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  • Re: Let's see some project pics!

    Nice job harrison. I have been thinking about making one of those.

    Here are some pics of my first real woodworking project that wasnt for the shop. These are made out of cypress and I am planning on plugging the screw holes. Also, havent decided if I want to put a sealer on them. I used cypress so I wouldnt have to but now I dont know if I want that aged looked or not. The one in the background was made from pine as a trail run as I am a novice and didnt want to waste any cypress. I made templates out of mdf for all curved parts and used a bandsaw for rough cutting and router with the mdf templates to clean up the edges. The seat slats, back slats, and arms were routed with roundover bit. I am glad I made templates as I have a feeling I will making more once the family sees them. One of these is for the wife and the other mine. The prototype has become my "shop" chair they are so comfortable.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Pez; 07-01-2008, 08:40 PM.

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    • Re: Let's see some project pics!

      I'm always amazed and inspired by the projects I see on this site. I cut my first piece of wood about a year ago, and learned everything I know (literally) on this forum, along with a bit of good old fashioned trial and error.

      This is my latest finished project, a small chair for my 2 year old. As usual, I just used scraps from around the shop, hence the hodgepodge of wood species (red oak, maple, ash, poplar, and padauk). If I ever win the lottery, maybe I'll be able to choose the wood by what would be best for the project rather than what I have on hand. But for now, I'm having a great time as long as I'm making sawdust!
      Attached Files

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      • Re: Let's see some project pics!

        I made the cabinet for my daughter so I gave her the prints, a hammer and punch and let her do the punching. The pattern came with the plans.
        Thank you all for your complements. Here is a work bench I made from plans from Fine Woodworking. It was the first large thing I made. I took this picture before the trim was added to the edges of the top along with a vise.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by harrison2119; 07-01-2008, 10:06 PM.

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        • Re: Let's see some project pics!

          Pez, I love those chairs. Seems like the back of the chair doesn't go down as low as most adirondaks. I'd think that's more comfortable, personally. They really look nice!

          Angus, that's a fine lookin little chair for scraps! I love how you banded the seat. Very nice work.

          Nice bench, Harrison. I saw that plan in FWW. Good to see it comes together as well as it does. Well done.
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

          Comment


          • Re: Let's see some project pics!

            Angus - that chair is AWESOME!. The different woods for the seat make that piece seem like it would cost a lot money to buy one.

            VASandy - you are correct. When I was searching different plans I wanted a chair that wasnt so low to the ground. I plan to have these for many years and when I am older getting up from a low chair could be difficult. And the supports for the back slats have a slight curve for added comfort.

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            • Re: Let's see some project pics!

              Pez those chairs are excellent. Where did you get the plans ? I have been looking at some but haven't seen these.

              Angus That little daughter chair is beautiful. You really do fine work.

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              • Re: Let's see some project pics!

                Harrison - sent you a PM.

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                • Re: Let's see some project pics!

                  zeno, that is a very beautiful table! i wanted to build one for your patio, but i've got a long list of projects to complete first. very nice table.

                  angus, that chair is very very nice! i should it to my kids and they though the strips of different wood was really nice. did you follow any plans for it? i'd like to get my hands on it, as i too want to make one for my kids one of these days.
                  ________________

                  omar

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                  • Re: Let's see some project pics!

                    well its been like four weeks since i finished this project but didnt get a chance to post some pictures.

                    i already have a patio that was build into the house. when i did backyard landscaping back in 2005, i couldn't decide what to use for the extended patio that i wanted to build away from the house. so we just put down 1/4" minus. this was the worst decision, because we trecked the dirt onto our patio and then into the house all the time.

                    so, i finally did the things that i should have done back when i did my backyard:

