • #8
                Re: Putting tools in storage

                I don't know if this is still a valid product, but the company is still listed when I "Google" full name. It's a small industrial supply company (only 6 employees.

                In any case, the company I worked for (Ingersoll-Rand and Dresser-Rand) used to buy a product from them (and maybe still does) called SW-42 Metal Shield. It came in spray cans and we used it in the shipping department for coating all kinds of steel and iron parts before shipping. As you can imagine, the last thing you want to do is ship compressor valves, piston rods, and other exposed parts around the world and have them arrive rusty.

                This stuff is excellent for long-term storage too. One of the shop guys gave me a can when I put my RAS away for almost 15 years. I used it to spray the column, carriage, and rails. The saw sat in my damp basement for all that time, plus some. I dug the saw out last year, used some mineral spirits to clean the stuff off and the protection kept the parts like brand new.

                It sprays on, foams a small bit and then looks almost like brown coat of sticky oil. In a few hours, it forms a hard coat that won't run or wipe off. It doesn't crack or peel, even under the nasty conditions of my wet basement (or shipping). It's actually dry enough and hard enough that you can wipe dirt and accumulated debris off of it without damaging the coating.

                When it came time to remove it, I simply used mineral spirits and a couple of old rags and it came right off.

                Here's the info I found with the Google search. Apparently these folks don't have a web site, but it may be worth a phone call.

                Building Maintenance Corp (Bmc)
                1225 2nd St, Lake Charles, LA 70601-5465
                Contact Phone:(337) 439-3691 URL (web address):None
                Business Category:Whol Service Establishment Equipment in Lake Charles, LA
                Industry (SIC):Service Establishment Equipment and Supplies



                Again, the product name is SW-42 Metal Shield. The information on the can, provides the same address as above, but I should mention that I got this product significantly longer ago then what what the company established date is.

                I hope this helps,

                CWS

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                • #9
                  Re: Putting tools in storage

                  Boeshield T-9, CRC, LPS-2 or 3, are all good spray on metal protectants. Make sure you spray the undersides, all the threaded rods, etc AFTER you clean off the sawdust. If you can't find them at a local hardware, try a marine or boating store. Zip tie all the cords and loose stuff so it doesn't get cut or pinched when they cram all that stuff into the storage crates, and snug down the head on the miter saw with zip tie or bungee cords so it doesn't bounce.

                  You may want to buy a length of 6" PVC with end caps to store the TS rails in so they won't get bent or damaged. This works well for fishing rods, long levels, etc as well.

                  Good luck in Japan. I spent 3 years in Okinawa and found the people very friendly if you at least made an attempt to learn a bit of the language and customs.

                  Go
                  Practicing at practical wood working

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                  • #10
                    Re: Putting tools in storage

                    Thanks everyone

                    I hadn't thought about tearing down the saw, but when you mentioned it I cringed thinking about having to align everything again. Oh well.

                    I'm starting to learn some Japanese now, and I have access to a language learning center here at my current job so I'm hopefully going to be semi knowledgeable when I get there.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Putting tools in storage

                      I would suggest that you not wrap any tools in plastic because it tends to hold moisture from condensation which will make your tools rust.

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