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TP1300 cutting/feeding chatter

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  • TP1300 cutting/feeding chatter

    I just recently picked up a TP1300 and proceeded to run a few 8/4 cherry boards through it. On certain parts of the board the planer vibrates and bounces, scalloping the wood. Repeated passes simply reproduce the behavior in the same spot, probably because the feed rollers ride in the scallops and somehow transfer that imperfection to the cutterhead, or if the knives are having a problem with the material. The actual cutterhead is locked tightly and the knives are otherwise very sharp. A test scrap of 8/4 birch came out so smooth that it causes compulsive "rub-your-cheek-against-it" behavior, so the knives are in good shape. The cherry doesn't seem to be particularly hard, either. The machine is bolted down to a heavy, overbuilt cabinet I fabricated just for this purpose. Does anyone have any suggestions?

    P.S.: Dear Ridgid, my planer box said there were an extra set of knives in there, but I'll be darned if I can find them.

    Jared Emery

  • #2
    Does the grain reverse where the chatter is occurring? A lot of Cherry is fairly wild-grained, and what you are describing could well be tear-out.

    Dave

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    • #3
      I see what you're getting at, but the scallops are perfectly horizontal across the entire width of the board (along the same axis as the cutterhead). The wood is still being cut, not torn, just. Each scallop is about 1/8" wide, by the way. Jake, do I have a bad unit?

      Jared Emery

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      • #4
        Your problem is a bit perplexing. If it planes the birch without trouble and has problems on the cherry, I don't know if I can easily explain it. Have you tried any other species of wood? Also have you tried a shorter piece of cherry to see if you get the same result?

        Some more questions (that's about all I have right now). Are the chatters small waves or large dips in the wood (similar to snipe)? When planing and the chatters begin, does the board slow down or does it stay at the same speed?

        I don't believe you have a defective unit, otherwise you would see the problem much more consistently and across different species of stock. Some things you can do. First I would clean the rollers and the main table. Clean the rollers with lacquer thinner (don't put it on too heavy as it may soften the rollers too much) and make sure all dust and pitch are gone. After cleaning the main table wax it with a paste or automotive wax (as long as it doesn't contain silicon). Make some passes and see what that does. As a last resort try turning over the knives. I don't believe that's what it is but it may help.

        BTY the extra set of knives are under the outfeed table. If not call 1-800-4RIDGID for a set.

        Jake

        [ 07-17-2001: Message edited by: JSchnarre ]

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        • #5
          After a little experimentation, I could get the chatter to immediately stop by pulling up on the back end of the board as it was being fed....essentially I'm forcing the top surface of the wood into the cutterhead. After running the rest of the stock through, I found that it only happened on boards roughly 8' or longer, and only on the first 2 or 3 feet of the board. I can get around the problem for now, but would like to know more about why it happens. I'll learn more as I continue to use it. The test birch piece was only a few inches wide, by the way.

          Jared Emery

          P.S.: The extra knives were right where you said they'd be. Thanks Jake!

          P.P.S.: Note to engineers: the dust collection hood needs a few thumbscrews to attach its bottom to the dust port adequately. Installed per instructions, it leaks like a sieve.

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          • #6
            Jared, from your last post where you indicated that it "only happens on the first 2 or 3 ft" makes me wonder if your infeed table is set properly as described in the manual. Another thought is that you may need to provide some additional infeed support other than the TP1300 table.

            Sounds like once the board is about 1/2 way through (now it's evenly supported) that the problem goes away? With 8' boards I always use additional support on both infeed and outfeed. Works for me
            Dick

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            • #7
              Jared, on the dust collection hood, I drilled and tapped 3 10-32 holes along the bottom for some short brass screws to hold the lower section of the hood tightly against the body of the planer. Works like a charm. I agree, I shouldn't have had to do that!

              Travis

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              • #8
                1. The dust chute: Noted, I will pass that info on to the engineers.

                2. If you were getting the chatter in the first 2-3' (I an assuming an 8' long piece of stock), in was because the board was cantilevered on the cutterhead and putting upward pressure on it. A piece of cherry that size is heavy, so most likely the end of the board was putting upward pressure on the rollers, causing the knives to cut deeper and it may have been keeping the feed rollers from pulling the stock as well as they should. It sounds like you need a roller stand. Anything that heavy should have some infeed and outfeed support.

                Jake

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the help everyone!

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                  • #10
                    Have you got a dc system capable of pulling the exised material away from the board? I do not have a leakage problem with my unit. Been in commercial production for over a year without a hitch.
                    Curious!

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                    • #11
                      Yes, I have a Jet DC-1100 that's more than capable. It's simply a matter of a good seal between the plastic dust hood housing and the ejection port on the planer. After tightening the single screw on top, the dust hood pulls away from the port by as much as 1/8". If there were additional screws clamping it down at the bottom, the problem would be solved. For the time being I've duct-taped it closed, but I'm either going to apply some weatherstripping or tap some screws in there like the message stated above.

                      Jared

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