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Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

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  • Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

    Any decent sales or alternatives to the Freuds? I was thinking of picking up a ultra fine or fine crosscut blade and maybe a ripping one. I don't think I will do a ton of ripping...mostly 4' crosscuts in 3/4" ply, pine and maybe some thinner hardwoods...I don't plan on getting into 2" oak

    Also if anyone knows a good blade for my Ryobi BS900, I'd appreciate it...

    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

    Let me start by saying I am not qualified to answer this but will repeat what the guy at Rockler told me today and he almost had me sold until he muttered the words $109. He said it was no longer on sale but it shows to be on sale at the rockler site for 20% off.

    He was saying Forrest is a great blade but I would like to hear the Pro's thoughts from here.

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...filter=Forrest

    Paul

    PS. Is the blade that came with my TS3660 not a quality blade it has worked well so far but I have nothing to compare it to.

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    • #3
      Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

      Get a Forest Wood Worker II thin kerf 40 tooth blade, you won't reget it.

      The guys on here talked me in to it.

      Its the best all around blade I have ever used, it rips good and it really
      cross cuts great in oak or ply.

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      • #4
        Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

        I have a few saw blades including the Forrest WWII, and at least three Freud's, and a couple of Vermonts. If I am going to cut plywood I use the cheapest blade in my collection (you never know what you may hit); usually the Vermont, if I am going to combination cut hardwoods for finished furniture I prefer the WWII. However, I find the WWII is not a very good thick stock riping blade; so, when rip thick stock I will use my full kerf industrial Freud. It really depends on what you are cutting, I can't say I use one blade exclusively. However, I can say when cutting 5/4 and thinner stock I like the Freud, it is a good performer at a reasonable price. Not to mention if you drop it you are less likely to start crying.

        good luck and happy hunting.

        tgomez

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        • #5
          Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

          The Woodworker II is a fine blade, but I prefer the Freud Fusion. I use full kerf blades. Don't pay full price for either, they are on sale often.
          ken
          Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

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          • #6
            Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

            The stock blade on the 3660 is capable of cutting wood but is fairly poor compared to a good blade, and since that's where the saw meets the wood, a good blade makes or breaks the overall performance of a good saw.....so by all means, get a good blade or 3! No one blade will be best in all situations.

            A good general purpose blade like the Forrest WWII 40T, Ridge Carbide TS2000, Infinity Super General, Infinity Combomax, Freud Fusion, or Tenryu Gold Medal will all do a really good job in a lot of situations, but none will excel in the more extreme regions of fine crosscuts and thick ripping as well a good dedicated specialty crosscut blade or ripper. A general purpose blade is usually an easier and less expensive selection that doesn't need to be changed as frequently as separates, and the general purpose blade will leave a cleaner cut than a ripping blade (though slower with more strain on the saw), but ultimately your original thought to go with separates does have some inherent advantages. There are pros and cons to each philosophy.

            I've owned and tested nearly 50 blades at this point (blade comparison charts). If I were looking for blades for a new contractor saw or hybrid, my top choices would be somewhat of a blend of the above philosophies. Your saw will benefit from a good thin kerf blade when ripping thick stock.

            Option #1: Infinity 010-060 and Forrest WWII 30T TK. The 60T Hi-ATB Infinity for fine crosscuts, clean cutting general purpose use, clean rips to ~ 5/4", plywood, veneers, and sheetgoods, and a for thicker ripping and less critical general purpose use. You're going to get impressive results pretty much across the board with these two, and won't necessarily need to swap the blades out too often to get it. Each has good versatility in a broad range and cover nearly the full gamut of normal needs well, but each has it's own unique set of strengths that are a good compliment to the other's weaknesses. Cost can range from ~ $125 for the pair to upwards of $160 depending on sales.

            Option #2: Freud LU88R010 and Freud LU87R010 ripper. The LU88 has similar strengths as the above mentioned Infinity, but isn't as adept at fine crosscuts and ply work as the Infinity, but rips a bit more efficiently. The LU87 has similar strengths as the WWII 30T TK, is more efficient in very thick stock, but doesn't cut as cleanly or crosscut well. Price range is roughly $90-$100.

            Let the types of materials you cut and your preference on cut quality determine which you go with. You can even blend the LU88 and WWII 30T, or the 010-060 with the LU87 if you like. If cost is a big factor, I think either the 010-060 or the LU88 will be fine on their own for most of your needs...you can always add the complimenting ripper later.
            Last edited by hewood; 03-03-2009, 08:38 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

              That Infinity Blade (010-060) looks interesting for a one stop shop (which would really be ideal).

