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compound trim

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  • compound trim

    the center photo in the following is a stair rail a friend and i did:
    http://community.webshots.com/album/570901407xtoYkd
    the question concerns the lower newel post in the center photo. the owner wants to encircle the newel post with trim that will fill any gaps where the newel protrudes from the angled 1x which slants at the same 40deg angle as the stairs. any ideas on determining the requisite angles would be appreciated. thanks
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

  • #2
    Re: compound trim

    Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
    the center photo in the following is a stair rail a friend and i did:
    http://community.webshots.com/album/570901407xtoYkd
    the question concerns the lower newel post in the center photo. the owner wants to encircle the newel post with trim that will fill any gaps where the newel protrudes from the angled 1x which slants at the same 40deg angle as the stairs. any ideas on determining the requisite angles would be appreciated. thanks
    It depends somewhat on what kind (shape) of molding being used... flat moldings are easier but it can be done with quarter round etc.

    (Dual Bevel Compound Miter Saw) For the sides, bevel 40° , miter 45° with flat (back) against the fence...

    First set bevel 40° to the right (or left, depends which side you're doing first) for right hand side (standing at bottom looking up) and miter set 45° to the right. Piece to the left with back against the fence... this will give you the top cut on right hand side piece. Next swing the miter 45° left and leave the bevel set at 40° right. This time the piece goes to the right of the blade with back against the fence...

    Reverse procedure for left hand side piece... ie: bevel set left at 40° and miter set left at 45°, work piece to the right of the blade for top left hand side miter cut... Next swing miter 45° right (leaving bevel at 40° left) and position work piece to the left of the blade with flat back against the fence...

    That gives you the 2 sides, next you need the top...

    Set the bevel at 90° and miter both ends at the appropriate 45° with the flat back against the fence... Next you'll need to rip that piece on the table saw with the flat against the table and the blade tilted to 40°... It depends whether your saw is left tilt or right tilt... If it's left tilt the you'll need to move your fence to the left of the blade and set the distance to the same length as the height of the flat back of the molding... you need to rip a 40° bevel on the bottom edge of the work piece so that the back stays the same hieght and the waste is removed from the front bottom finished side... make sense?

    The sides are easy, the top is fairly easy, it's the bottom that makes things tricky... Just as the top piece is made smaller by beveling the bottom finished face the bottom piece needs to start out bigger because in effect you have to add 40° to the bottom finished face edge... you'll need to start out with a wider piece of molding. The ends are just simple miters again but you need to add 40° to the bottom edge with the flat back staying the same height as all the other pieces... On a left tilt table saw position your fence to the left and set the distance to the fence the same as the height of the flat back of the molding (in both rip procedures keep the top finished edge against the fence and the flat back down on the table.

    Tip: If you can't make a piece of molding wider (height of flat back) then you could make the other 3 pieces a bit narrower by ripping a 1/4" or so off the bottom edges before starting the miter and bevel cuts... this should give you the wider piece needed for the bottom side of the newel post.

    You should experiment with some scrap and do a mock up first...

    Good luck, HTH - Jim

    edit: you may want to rip longer pieces of molding (due to safety) before mitering for top and bottom pieces, just make sure the flat back goes against the fence when mitering...
    Last edited by jbergstrom; 04-11-2009, 03:59 AM.
    Cheers! - Jim
    -------------
    All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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    • #3
      Re: compound trim

      Personal opinion here. I think trimming the base of the newel post would take away from the clean lines of the work you've done. Since the 1 X is painted, why couldn't you fill the gaps with wood filler and touch up the paint? Seems to me that whatever you use to trim it out with will look like it's being used to hide a gap.

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      • #4
        Re: compound trim

        Originally posted by killavolt View Post
        Personal opinion here. I think trimming the base of the newel post would take away from the clean lines of the work you've done. Since the 1 X is painted, why couldn't you fill the gaps with wood filler and touch up the paint? Seems to me that whatever you use to trim it out with will look like it's being used to hide a gap.
        100% agree

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        • #5
          Re: compound trim

          kilavolt & rofl....while i agree with both of you in principle, ultimately, it's the owner's decision. and the gap is j-u-s-t too large for any kind of filler. the same application needs to be applied where the 40 deg 1x meets the partial wall in the leftmost portion of the center photo.
          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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          • #6
            Re: compound trim

            If I HAD to do some trim on those I would still try to go minimal. 1/8" or 3/16" flat stock about 3/4" or 1" wide. It would be pretty easy to figure out angles and do small modifications with a belt sander. Knowing that it will be painted, I would even try to get away with butt joints instead of miters. If it is properly prepared you wouldn't be able to tell the difference once paint is applied.

            It's also possible that I am misinterpreting what you are trying to do.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: compound trim

              Personally I would go bigger and not smaller. Make a collar to surround the post base using 1/2" birch ply cutting the base of the ply to fit the 40deg base and leaving the top square to the post. Then cap the collar off with 1/2" scotia or cove moulding. To make everything consistent you could then collar the rest of the newels to make it look natural instead of it looking like a patch. IMO



              Bill

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