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Time for a new blade

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  • Time for a new blade

    Well, I've certainly been getting a lot of use from the Ridgid 3660 I picked up at HD for $399 a couple of weeks ago. I built a 24" X 24" table to put a Zippo Lighter Display on (all hard maple). I also put together a work bench. This week, I've been making picture frames from basswood.

    I noticed yesterday towards the end of the day that I was getting tear out on my cuts. First off..the blade heigth was correct. Blade was sprayed Dri Cote before starting in the morning. All I can think is that the stock Ridgid 10" blade is already starting to dull.

    Any suggestions on a new blade? Freud Diablo 80 tooth? I've read a couple of good things about the new Ridgid 90 tooth blade. Since I mostly work with hardwood, both ripping and cutting, I'm open for suggestions!

    Thanks
    Bill

  • #2
    Re: Time for a new blade

    I really like freud blades.The only ridgid blade I have ever had was one that came in my cordless circular saw.It was a good blade and lasted a long time.Keeping the blade clean with pitch & gum remover sure keeps them sharp longer.Blades are expensive if its just dull have it sharpened.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Time for a new blade

      With all the hard wood (not just hardwood, but hard wood, aka hard maple,etc) you are cutting, console yourself to the fact that you need good quality blades (with good quality carbide and enough beef to be resharpened). I personally have had good results from Freud blades (industrial series), and with full kerf Delta, cutting walnut and oak, as well as quite a bit of softer woods like pine. The Freud Avanti series cut good for a while, but I have noticed some deterioration on the carbide, (pits and black streaks on the carbide) that I do not see on the 84/85 series industrial ones.

      I have not used the more expensive Rigid (note the absence of the "d"). Forrester, etc, so hopefully those that use those will chime in.

      As for tear out on the bass wood (very soft): are you using a ZCI (zero clearance insert)? If not, that may resolve that problem. I have never worked with basswood.

      Go
      Practicing at practical wood working

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      • #4
        Re: Time for a new blade

        Yes, I was using a ZCI. And that's part of what confused me a little. I was just not able to get a good clean cut no matter what. And when miter cutting to make picture frames, you can image the problems I had gluing them! I'm also not sure whether to go with a full-kerf or thin kerf.

        By the way, the basswood made beautiful frames. Just sanded them and used clear semi-gloss polyurethane.
        Bill

        Originally posted by Gofor View Post
        With all the hard wood (not just hardwood, but hard wood, aka hard maple,etc) you are cutting, console yourself to the fact that you need good quality blades (with good quality carbide and enough beef to be resharpened). I personally have had good results from Freud blades (industrial series), and with full kerf Delta, cutting walnut and oak, as well as quite a bit of softer woods like pine. The Freud Avanti series cut good for a while, but I have noticed some deterioration on the carbide, (pits and black streaks on the carbide) that I do not see on the 84/85 series industrial ones.

        I have not used the more expensive Rigid (note the absence of the "d"). Forrester, etc, so hopefully those that use those will chime in.

        As for tear out on the bass wood (very soft): are you using a ZCI (zero clearance insert)? If not, that may resolve that problem. I have never worked with basswood.

        Go

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Time for a new blade

          80-90 teeth blades aren't appropriate for ripping. If you're looking for one blade to do it all you might consider 40-50t blades. Dedicated ripping blades are usually in the 24t ballpark.

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          • #6
            Re: Time for a new blade

            Keep reading this thread as very shortly the gentleman from New York state, hewood, will drop in. He will edumacate youz on the many many choices you have when considering the replacement options for the POS Ridgid OEM blade.
            Last edited by BadgerDave; 02-19-2009, 08:45 PM.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              Re: Time for a new blade

              The original OEM blade on my CMS didn't last all that long, especially after muscling it's way through a few cases of laminate flooring. Once that job was completed, I needed a replacement blade right away to trim out the kitchen and my "local" choice was a Ridgid 50-tooth combination blade. I've been very pleased with it's cut quality and I've been using it for all my trim and baseboard work since

              (BTW, I'm NOT the "gentleman from New York" that BD is referring to!)

              I liked the blade so much, that I purchased another for my old Craftsman RAS. For the price and local availability it's doing a great job. The crosscuts are very smooth and after several months of use, I'm still pleased. However, I should point out that when it comes time to replace the blade on my table saw, I'll most likely put more consideration into taking the time to get a Freud blade. I have yet to have experience with one, but their reputation is terrific and for the money, I find it most often recommended.

              I completely agree with the comment regarding "ripping". You really need to give consideration to having an appropriate-toothed blade for whatever operation you attempt. From my experience a "high-toothed" blade will cause you some burning/binding problem if used for "ripping".

