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How much curve in TS3612 Table top is acceptable?

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  • How much curve in TS3612 Table top is acceptable?

    Today I started putting together my TS3612. To my suprise, I find that the table top is not perfectly flat. The curve was noticable to my eyes when I flipped it on it's legs. How much is acceptable, if any at all? Should I take this saw back to HD? Sorry to keep asking so many questions, but this is my 1st table saw and the cost was triple what I had originally planned to spend (Knowing nothing about woodworking, I had thought a table saw was a table saw).

    TIA - Dae

  • #2
    Dae, you need to measure it. There are places on a tablesaw top that look out of flat even though they aren't, as an optical illusion.

    I assume you don't happen to have a certified straightedge around (because if you did, you would have used it). If you have a level or like item, you can see if it is reasonably straight by laying it on the tablesaw top, noting where it does and doesn't touch, turning it around the other direction and seeing if the places change. Where they change, the level is out of flat, where they don't, the top is out of flat.

    For what it's worth, a tablesaw top really doesn't need to be particularly flat. Convex is fine, depending a little on where the convexity is. Concave is more of a problem. A common place for a contractor's saw to be out of flat is right at the thin part behind the blade insert, and it doesn't make a huge difference.

    Nonetheless, try getting a handle on where and how much the top is out of flat and posting it. I'm certain Ridgid has reasonable standards and if it is out, will take care of it.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Dae,

      I'd get a hold of a staight edge and a feeler gauge and take some measurements. Also cut on the saw. If the saw cuts good, then whats the problem?

      Jake

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      • #4
        Jake,

        The reason I want to know what Ridgid considers acceptable is because it would take me no time at all to take it apart and get it back to HD. I also have another problem. That problem is that the zero clearance insert sticks up just a tad on the front. I tried adjusting the screw to get it down but then it raises the back of the insert. I'm not sure if this is normal or not. BTW, even if the saw made clean cuts has no effect on how I feel about getting a product that does not meet spec. It's as if your telling me that if I bought a new car with a paint scratch, it's fine because it still runs fine.

        - Dae

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        • #5
          I'm somewhere between surprised and appalled at Dave's and Jake's responses to Dai's problem. Your comments are usually helpful, and such responsiveness on this forum certainly helped with my decision to take home a 3612.

          But now Dai says his table is visibly warped, and Dave says it is an optical illusion, and the table doesn't need to be flat anyway. Seems to me, flat and square is what a table saw is all about.

          And Jake says, "if it cuts good whats the problem?" Dai admits this is his first table saw, so on what basis could he determine whether it was working correctly or perhaps unsafely? Seems to me if the table looks warped, and may be preventing the insert from seating correctly Rigid would be happy to help Dai solve the problem.
          Tony<br /><a href=\"http://www.mindling.com/passages\" target=\"_blank\">www.mindling.com/passages</a>

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          • #6
            Dai --

            Did you cut the slot in the zero clearance insert per the manual? If not, I think it will rock on the blade, even when it is lowered all the way.
            Tony<br /><a href=\"http://www.mindling.com/passages\" target=\"_blank\">www.mindling.com/passages</a>

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            • #7
              To be more specific, Dave said Dae, you need to measure it.

              Many apologies to any who think I'm being unhelpful, but "it looks warped" ain't good enough. Please do try to understand what I wrote before you slam me for it. If nothing else, it is the absolute truth.

              Dave

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              • #8
                I also have another problem. That problem is that the zero clearance insert sticks up just a tad on the front. I tried adjusting the screw to get it down but then it raises the back of the insert. I'm not sure if this is normal or not.
                Yes, it will rock until you cut the slot. See my previous post.

                http://www.ridgid.com/cgi-bin/ultima...c;f=6;t=000090

                Rick
                <a href=\"http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx\" target=\"_blank\">http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx</a>

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                • #9
                  The table is curved on the left side, while straight on the right. This was checked with multiple straight edges. Now I just have to get my feeler gauge back to measure. What I really need to know is how much curve is allowed for the top to be in the accepable range. As it was pointed out by Tony, I can not say how acceptable a cut is since this is my 1st table saw. I also have not yet cut out the insert because I am not sure if I will keep this table because of the table top. This cut out may fix the flatness issue with the insert, but I do not think it will. The insert is not too much of an issue because I can always grind it down but the table top is. Please, can anyone tell me how much curve Ridgid considers acceptable in the table top? If none at all, I will be taking this back.

                  TIA - Dae

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                  • #10
                    Almost forgot, the straight edge shows that the gap is about the depth of a thickness of a CD, only of the left side of the table. Not sure what the actual measurement is, but that should give anyone a rough idea.

                    - Dae

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                    • #11
                      IMHO..... Take it back!
                      <a href=\"http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx\" target=\"_blank\">http://photos.yahoo.com/rixworx</a>

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                      • #12
                        I say take it back as well...sounds like too many faults to give you a good cut. My 2424 was checked and found to be flat as a pancake. All adjustments were right on the money out of the box. Like the old new-car theory went, you might have a "Friday or Monday" made saw!
                        Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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                        • #13
                          I'm not getting a feel for which way it is out of flat (front to rear, side to side, outboard the miter slot, etc.) Since it bugs you, take it back. The Home Depot staff doesn't know anything more about the flatness tolerances than you do.

                          Those who are suggesting the zero clearance doesn't fit because the slot is not cut... Remove the blade and test the fit. That is a place where it really does need to be right.

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Dae,

                            You have mail.

                            All,

                            I apologize if I offended anyone with my comment about cutting on the saw. On a regular basis I receive calls from customers stating my saw is .002" out of parallel or its our of square by the Nth degree, when in reality the saw cuts beautifully and the customer is asking the unit to be much more precise then a finished wood product possibly can be. In the end the ultimate measure of a woodworking tool is how well it does its designed job, in this case ripping and cross cutting. I am sorry if any one took it the wrong way and looking back I may have worded it wrong, but I don't believe I was asking a customer to accept an inferior product. What I was trying to do is help Dae determine whether he received a good functional saw or not.

                            Once again, my apologies for the poor wording of my response,

                            Jake

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                            • #15
                              Dave & Jake:
                              If you are saying Ridgid Table saws do not need to be flat I need to start looking at another brand. I was about to buy one.

                              SCWood

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