                    1. i resurfaced my existing patio with a resurfacing grout from hd and stamped a "roman slate" pattern into the resurfaced surface. we then applied a solid color concrete stain. we then applied a contrasting color semi-solid color stain on top of it to give it a faux look. the color looked real odd to us initially, but i think we may like it, who knows.
                    2. i also resurfaced + stamped the concrete pad outside the garage side door.
                    3. then i took the 1/4" minus out of the patio extension and made a walkway from the side gate to the backyard. there were just the 3/4" rock there.
                    4. i then bought the "coble stone" 16" x 16" x normal paver thickness tiles and installed them on a 3/4" to 1.5" bed of sand. i put the paver edger (black plastic edging) to keep the tiles from moving away at the grass area. put lock tite sand into the joints and the groves in the tile and wet it. after, it dried out, i sealed both the resurfaced concrete patio and the paver area with a sealer to protect the surface and to help keep the pavers in place.
                    5. lastly, i finally painted the patio corner shelves that i built very long time ago with the HF hvlp gun (the same one that rockler and woodcraft carries) and installed them into the patio.

                    full view of the patio, extended patio and patio shelves:
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                    another angle of the patio to get the real color:
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                    close up of the roman slate + finish of the resurfaced patio:
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                    close up of the patio stones:
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                    side walkway looking towards the to the side gate:
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                    ________________

                    omar

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                    • Re: Let's see some project pics!

                      side walkway looking towards the backyard:
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                      concrete pad at side door leading into the garage:
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                      thanks for looking!
                      ________________

                      omar

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                      • Sand Box

                        About three months ago I did a sand box for my kids. The box is made up of 2 pressure treated 2x8s and a two 5/4 deck railings. There is landscape fabric stapled in the bottom stapled to the box. The relatively wide railing (instead of just the top of a 2x8 that a lot of homemade ones have) is so that an adult can comfortably sit down with the kids.
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                        The lid is frame and panel made up of a pressure treated 2x4, ripped in half, and then cut to length. There is a groove that recieves a 1/4" piece of beaded plywood (it is thin so that the cover is light). The back side has a rabbet so that it will drop into the hole. There are two powder coated handles to lift it. Unfortunately there is a little more slop than I would like. The whole thing is painted with Colonial Red Painter's Touch paint.

                        The box was made with a Ryobi CMS and a cordless drill. The lid was made with a TS3650 (except for the miters which were done with the CMS) and a Senco 15 guage finish nailer.

                        Comment


                        • Adirondack Chairs

                          I just finished my second and third Adirondack chairs. I actually did most of them a month ago, but today I replaced the galvanized carriage bolts with stainless steel ones, so they were really only 100% complete today.

                          The one in the center is the original, the two outside ones are the new ones. The only difference in materials is that I used stainless steel nails in the new ones, and the old ones are hot dipped galvanized. The second and third chairs were made at the same time, with new tools that made them go much quicker than the original; and also turn out better in the end.

                          In order of bang for the buck:
                          1) $0.99 Workforce Spring Clamp - much easier to hold things for sanding or routing than a C-Clamp.
                          2) $24.50 MSUV - This made it much quicker and easier to cut the pieces to length, because I had a stop and proper outfeed support, and could cut everything to length without remeasuring (and even if I got it wrong, all the pieces that needed a particular length were cut at the same time).
                          3) $20 Ryobi 3"x18" Belt Sander - I made the chairs out of #3 Western Red Cedar that was surfaced on three sides. The fourth side was pretty rough, but even the good sides needed lots of sanding. This was much faster and easier on my hands than the ROS that I used for the first chair. Also, I it was really handy for edge sanding, because I could turn it upside down, rest it on the bench, and move the workpiece onto it.
                          4) $80 Ryobi 9" Bandsaw. Faster, safer, and more accurate than the jig saw that I used for the first chair.
                          5) $120 Senco Finish Nailer and Ridgid 2.5 Gallon Twin Stack Compressor. I liked being able to nail the slats in without needed a third hand. I liked even more that I didn't need to use a nail set to drive the nails just below the surface, so there was less opportunity to damage what I did.
                          6) $30 Extra Ryobi 18V drill - Not having to switch the drill settings between drilling/countersinking and screwing saved a bunch of time. It also saved time not having to change the screw driving bit for a twist bit. I want to get a combo drill bit/countersink for the next project involving lots of screwing so that I don't need to change the twist bit for a counter sink and vice versa; and I can do the hole and counter sink in one action.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • A few shelves in a walkin closet .. No Problemo!