              I hope this helps,

              CWS

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              • #8
                Re: Time for a new blade

                I'm very happy with the Forrest WW2 it was just on sale went down to around $78.00 good luck

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Time for a new blade

                  I use a think kerf Ridge Carbide TS2000 40T blade for 95% of my TS works. The carbide on this thing is innn-sane. It makes beautiful cross-cuts and does a damn fine job ripping, even up to 8/4 maple, though it did bog down a bit. Following that experience, I got a 24T Forrest WW2 specifically for ripping thick hardwood.

                  The ripped edges have proven glue-up ready most of the time. Only with maple and cherry, which burns so easisly, did edges require any treatment.

                  http://www.woodpeck.com/ts2000blade.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Time for a new blade

                    Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
                    Keep reading this thread as very shortly the gentleman from New York state, hewood, will drop in. He will edumacate youz on the many many choices you have when considering the replacement options for the POS Ridgid OEM blade.
                    Sorry...didn't hear you at first Dave!

                    Which blade(s) to get really depend on what you cut, and what you're objective is. Assuming the blade is high quality (skip the cheapy junk), buying a separate specialty crosscut blade and a separate ripper will give better performance in each of their narrow operating regions respectively, but it'll mean buying two blades...each with little versatility, and changing them for each cutting task. None of the good general purpose/combo blades will crosscut as cleanly as a good crosscut blade, nor rip as efficiently as a good 24T ripper, but they will give very good glue ready results on a wide variety of materials without changing the blade due to their excellent versatility. A general purpose blade will also have the benefit of having cleaner rip cuts than a dedicated rip blade, though it'll be more prone to burning the wood and bogging your saw when ripping very thick material (1.5" +). You may just find that a good general blade is more than satisfactory for your needs, but it's subjective and YMMV.

                    Your saw will benefit from a good 3/32" thin kerk blade because it's takes considerably less material than a 1/8" full kerf (~ 25% less). For general purpose work, I've had excellent results with the Forrest WWII 30T and WWII 40T blade, Infinity 50T Combomax Lite, Infinity 010-060 60T, Ridge Carbide TS2000, Freud LU88R010 60T, and DeWalt DW7150PT. If you cut a lot of thick hardwoods, I'd lean toward the 30T WWII. If you need fine splinter free crosscuts in hardwoods, veneered ply, melamine, or laminated sheetgoods, I'd lean toward the Infinity 010-060....that's a very clean cutting blade that also happens to offer very good versatility and rips well to ~ 5/4". Getting both of those would give you an outstanding two blade set that compliment each other well. Both are versatile enough to be very good general purpose blades. Leaving either in the saw for most tasks would be fine, but both also have complimenting strengths at opposite ends of the cutting spectrum, giving you a very wide operating range with a high level of performance.

                    If you opt for a single 40-60T blade, consider eventually picking up a good 24T TK FTG ripper like the Freud LU87R010 or Infinity 010-124 for very thick hardwoods (2-3")...it'll spare the wear and tear on your main blade.
                    Last edited by hewood; 02-20-2009, 04:42 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Time for a new blade

                      Good post, hewood.

                      I'll second the comments on the Forrest blades. I also have good luck with Systimatic, especially after having Forrest sharpen them.

                      -Andy

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                      • #12
                        Re: Time for a new blade

                        Thank you all for all the information. I'm looking at either the Forrest WWII 40 tooth or the Infinity 010-060. One final question--full kerf or thin? I'm worried that a think kerf could cause real problems with the splitter on the 3660.
                        Bill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Time for a new blade

                          Originally posted by GaZippoman View Post
                          Thank you all for all the information. I'm looking at either the Forrest WWII 40 tooth or the Infinity 010-060. One final question--full kerf or thin? I'm worried that a think kerf could cause real problems with the splitter on the 3660.
                          Bill
                          The stock blade on your 3660 is a TK, and the splitter is just under 0.090", so either should work. Most manufacturers recommend a thin kerf with motors < 3hp. As long as you stay with blades of this caliber, you should have no issues with TK's on a saw as good as the 3660. The WWII TK is ~ 0.100" (full kerf is 0.125"), the Infinity 010-060 is 0.104" ...both should work fine with that splitter, but the thin kerf is significantly easier on your motor.

                          The Infinity has 50% more teeth than the 40T WWII and uses a 30° Hi-ATB which gives it a pretty hefty advantage for tearout free crosscuts, and smooth rips to about 5/4". The WWII has an efficiency advantage in thick rips to 1-3/4". I've run both blades quite a bit...for your described uses (especially frames), I think an 010-060 would be ideal....it's impressively clean cutting blade with good versatility.

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