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  • TS3612

    Thanks for all the help on the Miter saw subject about 2 weeks ago...I bout the MS1060 .works great.Just could'nt justify the 12" though with the wife that is...Myself thats a different story..Thanks again though.


    I am going to buy the TS3612 in about 2 weeks though, Could yall please give me a heads up on what to buy along with it to make set up easier. I have alot of the basic tools (wrenches, nut drivers,screwdrivers C-clamps) stuff like that. But is there any off the wall stuff to make it go any smoother or just plain help the process. Any imput would be apreciated... Thanks

  • #2
    Add a framing square, and something to give you a good 45 degree like a combination square. Allow plenty of time, but the process is straightforward.

    You have the choice of power switch on left or right. Be sure to choose the right (safety issue if installed on the left)

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    • #3
      I downloaded the manual from the Ridgid site and printed out the pages relevant to assembly a few days before I bought my saw. I used that time to get familiar with the assembly process. Worth doing in my opinion.
      Alan
      My Shop

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      • #4
        Charlie,

        How come I should install the switch on the right? I just finished assembling mine and I'm curious as to why?

        Michael

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        • #5
          What could be the safety issue on the left mount switch? I mounted mine on the left so I could better access it. On the right the fence can get in the way of the switch during certain cuts...out on the left where I have it that's not possible.
          Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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          • #6
            , I agree completely, Kellyc
            Buy American....if you can

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            • #7
              I too am in agreement with Kelly.

              Michael

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              • #8
                I too concur with Kelly.

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                • #9
                  I talked to Charlie P a month ago about the TS3612, and he mentioned the switch. The issue he had with mounting the switch on the left is that the little tie-wrap thingy that holds the power cord in place (on its way from the switch to the motor) can break or pop open. That leaves the power cord dangling right next to the drivebelt.

                  When mounted on the right, the power cord doesn't go near the belt, so it's safer in that way.

                  With the blade set at 45 degrees, there can be some tension on the cord (depending on how much slack you have given it - I didn't have enough slack initially). I added a couple of sturdy tie-wraps to assure the cord couldn't come loose and wander into the belt, and to act as a strain-relief on the cord as it enters the motor. I get Charlie's approval on the safety issue he's referring to, plus the advantages of a left-mounted switch that Kelly C referred to.

                  (Charlie can respond with his experience and/or clarifications.)

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                  • #10
                    Left Side
                    <a href=\"http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx\" target=\"_blank\">http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx</a>

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                    • #11
                      I talked to Charlie P a month ago about the TS3612, and he mentioned the switch. The issue he had with mounting the switch on the left is that the little tie-wrap thingy that holds the power cord in place (on its way from the switch to the motor) can break or pop open. That leaves the power cord dangling right next to the drivebelt.

                      Easy to get around....leave the cord a lot of slack when it passes under the motor and belt....also, the drive belt has a cover which prevents any tangling from any outside source...no doubt designed for the cord to pass for left side mounting...."no danger Will Robinson"....(I also don't think those cord wrap ties can just split open...I've had some under the hood of my SS for years that are still holding... [img]smile.gif[/img] ).
                      Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for all the help guys. I appreciate it. I am sure it will come in handy..

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                        • #13
                          Sorry for the slow response - I was on a business trip - and thanks to those who explained my concern.

                          When I moved the saw one day to allow clearance for a large piece of wood, the cord pulled out of the tie, and rubbed against the belt until the insulation was gone. Not a theory about what could happen, but bare copper wires showing. So I have had surgery on the power cord, and installed one of the old-fashioned heavy-duty bolt-on cable holders in the last tie-down position.

                          With any new tool I have to get used to where the switch and other controls are located. I could have learned to use the switch on the right rather than the left, so that seemed like the simplest solution for someone just starting to use this machine.

                          I have shared my concern privately with Jake, suggesting that a stronger attachment device be included in the future. This is such an easily solved problem (switch in the other position or stronger attachment) that I would hate to have it turn anyone away from a great saw.

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                          • #14
                            I mounted my switch on the left. You can run the cord around the right side and over to the left. The saw comes with three wire ties, and you will use two on the right side and one on the front left side. This will keep the cord tight up against the under side of the table all the way around to the left side. In this position, I can shut-off the saw by a bump from my leg or shut it off with my hand, and I never need to cross the path of the blade.

                            During assembly, I would add a clamp just to the side of each bolt hole for the wings. Make sure you don't block yourself from being able to tighten the bolts. Also, just take your time with alignment of the rails and the wings and you should wind up with a saw that performs well and needs little if any adjustment to the fence or blade.

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                            • #15
                              Guess I have to swim upstream again Mount the switch in the right!

                              Granted, I may do things backwards, being a lefty, but the reasons make sense. I have an older Craftsman. When I added a Biesemeyer fence, the switch ended up below the rail, to the right of the saw case. The switch points down about 60 degrees off the vertical---makes it real easy to shut it off with your knee, if needed.

                              Thing is, with the fence, to the right of the blade, and if you're standing to one side, like you should to avoid kick-back, you end up on the right side of the saw, so it helps to be near the switch. Since I'm more likely to want to kill the motor, when ripping, the right mount makes sense to me. Just another way of looking at things.
                              Dave

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