              What's the deal with thin kerfs though? I see quite a few comments like *but it's not a full kerf* when discussing blades like that. Is there a downside?

              Most of my cuts are cross 12" x 1" pine...some 2" pine. I haven't really ripped much (however, I didn't have a table saw of my own).

              If I did go with only one blade would that 40T WWII be a better choice?

              Also where is the best place to order these?
              Last edited by alkemyst; 03-03-2009, 10:50 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                Originally posted by alkemyst View Post
                That Infinity Blade (010-060) looks interesting for a one stop shop (which would really be ideal).

                What's the deal with thin kerfs though? I see quite a few comments like *but it's not a full kerf* when discussing blades like that. Is there a downside?

                Most of my cuts are cross 12" x 1" pine...some 2" pine. I haven't really ripped much (however, I didn't have a table saw of my own).

                If I did go with only one blade would that 40T WWII be a better choice?

                Also where is the best place to order these?
                The Infinity has 50% more teeth than the 40T WWII and has a Hi-ATB grind with a steeper top bevel angle that's cleaner cutting for fine crosscuts and plywood than the WWII 40T. The 010-060 also happens to have a kerf width of 0.104", which puts it at the thick side of thin kerf blades so it's as stable as any thin kerf blade going. It's also a bit less expensive than all but the best sale prices for the WWII. It's downside is that it won't rip as efficiently in materials much over 5/4"...maybe 6/4" depending. The WWII 40T really isn't going to rip efficiently in 2" material either, so a 24T to 30T ripper is best for that application anyway. The good news is that you can pick up a decent 24T FTG TK ripper for ~ $30 on sale when and if you need one. Both the Infinity and Forrest are top notch blades, but I do think the 010-060 is a better choice for crosscuts and plywood cutting. The Infinity is available directly from Infinitytools.com (on sale for $60). Amazon often has the best prices on the WWII, but Rockler, Woodcraft and others have sales too. Note that I'm a long time WWII user and fan, but I still think "Option 2" listed above will give better results overall than a single 40T WWII, and happens to cost about the same....the only benefit of the spending $100 on a WWII over the LU88 & LU87 is that you won't have to change the blade as often, but note that the WWII will dull faster than using two separate blades because it will simply see more use.

                There are legitimate arguments for both full kerf and thin kerf, pro and con. To some folks, it's simply a matter of the math being simpler with a 1/8" blade than a 3/32" blade. It can also be a matter of what was available on sale at the time of purchase. Even though the width differences appear minute, a full kerf blade is typically 33% thicker than it's TK counterpart. A wider kerf blade makes a wider cut, thus taking more wood and requiring more power to make the cut at the same speed…a similar principle to a lawn mower's width of cut. There will also be a proportionately higher amount of sawdust with a full kerf blade, more wood consumed in the process, and even somewhat higher noise levels from increased wind noise (though minor). Wood savings is also a consideration, though a minor one for many hobbyists. That consideration may become more significant if you handle a lot of expensive wood. You're likely to encounter situations where a full kerf blade bogs a smaller saw more often than a TK would, most notably in thicker materials. Slowing down the feed rate can help compensate somewhat for the additional power requirements, but slower cutting means more tendency to burn the wood, and less ability to cut efficiently in thick materials.

                Full kerf blades tend to be more stable than their TK counterparts due to the increased steel thickness… not much argument about the logic of the physics involved, but that's not to say that most TK's are unstable….they're not. There's a fair amount of sentiment about the stability difference between the kerf widths that I believe stems from earlier versions and poor examples of thin kerf blades, or possibly using them in situations where a full kerf blade would have clearly been a better choice. Modern alloys are vastly stronger than those from even a few years ago, and modern blade design technology has improved in leaps and bounds. Modern designs, computerized equipment, and laser cut slots combine to offer some extremely good thin kerf blades that will rival the cut quality and performance of the best full kerf blades in a home-shop type setting. While it's true that TK blades in general are more prone to flexing than full kerf blades, that doesn't mean that they're likely to encounter those issues. After years of use and testing some 30+ TK blades on a fair number of different saws, I have yet to encounter a severe deflection or vibration issue with a TK blade during a cut that was caused by the blade. A saw with acceptable arbor runout and vibration levels should be able to spin a TK blade with similar precision as a full kerf blade. Issues with TK blades are most likely to occur if a problem already exists within the saw, such as high levels of runout, in which case the TK blade will indeed amplify that problem. Wood that deviates badly from flat and straight, or thick wood with very stiff grain patterns, such as mesquite, are also more likely to cause some blade flexing, but I'll reiturate that more likely doesn't equate to likely. For most common hobby uses, a good TK blade is more than adequate, and offer some significant advantages in reduced motor strain. Commercial environments and high volume hobby environments pose a different set of challenges such as complications from large quantities, heat, and power feeders, etc. Commercial saws are almost always equipped with ample motors to spin a full kerf blade without strain are and suggested for those applications.

