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  • 220 volts

    I giving a lot of consideration to buying a TS3660. Has anyone changed their saw over to 220. I would also be interested in everyones thoughts.
    oldtimer

  • #2
    Re: 220 volts

    can i ask what your reasoning is behind this would be change over?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 220 volts

      Seems like I read somewhere that by changing over to 220, the saw will use less than half the amps and will run more efficiently[less bogging down]. I don't know that I will switch but I'm interested in other opinions.

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      • #4
        Re: 220 volts

        Here's my 2 cents:

        The power developed in the saw will be the same, 120 or 220. Say 1800W. As you say, the current will drop to approx half. From an energy usage perspective, no difference. The relationship is P=IV which is linear, so as voltage goes up, current (I) goes down.

        There are however a couple of less obvious advantages I can see. There's not likely to be anything else on the 220V circuit, so it's not sharing it's input with other stuff drawing power and detracting from the power available to the saw if the going gets tough. Mine does bog, and trips the breaker because there's too much other stuff on the circuit. I'm presently redoing the electrics, so it will have 220V.

        At 220V, there is a greater magnetic field induced in the motor, which gets the thing going straight away. I have many 220V tools, most of which came from the UK. I run these off a 120-220V transformer, and I have never bogged either the circular saw or the CMS.

        That said, I haven't finished the electric work yet, so I can't comment on the results yet. I may never be able to, as I'm considering returning the 3660 in favor of a 4511, which will be 220 from the outset if I go that route. Jury still out on that one.

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        • #5
          Re: 220 volts

          Thanks for your opinion Roadster.

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          • #6
            Re: 220 volts

            I guess that was going to be my point oldtimer, the power will be the same... I just wouldnt have had so much indepth detail lol i have always been in the mind set of dont fix it if it isnt broke. I love my saw "'3650" i really have never had a problem going through the material.

            Oops i just realized i typed in all caps sorry about that...

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            • #7
              Re: 220 volts

              I appreciate your response Bondsman. I'm going to try for the 60 only because it is available. There doesn't appear to be much diff. between the 3650 & the 3660. As to the power, I'm going to run a seperate line for the saw and was curious as to the advantages of 220 volts. thanks again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 220 volts

                Roadster280 that's a very accurate description of 120v vs 220v. About the only downside I could see to wiring the saw for 220v would be if you ever plan to use your saw in another area in the house/shop or wheeling the saw outside to do some sawing where there is not access too 220 volts. Otherwise it's just the expense of installing a 220 volt circuit and changing the wiring/plug to the motor.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: 220 volts

                  one of the big advantages is. if you in a older place and the wiring is light duty, (meaning that it only has say a 30 amp box or so and there is a distance, and you have considerable voltage drop), by going to the 220 volt it only takes half of the amps and the voltage drop is less thus the lights dim less and it starts much easier as it is nearer full voltage,


                  6.5.1 Voltage in the Windings
                  When you have a motor which is able to be rewired for either 120 or 240 volts, you have a motor with split windings. The windings are either connected in parallel for 120 volt operation, or in series for 240 volt operation (see the diagram to the right). The net result, is that the individual windings never see more than 120 volts. If the voltage across the windings does not change, then neither does the power output. In short, the motor does not care how it is wired. Each winding still sees 120 volts from the source regardless of the configuration. The only thing that changes is the current in the wires within your house, but the power consumed remains the same.
                  http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Arti...lectricity.htm


                  I have most of my larger power tools on 220 volt, but at one time the lines to my wood shop were very antiquated and thus much voltage drop, by going 240 it helped a lot,

                  also once one starts to get horse powers greater than 1 to 1 1/2 you using enough amps 220 volts is a very logical choice,
                  Attached Files
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                  • #10
                    Re: 220 volts

                    I have a Craftsman radial arm saw which is 120/240 convertible. When I first got it I ran it on 120V and had lots of stalling problems, so I ran a 220 line to the garage and switched the saw over to 220. This solved all of the stalling/bogging down problems.

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                    • #11
                      Re: 220 volts

                      Switching to 220v may offer some advantages with lower voltage loss, but if you're 110v circuit is robust enough, you may not notice any improvement.

                      My thoughts are...

                      - If you have 220v easily available, there's no harm done and there might be some benefit on startup and recovery time when pushed hard.

                      - If you're experiencing slow startup, motor bogging, lights dimming and other signs of your 110v circuit being inadequate, then I'd switch to 220v.

                      - Seemingly minor things like good setup (belt tension, pulley alignment, blade to fence alignment), good blade selection, and keeping your blade clean and sharp can make a big difference to a saw's performance for very little money....those are always worth checking into before doing any electrical upgrades.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: 220 volts

                        Originally posted by drcurrier View Post
                        I have a Craftsman radial arm saw which is 120/240 convertible. When I first got it I ran it on 120V and had lots of stalling problems, so I ran a 220 line to the garage and switched the saw over to 220. This solved all of the stalling/bogging down problems.
                        You most likely would have solved the bogging down problems even if you had run a dedicated 120 volt line. The motor will start a bit faster with 240 volts tho. If the saw consumes 1800 Watts then your Wattage/Volts = Amps. 1800/240 = 7.5 amps. 1800/120 = 15 Amps. If we could get 3 Phase power at home we would have some real efficiency. Instead of 60 cycles per second you would get 180 cycles per second, like pedaling your bike with 6 legs instead of 2.

                        By the way, 110 and 220 went the way of the dodo bird. At least around here it's 120 - 240.

                        Buck
                        Last edited by BuckB; 01-26-2009, 11:21 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: 220 volts

                          So 220V doesn't improve the power or torque.
                          What are the advantages of the 3 phase motors?

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                          • #14
                            Re: 220 volts

                            Thanks again folks for the response and help. Sense I'm going to run a separate line, I'm leaning towards 220. I'm picking up the saw this morning and by the way the 3660 has been reduced to $399 as of yesterday.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: 220 volts

                              Originally posted by Handidad View Post
                              So 220V doesn't improve the power or torque.
                              What are the advantages of the 3 phase motors?
                              Because of the phases being off 120 degrees, there is no need for start windings or capacitors to shift the electricity to start the motor,

                              There reversible by switching any of two of the three leads,

                              Many times the power rate structure is cheaper for three phase which is usually considered industrial in use.

                              The electrical system is balanced.

                              I believe the the starting torque is greater,

                              you many times have smaller conductors to carry the same amount of power, and some times you step up to higher voltages so the wire size would be small for the same power carrying capacity of single phase,
                              Last edited by BHD; 01-28-2009, 10:53 AM.
                              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                              attributed to Samuel Johnson
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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