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Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

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  • Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

    http://www.mrsawdust.com/index.php

    Read the first chapter of Mr. Kunkels' book;

    http://www.mrsawdust.com/pdf/Sawdust_Chap1.pdf
    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

  • #2
    Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

    I enjoyed that
    thank you,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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    • #3
      Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

      Nice!

      I'll have to give some consideration to adding that to the library. I have another "DeWalt" RAS book, "Newest Ways to Expert Woodworking" by Robert Scharff. It is copyrighted by DeWalt in 1962 (when it was a Black and Decker company) and was published by Crown Publishers at that time.

      My 10" RAS is a 1974 Craftsman (made by Emerson Electric). I love that RAS!

      CWS

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      • #4
        Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

        Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
        Nice!

        I'll have to give some consideration to adding that to the library. I have another "DeWalt" RAS book, "Newest Ways to Expert Woodworking" by Robert Scharff. It is copyrighted by DeWalt in 1962 (when it was a Black and Decker company) and was published by Crown Publishers at that time.

        My 10" RAS is a 1974 Craftsman (made by Emerson Electric). I love that RAS!

        CWS
        Mine is an early 80's Craftsman, also made by Emerson. Just used it yesterday and as I did I was thinking that it would be possible but more difficult to make the cut I did on the TS or even the MS for that matter. I won't part with that RAS as long as it is still running and parts are available.

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        Last edited by Bob D.; 02-09-2009, 07:34 AM.
        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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        • #5
          Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

          Bob D....any tips on what to use as a substitute for the original wood table? mine, which i literally found on the street, works very well, but the table, having experienced several deeper than necessary cuts, is probably subpar. any tips or advice would be appreciated. my sears unit is somewhat older than yours. thanks.
          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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          • #6
            Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

            Finer,

            I had put my old 1974 Craftsman away several years ago. (You know, work just swallowed me up and I found myself with little time for anything else!)

            Well, I used whatever precautions I could at the time, bagging the motor carriage, protective coating on the column and other non-painted hardware, etc. I even removed the table and placed it up high, but after 18 years in a damp basement the chipboard table wasn't worth a thing.

            So, when I dug everything out in 2003 I found myself "table-less", so to speak. Got everything else cleaned up and in great working order though. I checked my parts list and ordered a new table from Sears... it arrived in about a week and a half.

            So, while many parts are no longer available for my Model 113-29461, the table top is! As I recall, it was around $60 plus shipping (not much, IIRC).

            I hope this helps,

            CWS

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            • #7
              Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

              Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
              Bob D....any tips on what to use as a substitute for the original wood table? mine, which i literally found on the street, works very well, but the table, having experienced several deeper than necessary cuts, is probably subpar. any tips or advice would be appreciated. my sears unit is somewhat older than yours. thanks.
              Is it part of the recall from a few years ago? You should check it out. When I went there and entered my model and serial number, I got a free new guard assembly AND a new top. My saw is like new now.

              http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com/
              "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
              John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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              • #8
                Re: Mr. Sawdust and the story of the DeWalt RAS

                Thanks, Mr. Kunkel, for putting this out there. I'm self-building a home, and I recently retrieved (from curbside) a 1950s DeWalt RAS. It doesn't work, and I want to do a continuity test on it to see if it's salvageable. But I can't get the cover off the motor! I took out the four long screws that run all the way from one side to the other, and I took off the blade. The motor cover(s) will turn, but not come off. Would you be willing to offer any tips on this?

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