                Now that I own a 3hp cabinet saw, there's less incentive for me to buy thin kerf blades, but when I was primarily using 1-1/2 to 2hp contractor or hybrid saws, the TK's were a very welcome commodity. With a good 24 tooth TK ripper there was nothing my smaller saws couldn't handle with relative ease, including 12/4" hard maple, QSWO, and elm. While the same saws would cut the same wood with a good 24 tooth full kerf blade, the difference in motor strain, bogging, and feed rate was noticeable. The lower feed pressure is analogous to waxing your saw's table top to reduce friction. It's not just about cutting speed, it's about ease of feeding and increased control, which is actually safer. With flat straight stock, cut quality was roughly equivalent between a high quality TK blade and a comparable high quality full kerf blade. It's difficult to discern the differences in cut quality in a reasonably controlled setting. A good TK blade won't tax a smaller motor as much as a wider blade will, especially in thick materials, and can extend the life of the motor. Ultimately the decision is yours to make, and should take into account what you cut most and what saw you have.
                Last edited by hewood; 03-03-2009, 11:34 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                  Thanks! Just ordered that Infinity 60T.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                    I think you'll be really pleased with your choice. If you need a decent inexpensive ripper to compliment the Infinity, the DeWalt DW7124PT is on sale for $22. Infinity, Freud, and CMT also make good rippers for ~ $35 to $50.

                    Good luck and be safe!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                      Originally posted by hewood View Post
                      I think you'll be really pleased with your choice. If you need a decent inexpensive ripper to compliment the Infinity, the DeWalt DW7124PT is on sale for $22. Infinity, Freud, and CMT also make good rippers for ~ $35 to $50.

                      Good luck and be safe!
                      I have some cheaper 10" blades for my compound miter that would work for ripping duty if needed

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                      • #12
                        Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                        im also not qualified to offer any real advice but i have taken note of everyone advice here and have decided to look into purchasing me a blade i want to do a little bit more research and look through the board before i spend any money though

                        i have one that i really want to get and i think that this information provided is invaulable its so hard to decide whats a good blade lol

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                        • #13
                          Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                          You will find as many different opinion on blades as you will brands of blades for sale.

                          If you are doing furniture grade work, or panel glue-ups that come straight from the saw (this is saying you don't use hand planes. etc to fine tune the edge), you will want a minimum 60 tooth blade for the final joint. 80 tooth will give a smoother cut but will be slower feed. If you use it to edge joint boards for panel glue-up, it will dull quicker, so buying a full kerf one with heavy carbide teeth gives you the option od sharpoening several times as opposed to buying a new blade. If a good sharpening service isn't available, or you don't like the idea of speniding the time for them being sharpened, go with thin kerf.

                          A 50 tooth "combination" blade is a good choice for general purpose. It does a good job both ripping and crosscutting, but does not do an excellent job at either. Again, full tooth heavy carbide will last longer provided you have a reasonable sharpening service available. If ripping heavy (2"+ thick) lumber, a full kerf is much less likely to warp out following the grain of course or wet woods.

                          What do I use? I have had good luck with the thin kerf Freud 300 series (Avanti) blades both at 60 tooth and 50 combination. They are lower cost and available to me locally (Lowe's, no HD withing an hour's drive), but I consider then "throw-aways" as the teeth will pit and not a lot of carbide for resharpening. My work horse blade is a 50 tooth full kerf Freud (LU84R011) that gets the job done, but is a little rough for fine joints. As I often use hand planes, that is not a problem. I also picked up a 60 tooth Delta full kerf on sale when Lowe's was clearing their stock, and it has performed excellently for glue ready cuts, both ripping and cross-cut, in hard woods up to 2" thick.

                          Have not tried Infinity, Ridge, Forrester as I have never seen the need to spend that much.

                          Go
                          Practicing at practical wood working

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                          • #14
                            Re: Just picked up a TS3660...what's a decent blade(s) to go with right now?

                            WWII is $93.75 shipped at amazon right now.
                            http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000223VQ/

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