Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

R4511 Assembly Hints

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

    Yeah, shortly after posting I think I figured it out

    Now, HOW does one check that? Just any old way of checking 45 between table and top of blade? Combo square?

    Comment


    • #47
      Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

      We are talking about two different things...what I am talking about is first setting your blade angle to 0 degrees and aligning the blade parallel with the miter slot. Then crank the blade over to 45 degrees and check how parallel it is to the miter slot at that angle.

      If it is off you need to shim under the table at the bolt locations to remedy...

      As the R4511 is left tilt, if you are seeing that the front of the blade is too far right, you will need to add shims under the front bolts (or remove some from the rear). If you are seeing that the rear of the blade is too far right, you'll need to do the opposite (add shims under the rear bolts or remove some from the front).

      Comment


      • #48
        Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

        Ahh, now I definitely understand.

        Only one more question (hopefully): once the blade is tilted, would I measure *at the table* or from some height off the table?

        Comment


        • #49
          Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

          You would check the blade alignment to the miter slot with the blade at 45 degrees the same way you would with the blade set at 0 degrees. (I use a jig that slides in the miter slot and a travel dial indicator). Ultimately with proper shimming and table alignment you can get both 0 and 45 degree blade settings close to perfect (mine was within .002 when I finished setting it up)

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

            What are these shims made of?

            Comment


            • #51
              Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

              From what I saw it looked like thin sheet metal (for some reason they "felt" galvanized, not 100% sure about that though).

              They are in the shape of a C and about 1.25" round.

              Comment


              • #52
                Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                Originally posted by tomapple View Post
                You would check the blade alignment to the miter slot with the blade at 45 degrees the same way you would with the blade set at 0 degrees. (I use a jig that slides in the miter slot and a travel dial indicator). Ultimately with proper shimming and table alignment you can get both 0 and 45 degree blade settings close to perfect (mine was within .002 when I finished setting it up)
                I measured with a straightedge, and it was fairly off to start (about 1/16"). However, I needed to add a LOT of shimming to get it into place........total of .120 or so (I dont know exactly how much was stock, as I used a set of feeler gauges stacked on each other to get it back into alignment).

                Is that a ridiculous amount?

                Whats interesting is the stock shim pack worked perfectly on the right side miter slot.......its dead on. But the left was 1/16" off.

                Now I need to find a local source of metal shims..........any ideas? Not sure Ive seen anything useful in the BORG hardware aisles..........maybe Sears Hardware?

                Comment


                • #53
                  Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                  1/16 seems like an awful lot to be off. I thikn mine was off around .010.

                  I wound up using some flat washers for shims.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                    Good grief! It sounds like I have gotten myself into a mess if I had shims and lost them. I didn't even mention that I unbolted the left side of the trunion first because I thought that was what was holding the table on (it was dark when I was doing this). Sounds like I could be spending quite a bit of time getting everything back like it is supposed to be. It will be at least a couple of months before I get to assemble the saw. I am sure I will be asking for more help on this forum.

                    Thanks tomapple and chris for your replies and questions to this point..

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                      Originally posted by Smack View Post
                      What are these shims made of?
                      They're very thin pieces of metal. They look like a large fender washer with the hole cut out in one direction. Kind of like a round U.
                      De Colores,
                      Dow
                      Boerne, TX

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                        Originally posted by tomapple View Post
                        1/16 seems like an awful lot to be off. I thikn mine was off around .010.

                        I wound up using some flat washers for shims.
                        Just to be sure, this is how I checked it:

                        Bevelled blade to 45 degrees. Took a straightedge and put it standing on edge on the table, then slid it until it contacted the front part of the blade. Read measurement to right side of left miter slot. Repeated the process at the back of the blade. It was close to 2/32" out. The front needed to be raised for it to be dead-on.

                        To gain that ~1/16", I needed to raise the front about .116" (according to the stacked feeler gauges). Note that this does NOT include the shims that are already there........I used the feeler gauges about 1" to the right of the existing shims, since the existing ones arent enough I figured the feeler gauges gave me an exact TOTAL amount of shimming required. In reality I probably only need 1 or 2 more of the shims that came with the saw.

                        Does this sound correct?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                          Using an adjustable combination square would be more accurate. Put the head of the square in your miter slot and against the edge of the miter slot then extend the scale on the square out to the side of your blade that is closest to the miter slot until the scale just brushes the blade. Tighten the lock on the square. Rotate the blade so the same point is now at the other end (so you are using the same reference point on the blade each time). Slide your square down the miter slot and check the distance between the scale and the blade.

                          Use wooden angled shims to raise the table as needed. Keep adjusting the table and checking as described above. When you get the blade and miter slot parallel then use your feeler gauges at the bolt locations below the table to determine how much shim you need. You should add a few thousandths to the number (because the shims will compress somewhat when you tighten the table).

                          Brass shim stock is available at most well stocked auto supply stores. Brass is recommended cause it is easy to cut and easy on your tools
                          Last edited by tomapple; 05-16-2009, 10:37 AM. Reason: spelling and clarification

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                            Just got mine today after waiting almost two weeks for delivery. I have read all or most of these hints, but haven't managed to remember them all. My first fauxpas was, like jimed1, to remove the right trunion bolts thinking they were the table bolts. I'm glad I knew about the shims. I marked them and put them in a bag. The two anchoring the cabinet to the packing frame also almost gave me a hernia. I suppose I could have started off the process by reading the manual, but what fun would that be?
                            Since I am doing this all alone, I went one step further and removed the motor. I removed the connection box from the motor since I couldn't get the strain relief loose. I raised the motor and rested it on a pair of 2x6s and removed the four bolts. A little awkward but not too difficult. With the motor out, even this 54-year-old geezer could turn the cabinet over and put it on a furniture dolly to work on the bottom. That's as far as I have gotten and will resume tomorrow after reviewing the info concerning assembly of the bottom end.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                              Anyone else notice that the stock blade has a thin kerf and the rivining knife is 3/32"? Checked my new 12" Ridgid sliding miter saw and think that blade is thin kerf. Matter of fact it seems all my blades are.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Re: R4511 Assembly Hints

                                Well, I finished today. I must say that the instructions leave a lot to be desired! As far as hardware is concerned, I think the most important thing is to determine between the terminology in the assembly directions vs. the repair sheet. They aren't consistant and sometimes seem to be wrong. The only thing I came up short on was one lock knob for the adjustment wheels.

                                Somewhat contrary to the instructions, I proceded this way: I first assembled the legs and attached them to the cabinet. (which was upside down) I then installed the sawdust chute, followed by the Herc-U-Lift. This was all very straight forward and gave me no problems. I then stood it upright and sealed all around the bottom, inside and out, with clear silicone sealant. I don't think I'll have much, if any, sawdust leakage. I then reinstalled the motor and belt.

                                Reinstallation of the top, wings, and fence went without issue. I would advise installing the fence front rail while adjusting the side tables to ensure all three table faces are flush across the front, otherwise the front fence rail may deform as you tighten it down and the stress might crack the granite.

                                I'm trying to decide what I will use for fence faces at this time. I'm considering adapting a Uni-T fence for a Delta Uni-Fence. The ads all say "For Delta Uni-Fence Only!" but looking at the design I think that it could easily be adapted to my fence. In the meantime, I'll just make some out of laminate covered MDF.

                                I plan on installing 3 neodmium magnets in the pockets above, below, and between the screws holes on the motor cover along with a handle on the front side of it so I don't have to remove screws to open the motor cover.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X