Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Dressing lumber Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dressing lumber

    Hi,
    I've gotten a number of cherry slabs recently and am finding sources for rough lumber. After drying and resawing I need to dress the wood for use. Been studying the issue and the basic formula involves using a jointer to get a flat side and a 90deg. edge. Then, use planer/thicknesser to flatten other side to thickness, etc. The problem is everybody recommends a jointer bigger than six inches. I would definately need this. But the price rises rapidly as well as the space needs. So I've been looking for alternatives. The ones I've found are:

    1) old-fashioned hand planes going to try this route, for the experience and somebody's giving me a Stanley 607c to help get me started, but I doubt I'll want to use this as my main long term method

    2) router jig, I'll try it

    3) seen a couple of jigs people make to use a planer as a jointer. For reasons I don't understand a 12" planer is much cheaper than a jointer. Since I need a planer anyway I'll probably try this too.

    What am I missing? Suggestions.

  • #2
    Re: Dressing lumber

    Other than tracking down an old wide bed jointer and the time and cost of refurbishing it the benchtop planer with sled is probably your best bet for handling 12" stock.

    Maybe go for a wider planer like a 16 or 20"?
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
    ---------
    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Dressing lumber

      the Idea is that a thickness planer will not really straighten out a board if it is twisted or not flat, and will just cut to thickness and depending on the the defect will pass it along,

      the more bed and longer the bed on the thickenss planer will reduce the defect twists, bows, ect) but not necessary remove it if a thickness planer is used with out jointing.

      now that said, if the lumber is good and straight with only minor imperfections (roughness or some waves or so), it will probably plane it down to good quality with out using a jointer to start out with,

      just plane off an equal amount from both sides, (keep flipping the board so the surfaces are equally removed,

      (a punt way with out a jointer)
      now since most of the planers on the market can do a fairly thick piece of lumber to day,
      another of getting a good flat surface is to use a "sled" find a good heavy straight board that will not deflect and as long if not longer than the board to be flattened, and then put the one to be planed on top of that if necessary lightly fasten from under (or use stops, fastened to the sled) and wedge if any corners are up, so it sets solid, and then flatten one surface using the planer, remove from sled, and finish planing it to thickness. then use the jointer and edge off one side if needed, trim on the table saw and edge the other side,

      here are some web sites that have some ideas on the sled idea,
      http://modernwoodshop.com/2008/06/18...a-planer-sled/

      http://lumberjocks.com/John8059/blog/7131

      here is a page on using a router and sled
      http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1992
      good picture below,
      http://media.photobucket.com/image/s...ter-Planer.jpg
      Last edited by BHD; 03-30-2009, 10:38 AM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Dressing lumber

        a jointer is not designed to make lumber a thickness, it is designed to remove a defect of twist, cup, bow, etc,


        a jointer is not a planer,
        a planer is not a jointer,

        even if they have a similar type of head,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Dressing lumber

          here is a very good video showing a planar sled good luck...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Dressing lumber

            Yeah, that was the first one I saw that explained using a sled with a planer. Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Dressing lumber

              It works, I've done it more than once (using a planer to joint the face of a board), but it is not the preferred method.

              What was asked was (I believe) would it work for a particular need, in this case some cherry stock >6", not as a permanent replacement for a jointer.

              I have a 6" jointer and wish I had an 8 or 12, but since I don't when I run across the occasional instance when I need to face a wide board I use a sled I made for use with my 13" planer. It takes more time to set it up right but once you develop the technique and have some good shims it's not that bad.

              If this method will get you through your immediate need and you understand the limitations of using a planer in this manner then get the planer first and follow it up with a jointer when you can. Otherwise find someone who can face the boards for you for the near term (even if you have to pay a few bucks to do it), and save up for a jointer that will suit your needs. Don't buy for the occasional 10 or 12" board, but get a size that will accommodate 80 to 90% or your needs for jointing, it all depends on how much cash you have to put into the tool. This is all assuming you are in this as a hobby. If you are in WWing for a profit then everything changes.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment

              Working...
              X