                            My son recently bought a fixer upper and I was asked by my lovely wife and daughter in-law if I could hang a few shelves on a couple of
                            walls in one of the rooms that my daughter in-law was going to have as a walk-in closet. She called it her dream closet! and wanted it in the next room from their master bedroom.

                            My daughter in- law is a real sweet heart and really works hard holding down several jobs, so my answer was Nooo. Problemo!
                            Lets go on up and take some measurements. So I grab my tape measure, pencil and pad of paper, we jumped in the truck and went on up to my sons place to take some measurements. We preceded to the master bedroom to assess the project and layout a plan of action.
                            Well ..
                            the first little problem we came across was… there was no wall or door between the master bedroom and the next room! The previous owner was in process of tearing down the wall that separated the two rooms and all that was left of the wall was several studs that still remained in place where the old wall once existed.
                            I told my wife and daughter in-law it was a good thing the previous owner did not complete tearing down the wall because it was a bearing wall!! and the first order of business was to reconstruct the wall and doorway. Nooo. Problemo!

                            Well ... too make an already long story shorter…. A few months later I'm finally almost done putting up the few shelves.

                            What took so long you may be wondering? …..Well……
                            The few shelves ended up being 80+ adjustable shelves. Seven Wardrobes also outfitted with the option of more shelves if desired. A makeup desk nook, valet rods(s), and window seat. 96" High X 14" Deep including stand out from the walls and covers all four walls in a approx 14' x 16' room. Nooo. Problemo!

                            Here is a few initial construction pictures.
                            More pictures to come.
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Davet; 07-06-2008, 06:31 AM.

                            Comment


                            • Re: Let's see some project pics!

                              Davet, looks good to me so far, nice job!!!!
                              Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                              http://www.contractorspub.com

                              A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                              Comment


                              • Re: Adirondack Chairs

                                Originally posted by cpw View Post
                                In order of bang for the buck:
                                1) $0.99 Workforce Spring Clamp - much easier to hold things for sanding or routing than a C-Clamp.
                                2) $24.50 MSUV - This made it much quicker and easier to cut the pieces to length, because I had a stop and proper outfeed support, and could cut everything to length without remeasuring (and even if I got it wrong, all the pieces that needed a particular length were cut at the same time).
                                3) $20 Ryobi 3"x18" Belt Sander - I made the chairs out of #3 Western Red Cedar that was surfaced on three sides. The fourth side was pretty rough, but even the good sides needed lots of sanding. This was much faster and easier on my hands than the ROS that I used for the first chair. Also, I it was really handy for edge sanding, because I could turn it upside down, rest it on the bench, and move the workpiece onto it.
                                4) $80 Ryobi 9" Bandsaw. Faster, safer, and more accurate than the jig saw that I used for the first chair.
                                5) $120 Senco Finish Nailer and Ridgid 2.5 Gallon Twin Stack Compressor. I liked being able to nail the slats in without needed a third hand. I liked even more that I didn't need to use a nail set to drive the nails just below the surface, so there was less opportunity to damage what I did.
                                6) $30 Extra Ryobi 18V drill - Not having to switch the drill settings between drilling/countersinking and screwing saved a bunch of time. It also saved time not having to change the screw driving bit for a twist bit. I want to get a combo drill bit/countersink for the next project involving lots of screwing so that I don't need to change the twist bit for a counter sink and vice versa; and I can do the hole and counter sink in one action.
                                I totally agree as I did a lot of the same stuff for the chairs I just finished....

                                - spring clamps really helped me out for my chairs, much quicker and easier than any other type of clamp I had

                                - I dont have a cms but I did set up a jig on the table saw for all "same length" crosscuts

                                - I got a 14" bandsaw mostly for this project as I do not like using a jigsaw. I am using the bandsaw more than I thought (which is good) but sure made the chairs much more enjoyable to make.

                                - I bought a second cordless drill (and also right angle drill for some of the seat slats) so I wouldnt have to constantly change bits.

                                Excellent post cpw and I can confirm it will make building these chairs go smoother.

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