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  • Bowing wood

    Hi All, I'm trying to build a tool cabinet made out of 1 x 8 pine. I bought a 1 x 8 x 8' board that looked pretty straight. By the time I got around to building the cabinet, about 3 days, the wood had bowed and curled up (width wise). The board can no longer be used.

    What can I do to prevent this? Should I have immediately cut it to length? Does all wood do this?

    Thanks for any help.

    Mike

  • #2
    If you had immediately cut it, you would now have smaller cupped and otherwise warped pieces.

    It is not an easy task to buy Pine that is suitable for furniture building. The stuff (being kind there) sold at the home improvement centers is not fully dried, at least not around here.

    It is possible that you contributed to the damage by improper storage. The first thing you can do to warp damage stock is store it with airflow restricted, to only one part of the board. As example, laying flat on a workbench. This allows moisture gain or loss on one side, but not the other. It is moisture gain and loss that changes the size of wood.

    An even bigger mistake is made by laying flat on concrete.

    Dave

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    • #3
      GUILTY AS CHARGED!

      That is exactly what I did. Laid it on my workbench.

      This lumber was purchased by a very reputable yard.

      How should I lay the boards?

      Mike

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      • #4
        I think the best way is on stickers. Stickers are small pieces sitting crosswise to the board, so that it is elevated.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Dave Arbuckle,
          Would you say that I might loose maybe the top and bottom board in this stacking situation shown in the picture below? Would it be best if I stored the stack on stickers??? I really only have room for one stack as you can see... I have run into the warped board situation many times... I usually buy 50 to 100 boards at a time for my projects…



          [ 03-20-2003, 07:46 PM: Message edited by: Big Johnson ]
          Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

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          • #6
            Big, I would be a little concerned for the top board, and very concerned for the bottom.

            If there's a way to get the bottom board up off the concrete, or to use a board that you already don't care about, that would be better. Draping a sheet over the whole stack, surprisingly, helps a lot. A tarp would be really good on the warping front, but would encourage mold growth which is worse.

            I don't ever like to deadstack (stack without stickers) like that, but you have to accomodate your space. Do you have any wall space you could make some lumber "shelves" for? That much wood could easily be accomodated on a piece of wall as wide as the lumber is long. Probably four or five times that much wood.

            Dave

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